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Go Easy, Profs. 



LEBANON VALLEY COLLEGE 



VOL. XI 



ANNVILLE, PENNSYLVANIA, THURSDAY, JANUARY 17, 1935 



No. 16 



Franklin & Marshall 
Romps to Victory 

L V. C. UNIMPRESSIVE 

Flying Dutchmen Lose to Oppo- 
nents In Unexciting Con- 
test; Score 42-25 



The Franklin and Marshall basketeers 
enjoyed nary a single anxious moment 
in their opening league encounter with 
Lebanon Valley's Flying Dutchmen last 
Saturday night, the Lancaster collegians 
completely submerging the L. V. C. at- 
tack to register a 42-25 triumph on the 
Lebanon High court. 

The F. & M. starting five flashed a 
brilliant passing offensive that swept 
them into a 23-4 lead by halftime. Late 
in the second half the Valleyites seemed 
to find themselves while the F. & M. re- 
serve tossers were carrying on and ral- 
lied to outscore the Lancastrians 21-19 
in the final 20 minutes. 

The field goal tossing of "Woody" 
Sponaugle, Sam Jacobs, Hummer, and 
Wenrich of the starting F. & M. quintet 
.was little short of sensational, while 
Yeager, substitute center, snared 10 
points in the second half to snare high- 
scoring honors. 

Captain "Butch" Barthold and "Bill" 
Smith, with seven and nine points re- 
spectively, led the scoring for Metoxen's 
boys. 

The large crowd which turned out for 
the opening tilt was decidedly disap- 
pointed by the Valley showing, although 
it must be remembered that the Blue and 
White boys were in their first battle of 
the year. Marked improvement should 
be evidenced by the time the season gets 
under way and the Metoxen-coached 
lads, especially the newcomers, become 
more accustomed to varsity competition. 

In sharp contrast to the "off night" 
Playing of the Dutchmen, the F. & M. 
S( ]uad seemed to enjoy an "on night," 
with all sorts of wild stabs registering 
twin counters for the Lancastrians. Nev- 
ertheless Coach Holman's passers served 
Ver y definite notice that they are strong 
contenders for Gettysburg's crown as 
Eastern Pennsylvania Collegiate champs. 
(Continued on Page 3, Column 3) 



Gettysburg Bullets 
Down L. V. Five 



F ROSH PROGRAM 
FOR CLIONIANS 



The Clionian Literary Society held a 
re 9ular meeting in the hall on Friday 
eve ning. After a brief business session 

which the president, Helen Earnest, 
P^sided, a program arranged by the 
jeshrnen was presented. Lena Risser 

n ned the program and had as an- 
( ncer s Lucille Maberry who first in- 
joduced Catherine Mills, Helen Butter- 

gave Dorothy Kreamer - This trio 
, lri real Pennsylvania Dutch fashion 
that a]u r 

the T ys runny dialogue, "Crossing 
Pear Silva Harclerode next ap- 

Hovel ^ severa ' numDers with her 
see Plan ° and harmonica setup. To 
ly an< ^ hear is to fully appreciate. Final- 
Witn St ! rr ' n 9 dramatic pantomine was 



Be at . e °^ a ^ Ve nture, daring, and surprises. 



a tJi SSe< ^ T'he Light Horse Tragedy," 
' e atri Ce 7 

ligh t . ^ ar nojski was the keeper of the 
Cami McKeag, his faithful wife; 

s °n. n olller - his pop-gun shooting 



res Pecf UlSec * as doctor and undertaker 

a he] £^Y< Hazel Hemingway and Is- 

acteH ° X P arr -icipated. Louise Stoner 
vl as th 

c °rnn a . treacherous villain. As ac- 
(C ^ UVa Harclerode added much 
° nti nued on Page 2, Column 5) 



IN BRILLIANT RALLY 



Gettysburg Comes From Behind 
To Overscore Valley 
Lead 



A dazzling last half rally carried the 
Bullets of Gettysburg to a brilliant vic- 
tory over the L. V. C. basketeers Tues- 
day at Gettysburg. 

Sponaugle, Snell, Smith, and Barthold 
led the Flying Dutchmen's determined 
first half offensive drive that registered 
17 points while the Bullets were count- 
ing 18. 

Early in the last period the Valleyites 
went into the lead, 20-18, only to be 
thwarted by an amazing rally that net- 
ted 19 points for Gettysburg while Leba- 
non Valley was held to 3 counters to 
net the Bullets 37 points to 23 for Valley. 
(Continued on Page 3, Column 1) 



Wig and Buckle Club 
Offers Greek Drama 



STONECIPHER IS ADVISER 



Gillan Directs Cast In Amusing 
Comedy Laid In 
Hades 



The Greek play "The Frogs," will be 
given on Thursday, January 17, by the 
Wig and Buckle Club with Dr. Stone- 
cipher as adviser. Louise Gillan is in 
charge of its direction, Carl Long of 
properties, Ida Hall and Grace Naugle 
of costumes, and Holsinger, Harbold, I. 
Smith, and Risser of the make-up. 

The cast is as follows: Xanthias, Ma- 
gee; Dead Man, Berger; Bacchus, L. 
Beamesderfer; Aeschylus, Kinney; Euri- 
pides, Saylor; Charon, Straub; Hercules, 
Needy; First Woman, Harclerode; Sec- 
ond Woman, C. Roberts; Maid Servant, 
Faust; chorus leader, Mountz; Pluto, 
Bollinger; Aeacus, Eastland. 

A brief summary of the plot: Bacchus, 
convinced that all the good poets are 
dead, wants to go to Hades to find one. 
Accordingly, he consults Hercules who 
had been there, and learns the correct 
procedure. So, together with his servant 
Xanthias they begin the journey, meet- 
ing Charon first, then Aeacus, bewailing 
the loss of his coatcle-dog, Cerberus. 
Later there is strife between Euripides, 
god of Tragedy, and Aeschylus who 
tries to take his place. A trial is ar- 
ranged, with Bacchus as judge, in which 
each claimant takes hold of one side of 
a noose and recites his poetry to see 
which is heavier. Aeschylus wins, and 
accompanies Bacchus back to the upper 
world after a celebration with Pluto. 



Chem Laboratory 
Approved By Navy 

On last November 13 Lieutenant 
Commanders M. A. Deans and H. C. 
Chapin of the Navy Department in- 
spected the equipment of the Chemis- 
try Department of the college and as 
a result Dr. Bender has been notified 
that this laboratory has been put on 
the list of accepted laboratories do- 
ing outside testing of steels for the 
Navy Department. 

The Navy Department became in- 
terested in this laboratory as a result 
of work on stainless steels done by 
Dr. Bender during the past three 
years. 



Sophomores To Hold 
Dance This Week 

Saturday night is the date set for the 
•annual Soph Hop. In order to have a 
larger crowd, the committee has done 
away with the difficulties of transporta- 
tion by holding the dance in the Ann- 
ville High School gymnasium. At the 
same time the sophs are introducing a 
new, though well-known orchestra to 
the campus, the Harrisburg De Molay 
orchestra. The dance will begin at 8:00 
o'clock; admission is one dollar per 
couple. 

The committees for the dance are: 
Place, Jean Harnish, Wilbur Leech, Rob- 
ert Kell and Mary Batz; orchestra, Rich- 
ard Smith, Lois Harbold, Gerald Bittin- 
ger, Martha Faust; time, Maxine Earley, 
Ruth Buck, Sara K. Meckley; decoration, 
Louis Straub, Ida Belle Smith, Janet Hol- 
singer, Elwood Needy; tickets, Paul Bil- 
lett, Bernard Stevens, Mary Webb, Ele- 
anor Engle; chaperon, Ted Loose, Ro- 
maine Stiles, Cordelia Sheaffer, Lloyd 
Beamesderfer. 



L. V. C. BAND SHINES 

AT INAUGURATION 



In the inaugural parade Tuesday 
noon our own L. V. C. band headed 
the Lebanon county delegation. The 
full band of 48 members and our 
drum major went to Harrisburg Tues- 
day morning by cars and by special 
train. All the uniforms were cleaned 
and pressed for the occasion. The 
two new Sousaphones which were 
recently purchased by the band are a 
great improvement to the organiza- 
tion. Between 60 and 70 bands pa- 
raded and we are proud that L. V. 
C.'s band equalled if not surpassed 
the other bands. It was our fine mu- 
sic, good marching and snappy uni- 
forms that secured us the first posi- 
tion in the Lebanon county delegation. 



STUDENT MISSIONARY 
DESCRI BES M O YA MBA 

LA VIE' INTERVIEWS HELEN COLE 



Detailed Account of Trip, African Stay, and Experiences As 
Related By Otterbein Graduate Sent As First United 
Brethren Representative to Foreign Field. 



(As told by M. Jane Shellenberger) 
We must turn the pages of history to 
the long ago, for it seems that many 
years have passed since November 3, 
1932. That day I bade goodbye to Amer- 
ica and turned my eyes eastward to be 
the first representative of the United 
Brethren colleges and seminary for the 
cause of missions. The journey was 
made by a Drake line boat, part cargo 
and part freight, which sails directly 
from New York harbor to Africa. Two 
stops were made before we reached my 
destination. First at the Cape Verde Is- 
land. This land is owned by the Portu- 
gese and peopled by all conceivable mix- 
tures of race which leads consequently 
to quite a lowly situation. The harbor is 
filled with men and boys who are expert 
divers. If coins are thrown into the wa- 
ter in a few moments, they come up with 
the metal between their teeth. There is 
nothing that pleases them more than to 
receive the captain's much braided shirt 
or a pair of old shoes. After we had re- 
fueled, for that is the place's only indus- 



Frosh Basketeers 
Down 2 Opponents 

LOSE IN THIRD STRUGGLE 



Y. C. I. And Annville High Are 
Vanquished But Long's 
Five Wins 



LEBANON VALLEY FRESHMEN 

G. F. T. 

Billett, f 6 4 16 

Tindall, f 3 1 7 

Keiper, f 

Aungst, c 2 3 7 

Kroske, g 2 2 6 

Seaks, g 10 2 

Gongloff, g , 

Totals 14 10 38 

YORK COLLEGIATE INSTITUTE 

G. F. T. 

Buckingham, f 5 4 14 

Rupprecht, f 1 1 3 

Strickler, c 2 4 8 

Shenberger, c 

Orwig, g 2 4 

Enderline, g 

Wilton, g 3 1 7 

Totals 13 10 36 

(Continued on Page 3, Column 2) 



Community Concerts End With Fine Program 



This coming week the Community 
Concert Association will present two 
concerts in nearby cities. The final Lan- 
caster concert will be given Monday eve- 
ning in Hensel hall, on the F. and M. 
campus where we will hear that noted 
young American baritone Frederic Baer. 
From the prosaic desk of a cost account- 
ant to the limelight of America's concert 
rtage, Baer's career rolls along in story 
book fashion. Since his New York de- 
but, two years ago, he has earned a 
wide reputation as an exponent of ora- 
torio, opera in concert form, and recital 



programs. A New England critic, re- 
viewing the baritone's part in the Wor- 
cester Oratorio Society's presentations 
of the "Messiah" said, "He puts that ex- 
tra bit of work into his solos that raises 
him from the ordinary singer to the art- 
ist. It would be difficult to tell which 
of his arias was the best. They were all 
polished to the very limit." 

The second of the Lebanon concerts 
will be given January 23 in the high 
school auditorium. Rosemarie Brancato, 
soprano, and Robert Goldsand, pianist, 
will be the two artists. Rosemarie Bran- 



cato's debut was the most talked-of event 
of last season. This young singer was 
born 22 years ago in Kansas City, of 
Italian parents and enrolled as a stu- 
dent in Eastman School of Music in 
Rochester when she was 16 years of age. 
Two years later she won the Atwater 
Kent state contest. From Rochester she 
went to New York where she studied 
with Estelle Liebling and then came her 
debut at the Chicago Opera Company 
as Gilda in "Rigoletto". 

Robert Goldsand though still in his 
(Continued on Page 2, Column 2) 



try^to supply oil, we went on to Dakar 
on the west coast and finally to Free- 
town, my destination. The journey cov- 
ered nineteen days. 

The dock was filled with little black 
boys who cried at the travelers. Were 
they English it would be, "My name 
Gladstone, carry your bag, Missie," if 
Americans they called, "My name Wash- 
ington, your bag?" They expected pa- 
triotism would draw forth a larger fee 
for them. From Freetown we traveled 
inland seventy-five miles on a narrow 
gauge train. The coaches are much like 
those in America though greatly smaller. 
A passenger is able to touch the roof 
when he stretches up his arm. 

The mission compound where I was to 
work is located at Moyamba. The com- 
pound includes the Lillian R. Hartford 
school for girls, the missionaries' quar- 
ters and the United Brethren church. 
This school which was my chief inter- 
est, is a boarding institution which ac- 
commodates one hundred and forty girls 
who range from the primary to the ju- 
nior and senior grade.-,. There a'" &a 
native teachers, all graduates, for the 
lower school while white teachers instruct 
the upper classes. Except for students 
when they first come, all teaching is done 
in English since there are too many dia- 
lects represented. Naturally, this makes 
the work of an American teacher much 
easier. The subjects taught correspond 
to those of our upper grades and high 
school. The curriculum includes physi- 
ology, general science, nursing, sewing, 
English and particularly emphasized is 
Bible. The girls take a correspondence 
course from the Moody Bible Institute 
and receive a diploma from them. 

All the students have industrial tasks 
to be performed outside of school hours. 
They work in groups and do such work 
(Continued on Page 2, Column 3) 



DAFMCE PLANNED 

BY DELPHIANS 



Miss Betty Ford was elected anni- 
versary president for Delphian and Miss 
Sandy Hall vice-president. The other 
officers installed by Miss Ford at a reg- 
ular meeting last Friday night were: 
Miss Cordelia Shaeffer, recording secre- 
tary; Miss Claire Adams, corresponding 
secretary; Miss Louise Bishop, treasurer; 
Miss June Gingrich, critic; Miss Mary 
Webb, chaplain; Miss Ernestine Jagne- 
sak and Miss Ella Mason, wardens. 

The various committees for the dance 
to be held on Saturday night, February 
16, have been chosen and are busy work- 
ing on their plans. No definite place for 
the dance has been chosen as yet. The 
committees are as follows: Favor, Mari- 
etta Ossi, chairman; June Gingrich and 
Dorothy Balsbaugh; place, Anne Butter- 
wick, Ida Hall. Catherine Wagner; or- 
chestra, Mary March, Charlotte Stabley, 
Ella Mason; program and invitation, 
June Gingrich, Louise Bishop, Ernestine 
Jagnesak and Romaine Stiles. 

Many letters have been received from 
alumnae expecting to return for the 
dance. The anniversary pla\ r will be 
given at the time of Kalo's anniversary. 



PAGE TWO 



LA VIE COLLEGIENNE, THURSDAY, JANUARY 17, 1935 



Ha Viz Collegtenne 

ESTABLISHED 1925 



A weekly publication by the Under- 
graduate Students of Lebanon 
Valley College 



EDITORIAL STAFF 

Helen Earnest, '35 Editor-in-Chief 

George Hiltner, '35 Associate Editor 

Richard Baus, '37 Managing Editor 

David Yake, '36 Asst. Man. Editor 



RE PORTO RIAL STAFF 



Catherine Wagner, '35 
Sylvia Evelev, '36 
Louise Gillan, '36 
Lester Krone, '36 
Marian Leisey, 36 
Maxine Earley, '37 

Grace Naugle, '37 

Ida K. Hall, '35 

William Earnest, '37 

Miriam Eichner, '37 — 

Louis Straub, '37 

Charles Hauck, '35 

Jane Shellenberger, 36.. 
Marietta Ossi, '35 



General Reporters 

Conservatory 

Athletics 



Alumni 

—Philokosmian 

Kalozetean 

Clionian 

Delphian 



BUSINESS STAFF 

Kenneth Sheaffer, '35...~Business Manager 
Albert Anderson, '36™Asst. Bus. Manager 

Robert Cassel, '36 Circulation Manager 

Elwood Needy, *37 Asst. Cir. Manager 



Single Copies.. 
Subscription.™. 



..5 cents 



,.$1.00 per year 



Entered at the Annville, Pa., post 
office as second class matter, under the 
Act of March 3, 1879. 



THURSDAY* JAN. 17, 1935 



A WORD TO THE WISE 



Exams are only a few days off, and 
as the time for them approaches there 
also come feelings which few on our 
campus escape. These feelings range 
from the one extreme of assurance to 
the other extreme of almost mental aber- 
ration worrying for fear of "flunking 
out." As for the former group, more 
power to you. It's for the latter group 
and especially in the ranks of the fresh- 
man class that this article is chiefly con- 
cerned. We have reasons to hope and 
believe that the number weeded out by 
exams will be fewer in this freshman 
class than any other class in the more 
recent history of our campus, compara- 
tively speaking. However, don't allow 
that statement to give you a false sense 
of security. The faculty will not give 
that point any consideration when it 
comes to the point of deciding who stays 
and who does not stay. It will be you, 
the student, who causes the decision to 
be rendered. As for the worrying; the 
person who indulges in this rather men- 
tally tiresome pastime is only injuring 
himself. First he is doing harm to body 
and mind by worrying alone, and then, 
the mind is diverted from concentration 
on study so that, what little he does know 
may become entangled with itself and the 
process of worrying as well, thereby di- 
minishing the capability of making the 
grade. In doing this he is being unfair 
to himself. In saying that the student 
should not worry, it is not meant that he 
should not be concerned at all over 
exams, even if he thinks he is not thor- 
oughly enough acquainted with a subject 
just to get through it. This may be the 
cause of a catastrophe as well. Of course 
this may call attention as to the indi- 
vidual opinions on the fairness of exami- 
nations and grades, but we must accept 
general opinion, face the seemingly ine- 
vitable and take our exams. College life 
certainly is no bed of roses. We must 
take the bitter with the sweet, only, take 
a bit of psychologically scientific advice 
and don't worry yourself sick over 
exams. 




BEYOND^ CAMPUS 

The property rights of the humble oys- 
ter, hitherto an unprotected chattel, are 
given legal defense for the first time in 
the history of jurisprudence. The occa- 
sion was a dinner to which a young man 
took two young women. The one or- 
dered oysters; while she left the room for 
a minute the other reached over and ap- 
propriated an oyster. And that oyster 
contained a pearl. There arose the ques- 
tion—who owns the pearl? The courts 
had to settle the matter. The man claimed 
it because he was paying for the oysters 
The young woman who ordered them 
claimed it, and the young woman who 
found it also claimed it. The court de- 
creed that the first person to discover 
the pearl is entitled to the possession of 
it against all claims of all parties, the 
only exception being the oyster itself. 



The eyes of the world are focused on 
the Saar, the territory which last Sun- 
day decided its future political being by 
vote. This plebiscite brings us many 
stories of human interest. Even the lame, 
the halt, the blind and the very aged 
rated. One aged woman who tried to 
vote at Haustadt was the first plebiscite 
fatality. She suffered a hemorrhage 
when she stumbled while stepping out of 
an automobile, but nevertheless insisted 
on voting. Before she could deposit her 
ballot, she died. 

Another amusing incident in the Saar 
was one little outburst of antagonism. 
On January 6, the last mass meetings of 
both factions were held. Violence was 
prepared for. The only clash which oc- 
curred however was the cutting of tele- 
phone wires in the Nazi headquarters by 
the opposition. The Nazis retaliated by 
cutting the wire for the loud speaker at 
the opposition's mass meeting. This lack 
of violence in the Saar, however, has 
been most pleasing to the world. 



The Lindbergh-Hauptmann trial is 
naturally bringing forth many new plans 
and inventions for solving crime scien- 
tifically. One of these is the mirror 
room which uses the psychology of color. 
The accused person is placed in a room 
in which all the walls are mirrors, and 
is questioned through a hole in the wall. 
The lights are gradually shaded to green. 
The accused sees everywhere his face 
made ghastly by the light. He is sup- 
posed to believe his expression to be be- 
traying him. This color and the sight of 
his face finally breaks down the crimi- 
nal's nerve and he confesses the crime. 



The World Court issue is again being 
brought up. This time it is expected that 
there will be favorable action. At any 
rate it is rumored that the pact has a 
two-thirds majority in the Senate now. 



STUDENT MISSIONARY 

DESCRIBES MOYAMBA 



[Continued from Page One) 



COMMUNITY CONCERTS 

PRESENT ARTISTS 



[Continued from Page One) 



early twenties is known throughout 
Canada, Europe, United States and 
South America. He has a dazzling tech- 
nique with extraordinary beauty of tone 
and is a thorough musician. 

Wednesday evening will find many 
students and faculty members at the 
Forum in Harrisburg where the All-Star 
concert series is presenting the Hall- 
Johnson choir. This choir is one of the 
most outstanding of all negro organiza- 
tions. 

The last concert of the month will be 
on January 30 when the Community 
Concert Association will present the Vi- 
enna boys choir in Allentown. 



June: I wonder what makes the tower 
of Pisa lean. 

Marietta: I wish I knew; I'd take 
some. 



as washing, ironing, scrubbing, cooking, 
and sweeping the compound, which they 
call "sweeping dirty." 

Religion means much to those natives 
who have accepted Christianity. In the 
compound the church is attended to by 
native preachers. Just recently this 
building was dedicated, an occasion 
which called for a great holiday for eve- 
ryone associated with the mission. Every 
Sunday services are held as well as Sun- 
day school. The Junior Christian En- 
deavor is attended by about seventy-five 
children each week and conducted by 
the older girls of the school. I am very 
much interested in the Otterbein Guild 
where forty girls are members. Our pro- 
grams are very similar to those of your 
chapters here but adapted to our own 
needs. Last year we contributed almost 
seven dollars to the woman's work fund 
for the betterment of women's conditions. 
This seems like a small amount but in 
Africa it was an achievement. The Afri- 
can Conference of the United Brethren 
Church is now in session. Each girl con- 
tributed a piece of her own work for an 
industrial sale at the conference. The 
church and its advancement comes first 
in the lives of native believers. 

With commencement in December the 
school closes for vacation and the girls 
return home. Commencement is a great 
celebration. People gather from the 
whole country side. E ach girl wears for 
graduation the clothing she has made 
herself. In honor of the graduates a huge 
tea is given that day. The vacation 
which lasts until December 1 is the mis- 
sionaries' time for rest. This period is 
spent in the lovely rest cottage above 
Freetown. It is a very beautiful site 
overlooking the harbor. At night the air 
becomes very cool and one forgets the 
tropical sun. At the rest home we come 
more closely in contact with wild ani- 
mals than at the mission. Constantly we 
find our various fowls stolen. 

But you would be interested in the 
customs of the natives, wouldn't you? 
Living conditions are quite safe in the 
villages as far as health conditions are 
concerned. The English government has 
a sanitary inspector who keeps strong 
control. They are careful especially to 
guard against mosquito-breeding situa- 
tions. However, in the outer districts the 
people are exposed to all sorts of diseases 
and have all manner of cures for them. 

The girls in the school wear print 
dresses made on very simple, straight 
patterns and go barefooted and bare- 
headed. Their hair is worn in tiny braids 
or cut close to the head. The native 
teachers are privileged to wear shoes 
and hats. The villagers wear any man- 
ner of clothing which they rudely fash- 
ion from hand-woven cloth made with 
their own cotton. 

The diet is very simple. We have rice 
one day and the next day rice again. 
With it is served oil, meats, a great va- 
riety of leaves and very much pepper. 
The natives have their gardens to raise 
the leaves, none of which are familiar 
here. The meat is of goats, sheep, and 
cows. The cows are a small, rather sick- 
ly-looking breed brought from the north 
of the continent. A dried fish called bun- 
ga is quite popular but it is so foul-smell- 
ing there isn't much attraction for me. 
However, we do have fresh fish. Much 
of the missionaries' food of necessity 
must be canned but it is surprising how 
fond one becomes of rice. 

The weather is an interesting feature 
in Africa. We have only two seasons— 
a rainy and a dry. The rainy season ex- 
tends from April for about three or four 
months. Each day the rain falls later in 
the day until the season is past. During 
my stay the greatest rainfall was two 
inches in three hours. The dry season 
is much less attractive and we all loathe 
the time. You know, I suppose, that in 
Africa there is no dawn or dusk but that 
day passes suddenly into night and night 



NEW KALO LEADERS 



At a recent election of Kalo the 
following officers were elected for the 
spring term: Harry Schwartz, presi- 
dent, while his new co-officers will be 
William Kirkpatrick, vice-president; 
Howard Reber, recording secretary; 
Charles Kinney, corresponding secre- 
tary; Lloyd Beamesderfer, chaplain; 
Robert Sausser, critic; Ernest Koch, 
pianist; and Clarence Aungst, John 
Gongloff, and Harry Zerbe as ser- 
geants-at-arms. 



to day. 

I told you of my itinerating work to 
the outlying towns. We could travel not 
much more than two and a half miles, 
for we had to walk the distance, hold 
our service, and return before the sun 
rose too high. We grew accustomed 6n 
these excursions to receiving all sorts of 
gifts. Strings of fowls, animals, cloth- 
ing, trinkets were showered on us. 

Africans' amusements are much the 
same as any children's. They have their 
own games which are composed of phy- 
sical activity, dancing, and shouting. 
They seem to have no quiet games. In 
our church we use an organ for music 
but elsewhere the native instrument is 
certainly the drum which plays a promi- 
nent part in all gatherings. The people 
sing and love to. We use many of our 
common hymns for the church has the 
Sanctuary hymnal. 

Native homes, as you are perhaps fa- 
miliar, are composed of mud and grass- 
es. They are very simple for after all 
the African uses his home for little else 
than sleeping; all his activities are car- 
ried on outdoors. For this reason light- 
ing equipment is very primitive. Oil is 
used as the fuel. We do have a telephone 
and telegraph system but not as you 
know it since our system is composed of 
runners who carry the messages. 

In Freetown there are other Christian 
churches established but among the na- 
tives is the Mohammedan religion of 
which many are firm followers. The Af- 
rican is strongly attracted by the elabo- 
rate ritual of Mohammedism. There are 
various pagan creeds flourishing too and 
one comes upon all sorts of strange cus- 
toms and practices. 

Just a glimpse of Africa I have had in 
those two short and yet very long years 
for I set sail for home November 17, 



1934. I don't want to think 
there is ended for there is so much to 
I can't go back, however, under ^ 



>, 

same conditions and it may be f 0r " e 
of you from Lebanon Valley to f o jj 0lle 



ALUMNI NOTES 



Mr. W. Albert Brunner, 'H, ^ 
Sunday, Jan. 6, at his home, 602 South 
23rd St., Harrisburg, of a compli Cat j 
of diseases that confined him to his bed 
for six months. He was fifty y ears ^ 
age. Mr. Brunner, after graduating 
taught in the York High School f r 
1911 to 1918, and in the Technical Hi^ 
School in Harrisburg, 1918 to 1915 
From 1919 until his retirement on ac 
count of ill health a year ago, he taught 
in the Edison Junior High School. j„ 
1921 he received his Master's Deg ree 
from Lehigh University. He is survived 
by his widow and a daughter, Frances 
Dr. Lynch and Dr. Shenk represented 
the college at the funeral on Wednes- 
day, Jan. 9. 



FROSH PROGRAM 

FOR CLIONIANS 



(Continued from Page One) 



while Betty Bender acted as reader. 

More amusing programs are in store 
for Clionians when the sophomores are 
to conduct. 

Miss Helen Cole, who is a member of 
the Clionian Literary Society at Otter- 
bein College was a guest of the society. 



Duke university 

SCHOOL OF MEDICINE 

DURHAM, N. C. 

Four terms of eleven weeks are given 
each year. These may be taken con- 
secutively (graduation in three years) 
or three terms may be taken each year 
(graduation in four years). The en- 
trance requirements are intelligence, 
character and at least two years of 
college work, including the subjects 
specified for Grade A Medical Schools. 
Catalogues and application forms may 
be obtained from the Dean. 



SAINT JOHNSBURY ACADEMY 

Saint Johnsbury, Vermont 

An Old New England Academy in an Old New England Town. Thorough 
reparation for college. Commercial courses. Dormitories for boys and girls. 
A/ U D t lS- I l $ «2.^ overs a11 expenses. Scholarship aid for worthy boys and girls. 
WRITE PRINCIPAL STANLEY R. OLDHAM. L. V C. 08 



a call for action 

• . . when your fond aunt 
sends a check (or, even 
more so, when she doesn't) 
something must be done 
about it. 

Consider, then, the advan- 
tages of a telephone call. 
It's short, snappy, inexpen- 
sive and certainly bound 
to please. 



• Call 100 miles for 60 cents by 
Day Rate; for 50 cents by Eve- 
ning Rate; for 35 cents by 
Night Rate. (Station to Station 
calls — 3-minute connections.) 



The Bell Telephone Company of Pennsyl^ 



No. 1 



LA VIE COLLEGIENNE, THURSDAY, JANUARY 17, 1935 



PAGE THREE 




The sports column this week will pre- 
flt without any particular comment 

SC e athletic schedules which have not 

[ e t been presented in La Vie. 



Oct- 



Oct 



1935 FOOTBALL SCHEDULE 

5^-Penn State at State College, 
Pa. 

12— Muhlenberg at Allentown. 



j9^-Drexel at Annville. 
{ 26— Fordham at New York. 



Nov 



2— P. M. C. at Annville. 



9^ St. Joe at Philadelphia 
(Pending) . 
^ oV Albright at Annville. 
j^ qV 23— Delaware at Newark, Del. 

Note the three home games— also the 
battle with Fordham replacing an en- 
gagement with Juniata. 



Remaining games on Frosh basketball 
schedule: 

Sat., Jan. 26— Wyomissing Polytechnic 
Institute at Lebanon. 

Sat., Feb. 2— Belle Knitting Five at Leb- 
anon. 

Wed., Feb. 13— Albright College Fresh- 
men at Reading. 

Fri., Feb. 15— Opponent to be selected, 
at Lebanon. 

Sat, March 2— Consumer's Ice Co., at 
Lebanon. 

Sat., March 9— Albright Freshmen at 
Lebanon. 



The complete schedule of the Eastern 
Penna. Collegiate Basketball League, 
with scores of games already played. 



Eastern Pennsylvania Collegiate Bas- 
ketball League scores. 

Wednesday, January 9— Ursinus 55, 
Albright 36, Reading; Drexel 24; Muhl- 
enberg 38, Allentown. 

Saturday, January 12— Albright 30; 
Drexel 31, Philadelphia; Franklin 6 
Marshall 42; Lebanon Valley 25, Leba- 
non; Gettysburg 36; Ursinus 32, Col- 
legeville. 



GETTYSBURG BULLETS 

DOWN L. V. C. FIVE 



(Continued from Page One) 



LEBANON VALLEY 

G. F. T. 

Billett, f 1 o 2 

Ru «t, f 

B arthold, f 2 1 5 

j}- s Ponaugle, c 2 4 

H g 

, mith . g 2 i 5 

H" g 2 3 7 

Cart °let, g 

Totals 9 5 23 

GETTYSBURG 

Q G. F. T. 

> f 2 2 6 

F *?' f 

to, z i - ooo 

j? ac Milla n> c 12 4 

c m h r c o ° ° 



er - g ooo 

Totals Te 1 37 

periods: 

Ge t ^, n V alle y 17 6 ~ 23 

V bur 9 18 19-37 

Aiftg e *~~Menton. Umpire — Neun. 
hal ves: 20 minutes. 



FROSH BASKETEERS 

DOWN TWO OPPONENTS 



(Continued from Page One) 



LEBANON VALLEY FRESHMEN 

G. F. T. 

Billett, f 4 1 9 

Shenk, f 1 1 

Tindall, f 4 8 

Keiper, f 

Aungst, c 4 8 

Gongloff, c 

Kroske, g 4 8 

Zavada, g 12 4 

Seaks, g 

Capka, g 

Totals 17 4 38 

ANNVILLE HIGH 

G. F. T. 

Grimm, f 3 2 8 

F. Arndt, f 3 3 

Wood, c 1 2 4 

Brubaker, c 11 

O. Arndt, g 2 3 7 

Reigert, g 2 2 

Totals 6 13 25 

LEBANON VALLEY FRESHMEN 

G. F. T. 

Billett, f 4 2 10 

Tindall, f 3 3 9 

Aungst, c 5 3 13 

Kroske, g 10 2 

Seaks, g 

Rozman, g 2 2 

Sheesley, g 

Totals 13 10 36 

LONG'S CITY LEAGUE FIVE 

G. F. T. 

Euston, f 9 2 20 

Wilhelm, f 2 1 5 

Curtin, f 1 1 3 

Rank, f 

Zohn, c 1 2 

Lutz, g 1 1 3 

Deck, g 1 1 

Messe, g 2 4 

Boltz, g 

Totals 16 6 38 



FRANKLIN & MARSHALL 

ROMPS TO VICTORY 



(Continued from Page One) 



LEBANON VALLEY 

G. F. T. 

Barthold, f 3 1 7 

Sponaugle, f, c 10 2 

Rust, f 1 2 

Billett, c : 1 1 

Smith, g 3 3 9 

Snell, g 1 2 4 

Totals 9 7 25 

FRANKLIN AND MARSHALL 

G. F. T. 

Jacobs, f 3 6 

Wenrich, f 3 6 

Hughes, f 

Reber, f 

Sponaugle, c 3 2 8 

Yeager, c 5 10 

Snyder, c 1 2 

Hummer, g 3 6 

Roddy, g 1 2 

Martin, g 1 2 

Philips, g 

Totals 20 2 42 

Score by periods: 

Franklin and Marshall 23 19—42 

Lebanon Valley 4 21—25 

Referee — John Borger, Lancaster. Time 
by halves— 20 minutes. 



BOOMERANG 



Barney— I've decided to get married. 

Hauck— Won't it increase your ev- 
penses too much? 

Barney— No, I figure it will double 
the life of my tires and cut my gasoline 
bill in two. 



Underwood: Would you — er— advise 
me to marry a beautiful girl or a sensible 
girl? 

Hauck: I'm afraid you'll never be able 
to marry either, old man. A beautiful 
girl could do better and a sensible girl 
would know better. 



A mugwump is a person educated be- 
yond his intellect. 



"Don't stand there loafing," said the 
professor to three of his students. 

"We're not loafing— there's only three 
of us, and it takes leaven to make a loaf." 



E. P. C. Basketball Schedule, 1935 



Tuesday, January 15— Lebanon Val- 
ley vs. Gettysburg, Gettysburg. 

Wednesday, January 16, Muhlenberg 
vs. Albright, Reading. 

Saturday, January 19— Gettysburg vs. 
Drexel, Philadelphia; Franklin & Mar- 
shall vs. Muhlenberg. 

Wednesday, January 23— Drexel vs. 
Franklin & Marshall, Lancaster. 

Saturday, January 26— Gettysburg vs. 
Lebanon Valley, Lebanon. 

Wednesday, January 30 — Lebanon 
Valley vs. Drexel, Philadelphia. 

Saturday, February 2— Ursinus vs. 
Lebanon Valley, Lebanon; Muhlenberg 
vs. Drexel, Philadelphia. 

Tuesday, February 5— Ursinus vs. 
Drexel, Philadelphia. 

Wednesday, February 6 — Lebanon 
Valley vs. Muhlenberg, Allentown. 

Friday, Feb. 8— Franklin & Marshall 
vs Ursinus, Collegeville. 

Saturday, Feb. 9— Gettysburg vs. 
Muhlenberg, Allentown; Franklin & Mar- 
shall vs. Drexel, Philadelphia. 

Wednesday, Feb. 13— Lebanon Valley 
vs. Albright, Reading; Gettysburg vs. 
Franklin & Marshall, Lancaster; Muhlen- 
berg vs. Ursinus, Collegeville. 

Friday, Feb. 15— Drexel vs. Lebanon 
Valley, Lebanon. 



Saturday, Feb. 16— Drexel vs. Gettys- 
burg, Gettysburg; Albright vs. Muhlen- 
berg, Allentown. 

Monday, Feb. 18— Franklin & Mar- 
shall vs. Albright, Reading. 

Wednesday, Feb. 20— Muhlenberg vs. 
Gettysburg, Gettysburg; Lebanon Valley 
vs. Franklin & Marshall, Lancaster; Al- 
bright vs. Ursinus, Collegeville. 

Saturday, Feb. 23— Ursinus vs. Muhl- 
enberg, Allentown; Gettysburg vs. Al- 
bright, Reading. 

Tuesday, Feb. 26— Muhlenberg vs. 
Franklin & Marshall, Lancaster. 

Wednesday, Feb. 27— Albright vs. 
Franklin & Marshall, Lancaster; Drexel 
vs. Ursinus, Collegeville. 

Friday, March 1— Ursinus vs. Gettys- 
burg, Gettysburg. 

Saturday, March 2— Drexel vs. Al- 
bright, Reading; Muhlenberg vs. Leba- 
non Valley, Lebanon; Ursinus vs. Frank- 
lin & Marshall, Lancaster. 

Wednesday, March 6— Albright vs. 
Gettysburg, Gettysburg; Lebanon Valley 
vs. Ursinus, Collegeville. 

Friday, Ivlarch 8— Franklin & Mar- 
shall vs. Gettysburg, Gettysburg. 

Saturday, March 9— Albright vs. Leb- 
anon Valley, Lebanon. 



Gale— There are my grandma's ashes 
over there. 

Grace— Oh, so the poor soul has 
passed on? 

Gale — No, she was just too lazy to 
look for the ash tray. 



"I suppose you regard all your display 
of eloquence as beneficial to the cause?" 

"Well," replied the Senator, "to be 
candid, that eloquence isn't so much for 
the cause as for the effects." 



A Frenchman came to London to learn 
the language, and soon got into difficul- 
ties with his pronunciation, especially 
with the group comprising "though, 
plough, and rough." 

When the film "Cavalcade" began to 
run and one newspaper review was head- 
ed "Cavalcade Pronounced Success," the 
Frenchman went back home. 



Defend me from my friends: I can de- 
fend myself from my enemies. 



Leisey: I did it in ten sittings. 
Loos: In ten sittings? Are you hav- 
ing your portrait painted? 

Leisey: No, I learned to ice skate. 



Modern Nursery rhymes: 

Hickory, dickory dock 

The mouse ran up the clock 

The clock struck one 

The mouse went out to lunch. 

Baa, baa black sheep 
Have you any wool? 
What do you think I got— 
Feathers? 



Louise Stoner says: "Some men can't 
be trusted. The others are busted." 



In another generation or two, Ameri- 
can girls will be marrying European no- 
blemen for the money that the noblemen 
married American girls for. 



Sandt: What part of the body is the 
fray? 

Tony: Fray? What are you talking 
about? 

Sandt: This book says that Ivanhoe 
was wounded in the fray. 



To whom it may concern: 
"In Case You've Wondered" 

He says that every girl he knows 

By idiotic questions shows 

She has no brains, though many charms 
Enhance her. 

Young man, each girl from babyhood 

Is taught she never, never should 

Ask any man a question he 
Can't answer. 

J. M. 




prThceAlbert 

THE NATIONAL JOY SMOKE ! 



PAGE FOUR 



LA VIE COLLEGIENNE, THURSDAY, JANUARY 17, 1935 





FOR BREAKFAST 




For That In-Between Drink 




For Your Evening Bite 




. . . meet at . . . 


THE PENNWAY 



Freshman Theme 



LITERARY ANTECEDENTS 



By VIOLETTE HOERNER 



Ever since I was old enough to under- 
stand fairy tales, books have played an 
important part in my life. During the 
period when I was unable to interpret 
the printed words for myself, anyone 
who would read to me was my life-long 
friend. In my collection there was a book 
entitled "Children's Tales," which I faith- 
fully loved for better or worse. Every 
time my mother, expecting to rest her 
weary bones for a moment, would settle 
cosily in her favorite chair, into the room 
would prance the modern version of Hip- 
pias with an expectant gleam in her eye 
and incidentally with the volume of 
"Children's Tales" tucked under her 
arm. From this book my mother read 
until she was so hoarse she could barely 
whisper to plead for mercy. And the 
stories she read? Oh, yes, there was 
"Little Red Riding Hood," "Rip Van 
Winkle," "Sleeping Beauty," "The Ugly 
Duckling," "Little Black Lambs," "Cin- 
derella," and many others. Of these my 
favorite was "Cinderella." Her woes 
were to me the tragedies of a kingdom, 
and when Cinderella lived happily ever 
after I fairly glowed with goodwill. Since 
that time I have read, at the direction of 
termined English teacher, Shakes- 
peare's play "Julius Caesar", but I some- 
how could never see the death of Julius 
Caesar as plainly as the pumpkin being 
changed into a splendid, shining, jewel- 
bedecked coach equipped with a coach- 
man and footmen. Though Antony's 
speech was a famous work of literature, 
I must confess I enjoyed myself to a 
greater extent when Cinderella and I, 
dressed in fine gowns, went to the great 
ball where the handsome prince danced 
with us the whole evening. I remember 
how thrilled I was when the prince 
turned to us and said, with his best bow, 
"May I have this dance?" To be sure 
it was a three-cornered dance, but no- 
body except me knew that the prince and 
Cinderella weren't dancing alone. 

When I grew older and went to Sun- 
day School, I discovered one Sunday in 
the church school library a large set of 
books dealing with a heroine named El- 
sie Dinsmore. To the window I advanced 
and came away only after being girded 
with the first book of the series. There- 
after I read all there was to be read 
about Elsie Dinsmore, her trials and mis- 
fortunes, her triumphs and exultations. 
This is one of the books that influenced 
me most, for, on reading the series, I 
immediately became induced with a de- 
sire to be good and noble. Consequently 
there followed a period when I was prim 
and prudish, a goody-goody if you like, 
shockable to the nth degree and as con- 
scientious as the day was long. So earn- 
estly did I try to copy Elsie that in my 
humane spirit I became the class fool— 
that innocent person whose homework, 
class work, and tests everybody copies. 

Night after night I remained at home, 
perusing articles, dissecting the funda- 
mentals of the lessons assigned, answer- 
ing questions, translating Latin, writing 
compositions— in short harassing my 
brains in every conceivable manner by 
the light of the midnight taper. Solely 
for my benefit? No, indeed, 'twas for the 
good of all, for I would barely enter the 
school building when someone would ac- 
cost me, saying, "Oh, Violette, you're 
just the one I want to see. Have you 



JUNIOR ELECTION 



The junior class held an election of 
officers on January 14 in room 18. 
Since the treasurer, Cassell, is re- 
tained the entire year, only the fol- 
lowing were elected after a slight 
bickering about parliamentary regu- 
lations: President, Patrizio; vice-pres- 
ident, Rader; secretary, Weirick. 

After a short business meeting the 
group was adjourned. 



done your Latin?" Just then there arose 
in my mind two vivid pictures, one of 
the individual before me who I was cer- 
tain had thoroughly enjoyed herself the 
evening before at the latest picture of 
Joan Crawford, and another of myself 
and my Latin book at the hour of ten. 
The contrast was too marked. This time 
I would not yield. With a new resolu- 
tion formed, I opened my lips to refuse 
aid, when once again there came before 
my eyes the picture of Elsie Dinsmore 
smiling at me in a kindly manner, a no- 
ble soul, who urged me, nay forced me, 
to do my best. With a sigh I would 
meekly begin "I sing about arms and a 
hero, who first from the shores of Troy 

While in high school I was introduced 
to the mysteries of Shakespeare— that 
eminent English writer. Among the 
Shakesperian plays I read was "The 
Merchant of Venice" which I especially 
enjoyed because I discovered that 
Shakespeare was really a broad-minded 
fellow, who, contrary to many of the 
stronger sex of today, believed in giving 
credit where credit was due, even if it 
fell to a woman's lot. So much did I 
enjoy the play read under the direction 
of the English instructor that I requested 
a volume of the works of Shakespeare 
for a Christmas gift. To my everlasting 
credit I can confess that I voluntarily 
read "Romeo and Juliet," "The Tem- 
pest," "Merry Wives of Windsor," 
"King Lear," and "The Comedy of Err- 
ors." My conclusion, on reading these 
plays, was that Shakespeare was Al Ca- 
pone in disguise, for in no modern plays 
are quite so many villainous characters 
"taken for a ride" as in the last few acts 
of Shakespeare's tragedies. 

As for poetry, I like this simple expres- 
sion of everyday, unusual experiences 
and emotions. I enjoy the works of so 
many poets that it is impossible t<^ name 
any particular one as my favorite. How- 
ever, my favorite poems are "L'Envoi," 
"O Captain, My Captain," "Oppor- 
tunity," and "The Snowstorm." My pet 
aversion in poetry is the use of patriot- 
ism as subject matter. This is due to the 
influence of a loving history teacher, 
who compelled me to recite again and 
again "America for Me." Well as I re- 
member the flaunting of arms, the inflec- 
tion of the voice, and the fervency ne- 
cessary to deliver the poem. I also re- 
call that whenever I reached the lines, 
"Oh, it's home again, and home again, 
America for me," I was stopped by the 
exclamation "No! no!" And then that 
gray-haired specimen of true patriotism 
would clasp her hands above her heart, 
put her right foot fourteen and a half 
inches before her left one, and gaze soul- 
fully toward the ceiling (as black as my 
Sunday hat), with her nose tilted at just 
the right angle while exclaiming with all 
the vigor of the suppressed love of a 
mother for her child, "So it's home again, 
and home again, America for me!" By 
the time I was through learning and re- 



citing this lovely poem I wished that 
both this demon and her exasperating 
America were beyond my sight and 
hearing. 

As the books which hold particular in- 
terest for me at the present time are 
those written in the style of novels, but 
having a true historical background, I 
would like to read "All Quiet on the 
Western Front." Since I have nevei* 
read "Dr. Jekyll and Mr. Hyde" I would 
like to read this book for the excellent 
character sketch which I believe it con- 
tains. Because Paris of the nineteenth 
century has always fascinated me, I 
would like to read "Les Miserables." 
Last but not least, I would like to read 
the works of Jane Addams on socio- 
logical matters, because that side of life 
holds a great interest for me. Perhaps, 
after all these years, this is still Elsie 
Dinsmore's influence. Who knows? 



Campus Cuts 

Ask Louis Straub about that surprise 
Christmas gift he received from a certain 
Santa Claus, or maybe it was Mrs. San- 
ta, I don't know. Or better yet, try to 
figure out who received a letter from a 
girl asking the young, curly-haired se- 
nior for his "phonograph" because she 
thinks he's grown so handsome. "If I 
had a talking picture of you-oo." So-oo!! 



But this takes the gilded dishpan— It 
seems as though a certain gentleman of 
no mean distinction attended a dance re- 
cently where he met a fascinating fe- 
male. Immediately the young gallant be- 
came quite captivated, and his interest 
waxed strong, so strong, in fact, that he 
made inquiries as to her amorous ties. 
But, alas, her affections were already 
rooted deeply in another more worthy 
than he; so, in order to appease a dis- 
torted mind, the dejected suitor resorted 
to the well-known poetry of escape, and 
we found him murmuring: 

"The blonde in green, 

Though quite supreme, 

Rader thought was in the makin'; 

With a further bit of inquiry 

He became real weary, 

Because he found she was taken." 



Our private detectives report that the 
reason a certain loyal (?) Clionian was 
absent , from the meeting last Friday 
night is linked up in some mysterious 
fashion to a parked car— bearing the fa- 
miliar license plate SK7 which was seen 
in Lovers' Lane. We wonder if the fe- 
male's feet were cold. At it again, ju- 
niors. 



Denton has a cousin working for the 
HOLC who supplied him with some ex- 
cerpts of letters actually received by that 
body. Here we unveil some of them 
for your satisfaction. 

1. I am glad to report that my hus- 
band who was reported missing is now 
dead. 

2. I am writing to say my baby was 
born two years old, when do I get my 
money? 

4. I am sending my marriage certifi- 
cate and six children. I had seven. One 
died which was baptized on half a sheet 
of paper by Rev. Thomas. 



Riviera Restaurant 



Oysters and Crab Cakes 
Breyer s Ice Cream 



TOILET ARTICLES 

PATENT MEDICINES 
CIGARS - CIGARETTES 

ANDREW'S 
CUT RATE STORE 

OPPOSITE COURT HOUSE 

8th & cumberland sts. 

Lebanon. Pa. 
VISIT OVR FOUNTAIN 



4. You have changed my little boy to 
a girl. Will it make any difference? 

5. In answer to your letter I have giv- 
en birth to a boy weighing ten pounds. 
I hope this is satisfactory. 

6. My husband has been put in charge 
of the Spitoon (Platoon) so now do I 
get my money? 

7. In accordance with your instruc- 
tions I have given birth to twins in the 
enclosed envelope. 



A tip to those of you who are gastro- 
nomic experts or devotees. At your earli- 
est hunger take a trip to Shartlesville 
and order a dinner at the hotel. Here 
you will find an undreamed of heaven 
of tables laden with fifty (count 'em) 
different kinds of food. You have no 
choice in the matter but all fifty are 
placed before you. After that nothing 
else matters. 



Did you know that Paul Billett is a 
crooner of note, Ralph Billett an efficient 
moving man while John Gongloff is a 
dashing hero? All of these interesting 
sidelights into character came to light 
during the flood on the first floor of the 
men's dorm in the wee hours of Mon- 
day morning. Gongloff discovered water 
several inches deep in several places on 
the first floor; it was running along the 
halls, and down into the basement via 
the steps and through the ceiling. He 
promptly awoke that entire section of 
the building besides a goodly portion of 
the rest of it. When Paul Billett found 
the water seeping under his doorsill he 
burst forth with "River Stay Way from 
My Door." In response to the pleading 
tones of his voice the waters rose no 
further. What a voice, what power! 
Ralph, however, didn't have much faith 
in the magical powers of Paul's voice as 
he promptly began to empty the clothes 
closets and pile things on chairs, tables, 
etc. Other heroes dared the dripping 
basement to ascertain the extent of the 
damage while others attacked the source 
of the flood with success. After that ex- 
perience oars and life rafts should be 
made standard equipment for the rooms. 



Try ROEMIG'S 

25c LUNCH 

DELICIOUS SUNDAES 
With That Good Home-Made 
ICE CREAM 




The Logical Place for L. V. C. 
Students to Buy 

BOOKS & SUPPLIES 
ESBENSHADE'S 

38 N. 8th St., Lebanon, Pa. 



WALK ON AIR 

IN A PAIR OF 

Weyenberg-Massagic 
SHOES 
John Hirsh Dept. Store 



Books That Every 
Student Should Have 
In His Library 



Hartrampf's Vocabularies 
Synonyms — Antonyms- 
Relatives 

Roget's Thesaurus 

Outline of Man's Knowledge 
Crabbe's English Synonyms 

Useful Quotations 

Bartlett's Familiar Quotations 
The Modern Word Finder.. 



; 1.00 
1.00 
1.00 
1.00 
1.00 
1.49 
1.00 



BOLLMAN'S 



628 CUMBERLAND STREET 
LEBANON. PA. 



CENTRAL 
Shoe Repair Shop 

A Trial Will Convince You! 
FRANK DI NUNZIO, Prop. 



FOR QUALITY 



PATRONIZE 

FINK'S BAKERY 

MAIN STREET 



K L. Say lor & Son* 
CONTRACTORS 

LUMBER and COAL 
Annville, Pennsylvania 



Goodman Brothers 

SODA FOUNTAIN 



KREAMER BROS. 



Leonard Elec. Refrigerators 
Hoover Electric Sweeper* 
Easy Electric Washers 
Gas and Coal Stoves 
Rugs and Linoleums 



Furniture - - Undertaking 



Phone 14 4 annville. P a 



STUDENTS! 
Our Advertisers 

Appreciate 
Your Patronage 



CLOTHING OF QUALITY 

J. S. BASHORE 



LEBANON. PENNSYLVANIA 



PRINTIN^IINDINC CO 

WEBfATT/tf WORLD ON WS/f O/PDEfiS 
MAKE US PROVE /T 

LEBANON 740 WALTON 520 WASHINGTON REAPINCj 



Swell Hop, 
Sophs! 




Swell Tests, 
Profs? 



LEBANON VALLEY COLLEGE 



VOL. XI 



ANNVILLE, PENNSYLVANIA, THURSDAY, JANUARY 24, 1935 



No. 17 



L. V. Pinsters Have 
Four Faculty Teams 

UNIFORM REGULATIONS 



Messrs. Stevenson, Gingrich, 
Rutledge, Metoxin Head 
The Teams 



The faculty pinsters are apparently in 
dead earnest about this bowling situation, 
and have at last concluded that physical 
»s well as mental recreation is essential. 
An inter-faculty league has been orga- 
nized under capable supervision, teams 
have been chosen and placed under ac- 
tive captains, and a temporary schedule 
has been arranged. Four teams under 
the captaincy of Messrs. Stevenson of 
the Arts Department, Gingrich of the 
Business Administration section, Rutledge 
of the Musical department, and Chief 
Metoxen, representation of the athletic 
aggregation have been chosen, each ap- 
proximately of Telatively equal strength. 
Several of the pin-spillers have developed 
into rollers of no mean ability. Prof. 
Rutledge, despite his dimunition, is prob- 
ably one of the most capable, as is Prof. 
Gingrich. Percy Clements, after a slow 
start, has developed quite an eye, Prof. 
Reynolds shows signs of rapidly increas- 
ing ability, and Prof. Butterwick has up- 
held the threat of senility in pounding out 
some enviable scores. 

Because there are only two alleys in 
the Roemig recreation parlor, two teams 
clash from 7:30 to 9 p. m. Thursday eve- 
ning, while the remaining rivals meet at 
9 p. m. and conclude the evening's setto 
at 10:30. If one member is absent from 
any team, the opposing team rolls only 
the three highest men and the captain, 
thus making the contest more even. This 
(Continued on Page 3, Column 2) 



Debating Schedule 

Arranged For Girls 

The schedule for the girls' debating 
te am has recently been arranged. Five 
college teams are to compete with the 
Lebanon Valley group. These include 
Elizabethtown College on February 3, 
Ursinus College on February 20, West- 
on Maryland on February 25, Cedar 
Crest on March 4, and Penn State on 
March 18. All of these are dual debates 
w ith the exception of the Penn State de- 
hate when our affirmative team will meet 
their negative team who are on tour. 

The question for debate this season is 
Kesolved: that the nations should pre- 
Vent the international shipment of arms 
and munitions. This is one of the three 
^ Ue stions selected -by the debating con- 
gee at HarrisFurg last fall. 
, e negative side of the argument will 
e u Pheld by Louise Gillan, Marian Lei- 
x? y - and Winona Shroff while Grace 
au gle, Esther Flom, and Jean McKeag 



H 

Mil 

r Maintain the affirmative positions. 
° u ise Shearer who has been acting as 
» er has arranged the schedule. 



HTLTNER ELECTED 

TO LEAD SENIORS 



Room 18 was the recent scene of a 
fiery parliamentary discussion of the 
dignified senior class. This group met 
for the election of officers for the last 
semester. After several rather heated 
arguments the following officials were 
elected: President, George Hiltner; 
vice-president, Wilbur Shroyer; secre- 
tary, Catherine Wagner; and treasur- 
er, Kenneth Shaeffer. Former Presi- 
dent Arndt welcomed the new presi- 
dent, and Mr. Hiltner made a short 
but effective opening speech. 

It was decided to take definite ac- 
tion in the near future upon the possi- 
bilities of having a Senior Ball. Most 
of the class seemed very much in fa- 
vor of this suggestion. 



Cornwall H. S. 
Downs L. V. Frosh 



SHEESLEY HIGH SCORER 



Frosh Rally Late In Game Fails 
To Overcome Cornwall 
Advantage 



Cornwall High School, boasting one of 
its best basketball teams in many years, 
registered its seventh straight victory 
Saturday at the expense of Lebanon Val- 
ley's Freshman Five by the convincing 
score of 38-30. 

The Miners snared good lead in the 
first quarter, 11-5, but the Frosh rallied 
in the second period, with Sheesley lead- 
ing the way, and drew up to 15-all with 
ten seconds of the half remaining. A 
shot by Glovan as the half ended put 
Cornwall ahead by two points at inter- 
mission. The Miners stayed out in front 
at the beginning of the second half, but 
a late L. V. C. rally pulled them up to 
within two points of the Cornwall crew 
at 30-28. The Frosh attack bogged at 
this point and some spectacular shooting 
by the Miners in the last three minutes 
gave them a safe 8-point lead as the 
game ended. 

(Continued on Page 3, Column 2) 



STUDENT BODY 

TO HEAR LANUX 



Pierre de Lanux, world famous author 
and lecturer, who for ten years has 
served as director of the Paris office of 
the League of Nations, will deliver an 
address at Lebanon Valley College Mon- 
day, January 28 at eight o'clock. 

Lanux, who is touring the United 
States under the management of the In- 
ternational Relations Speakers Bureau, 
will deliver a lecture entitled "The Race 
Between War and Peace. " The speaker's 
tour Is being financed by the Carnegie 
Endowment for International Peace. No 
charge will be made for his appearance 

(Continued on Page 4, Column 3) 



HYPNOTISM INTERESTS 
PSYCHO LOGY STUDENTS 

DR. HULL MAKES SCIENTIFIC STUDY 

Three Groups of Hypnotic Subjects Known to World Only Possible 
By Power of Concentration and Suggestion — No After Ef- 
fects On Nervous Stability. 



By LESTER KRONE 
For the past year or so on our campus, 
there has been much evidenced interest 
in hypnotism, scientific and otherwise. 
For those who consider this phenomenon 
rather mystical and something to stare at 
with mouth agape at circus side-shows, 
fairs and the like, let it be known that 
there is nothing at all magical about it. 
Hypnotism has become a scientific fact, 
thanks to the many years of scientific 
experiment and research of Dr. Hull at 
Yale and many able assistants. As a re- 
sult of this work, a mass of literature has 
been published, containing scientific data 
which is altogether enlightening on the 
subject. The more important practical 
data follow: 

Of the sum total of all subjects experi- 
mented upon, Dr. Hull finds they are di- 
vided roughly into three groups: one 
third shows a positive non-susceptibility, 
another third are capable of entering any 
of the first three stages, or partial hyp- 



BOAKE CARTER 

JOINS BOARD 



Boake Carter, outstanding radio edi- 
torialist and commentator, has become a 
member of the Advisory Committee of 
the Radio Institute of the Audible Arts, 
it was announced today by Pitts San- 
born, director of the institute. Founded 
two months ago by the Philco Radio and 
Television Corporation as a public con- 
tribution, the Radio Institute of the Audi- 
ble Arts seeks to stimulate among the 
millions of listeners a more active appre- 
ciation of good radio programs. It aims 
to increase the discrimination of the pub- 
lic and to encourage the demand for the 
better things on the air. 

Other members on the Advisory Com- 
mittee who will cooperate with Mr. San- 
born are: Sigmund Spaeth, prominent 
writer, musician and lecturer; Miss Flo- 
rence Hale, distinguished educator, direc- 
tor of radio for the National Education 
Association, and editor-in-chief of "The 
Grade Teacher"; Dr. Levering Tyson, 
director of the National Advisory Coun- 
cil on Radio in Education; Professor Ly- 
man Bryson of Teachers College, Co- 
lumbia University, whose studies on the 
use of leisure time have won widespread 
attention; and Professor Peter W. Dy- 
kema, professor of music education at 
Teachers College, and member of the 
Board of Control of the Bureau for the 
Advancement of Music. 

The Advisory Committee will aid Mr. 
Sanborn in developing the comprehen- 
( Continued on Page 3, Column 2) 



♦ nosis, and the remaining third are capa- 
ble of entering the deepest amnesiatic 
stages. I say "capable," because it is the 
subject having the ability of profound 
concentration, who is the most suscep- 
tible. 

The power to be hypnotized is an en- 
tirely individual trait. There is nothing 
about it to determine the degrees of men- 
tal normality of a person. The data 
show a slight leaning of susceptibility 
toward intelligence and non-susceptibil- 
ity leaning toward the less intelligent, 
but this is not so evident that any con- 
clusions may be reached in either case. 

Experiment also shows that the ami- 
able are rather more susceptible than the 
temperamental and psychoneurotic, but 
here again caution must be used in com- 
ing to conclusions. The tendency is so 
slight as to offer very little if any corre- 
lation between the two traits as to the 
influence of hypnotism. 

As for the difference between suscep- 
tibility in sexes, it is shown as a rather 
curious fact that women are, one fifteenth 
of the difference between the stature of 
the two sexes, more susceptible than 
men. 

Before science took a hand, it was the 
commonly erroneous belief that the pow- 
er to hypnotize showed the presence of 
a terrific will-power, capable of battering 
down a weaker will, and holding it with- 
in its clutches. This belief has been dis- 
carded forever by science, because it is 
known that a person cannot possibly be- 
come hypnotized against his will, except 
in a few cases by post-hypnotic sugges- 
tion. That is, by a command given while 
(Continued on Page 3, Column 4) 



Quittie" Makes 

Steady Progress 



Upon being interviewed David Yake, 
editor of the 1935 college annual, an- 
nounced that work on the "Quittie" is 
progressing in fine style. The managers 
of the various departments and their as- 
sistants have been working over-time to 
make this the best issue in the history of 
the school. The photography contract 
has been awarded to Apeda Studios of 
New York, while the Telegraph Press 
of Harrisburg is doing the printing and 
engraving. This year's "Quittie," which 
Mr. Yake expects to have ready by May 
Day, is to contain a number of new and 
entertaining features, being a credit to 
the corps of earnest workers engaged in 
making up the book. 



PAGE TWO 



LA VIE COLLEGIENNE, THURSDAY, JANUARY 24, 1935 



Ha Viz (ioUegtmne 

ESTABLISHED 1925 



A weekly, publication by the Under- 
graduate Students of Lebanon 
Valley College 



EDITORIAL STAFF 

Helen Earnest, '35_._ Editor-in-Chief 

George Hiltner, '35. Associate Editor 

Richard Baus, '37..... Managing Editor 

David Yake, '30 Asst. Man. Editor 



REPORTORIAL STAFF 

Catherine Wagner, '3j 
Sylvia Evelev, '36 
Louise Gillan, '36 
Lester Krone, '36 
Marian Leisey, 36 
Maxine Earley, '37 

Grace Naugle, '37 General Reporters 

Ida K. Hall, '35 Conservatory 

William Earnest, '37.... Athletics 

Miriam Eichner. '37 Alumni 

Louis Straub, '37 Philokosmian 

Charles Hauck, '35 _ Kalozetean 

Jane Shellenberger, 36 Clionian 

Marietta Ossi, '35 Delphian 

BUSINESS STAFF 

Kenneth Sheaffer, '35 Business Manager 

Albert Anderson, '36...Asst. Bus. Manager 

Robert Cassel, '36 Circulation Manager 

Elwood Needy, '37 Asst. Cir. Manager 



Single Copies.. 
Subscription...... 



5 cents 

..$1.00 per year 



Entered at the Annville, Pa., post 
office as second class matter, under the 
Act of March 3, 1879. 



THURSDAY, JAN. 24, 1935 



BEHIND THE SCENES 



In the issue of January 17 the senior 
staff members of the La Vie Collegienne 
put into practise a policy started by Ed- 
mund Umberger, editor-in-chief for the 
school year of 1933-1934. The principal 
idea is to place the responsibility for the 
production of several issues upon the 
shoulders of the under-classmen. Juniors 
are given the leadership as a means of 
preparation for future newspaper work. 
For in several months this group must as- 
sume the spring compilation of the stu- 
dent publication. Last year the Christ- 
mas number and several other issues 
were the production of these junior ef- 
forts. The amateur pressmen spent much 
time in learning the fundamentals of copy 
reading, the art of head-lining, and the 
strange pleasures derived from proof- 
reading and the physical make-up of an 
issue. To prowl down a dark alley to 
Boyer's Printing office, to stumble over 
strange packages in the shop, to return 
home smeared with ink and glue— these 
are sensations not common to every Leb- 
anon Valley student. 

The editorial staff last week consisted 
of Lester Krone,, Maxine Earley, and 
Miriam Eichner. It was their duty to 
call a meeting of the staff, make the 
weekly assignments, collect the written 
material, and write the editorial. An- 
other committee consisting of Sylvia 
Evelev, Marian Leisey, and Louis Straub 
worked on the headlines, planned the 
columns, and did the copy-reading. The 
unfortunate part of this plan is that there 
are no arrangements made for the busi- 
ness and managing sections of the staff. 
They continue with their same duties 
with little or no change in the responsi- 
bility for these two phases of the work. 
The senior editorial members act as an 
advisory board and also cooperate by 
submitting articles for the junior publi- 
cation. 

This method of sharing the main bur- 
den, of shifting the responsibility on sev- 
eral occasions, should teach these young- 
er staff members the fundamentals of col- 




CATHERINE S. WAGNER 

Heigho, Cappy! Here's to Delphian's 
opening president, an all-round student, 
and a delightful friend. As just another 
Reynold's neophyte we daily see her 
strolling to Annville High School to stuff 
the parts of speech into freshmen heads. 



We shall always remember her as a 
shining dramatic light of the campus with 
outstanding roles in "She Stoops to Con- 
quer," "Hayfever," and "Candida." She 
was also a member of the 1935 Quitta- 
pahilla staff, and at present she is a faith- 
ful "La Vie" reporter — with a special 



keenness for writing accounts of kids' 
parties and autumn hikes. 

One can see her beaming countenance 
behind the library desk as she doles out 
reference material to the book-loving stu- 
dent mobs. Now an inmate of West Hall, 
we see her frequently making a last-min 
ute dash from her domicile to the "ad' 
building in an effort to be on time for 
classes. 

Here's the best of luck and happiness 
to a jolly girl, one who has a keen sense 
of humor and who is always loyal! We 
salute you, Catherine Lillian Wagner. 



lege newspaper work. Naturally many 
criticisms are focused on this publication 
— unkind remarks from students and out- 
siders—but with the cooperation of staff 
and student body we shall somehow man- 
age to overcome these dintculties. As a 
closing request we would like individual 
students to surrender material of special 
interest to the La Vie Collegienne. All 
articles will be given individual attention 
and special notice in the weekly issue. 




BEYOND CfcMFUS 



At Iowa State Teachers College they 
have a unique dance called "Femmes 
Fancy." The dance is held once a year, 
and the rules which govern the frolic 
make it a momentous event in a co-ed's 
life. The girls must: 

f. Ask the man for the date and buy 
the tickets. 

2. Buy gas for the automobile. (If 
she has one, the girl should use her own). 

3. Call for the boy-friend. (Ring the 
door-bell and wait for him, if he isn't on 
the dot). 

4. Check his hat and coat at the 
dance. 

5. Carry his comb and cigarettes if 
he so desires. 

6. Be sure he has a variety of part- 
ners throughout the evening. 

7. Extend any other courtesies neces- 
sary to a complete evening. 



From the same institution come re- 
ports that in an interview of the faculty 
it was gleaned that the following attri- 
butes were usually possessed by those 
students who made the honor roll. The 
honor student: 

1. Does not swallow everything told 



to him even by his instructor. 

2. Does nothing that will injure his 
health. 

3. Has average or better than average 
intelligence. 

4. Is willing to work. 

5. Is genuinely interested in some- 
thing, preferably his subject. 

6. Keeps posted on the news of the 
day. 

7. Budgets his time so that he has 
time for work and time for play. 

8. Has ability to think and uses it. 

9. Contributes something worthwhile 
to class discussion. 

10. Does not wait to be told what to 
do. 

11. Pays close attention in class. 

12. Has definite purpose in life. 

13. Has his own opinions and stands 
by them. 

14. Cooperates with students and in- 
structors. 

15. Has command of the English lan- 
guage boih written and oral. 

16. Participates in extra-curricular ac- 
tivities. 

17. Is cheerful in class. 



The five most heavily-endowed uni- 
versities in this country are: Harvard, 
Yale, Columbia, Chicago, and the Uni- 
versity of Rochester. 



If a girl at Northwestern has a boy 
friend at home or on another campus, she 
advertises the fact to the world in gen- 
eral and Northwestern men in particular 
by wearing a little yellow ribbon on her 
dress and joining the Cloister Club. 



WEDDING BELLS 

FOR ALUMNi 



Miss Fredericka Baker '29 and Fran- 
ci : Y etter of Steelton were married De- 
T er 22, 1934, in the Reformed Church 
at Hummelstown. The bride is a teacher 
in t'le Tower City High School. The 
bridegroom, a graduate of Dickinson 
College, is a member of the faculty of 
the South Fork High School. 



Announcement has been made of the 
~r.g.--.gement of Miss Kathryn Harper 
Nisrley, '25, to Ira R. Herr of Elizabeth- 
town. Miss Nissley is a teacher in the 
• lizabethtown High School. Mr. Herr 
who was graduated from Elizabethtown 
and Franklin and Marshall Colleges is 
proprietor of a shoe store in Elizabeth- 
town and coach of athletics at Eliza- 
bethtown College. 



The engagement of Miss Marion Hoff- 
man, '29, to the Rev. Arthur D. Knoebel 
of Marietta was announced recently. 
Since graduation from Lebanon Valley 
:he bride-to-be has been teaching in the 
Cornwall High School. The Rev. Mr. 
Knoebel was graduated from Franklin 
and Marshall College and from the Re- 
formed Theological Seminary at Lancas- 
ter. He is pastor of the Marietta-May- 
town parish of the Reformed Church. 



Announcement has been made of the 
engagement of Miss Emalyn Weiss of 
Lebanon and Gardner Thrall Saylor, '32. 



At a bridge luncheon given recently 
by Mrs. Andrew Bender of the Conserv- 
atory of Music faculty at her home iri 
East Maple street, the announcement of 
the engagement of her niece, Miss Mary 
Elizabeth Engle, '32, to Lester Frederick 
Wa gner of Palmyra, was made. Miss 
Engle is a teacher in the Derry Town- 
ship Schools, while her fiance who was 
graduated from Gettysburg College is an 
electrical engineer. 



The engagement of Miss Kathryn E. 
Kreamer of Annville to Earl S. Rice, '34, 
has been announced. 



Announcement was made on New 
Year's Day of the engagement of Mrs. 
Anna Smyser Armstrong of Harrisburg 
i nd Elmer Eshleman, '26. Mr. Eshleman 
is employed in the advertising depart- 
ment of the Bell Telephone Company at 
Reading. 



President's Calendar 



Thursday, Jan. 24— Address to the 
student body and faculty of Car- 
lisle High School. 
Friday, Jan. 25— Meeting of the Penn- 
sylvania College Presidents Asso- 
ciation at the Penn-Harris hotel, Har- 
risburg. 

Monday, Jan. 28— Meeting of the 
Pennsylvania Council of Churches 
in Harrisburg. 

Tuesday, Jan. 29— Address to Men's 
Bible class of the Sixth Street 
United Brethren Church in Harris- 
burg. 

Address to Young Men's Christian 
Association, Harrisburg. 
Saturday, Feb. 2— Meeting of the 

New York and New Jersey Alumni 
Association. 

Sunday, Feb. 3— Sermon in East 
Orange, New Jersey. 



LA VIE COLLEGIENNE, THURSDAY, JANUARY 24, 1935 



PAGE THREE 



SPORT SHOTS 

Since the last issue of La Vie, three 



league 



basketball games have been 



played- Muhlenberg won two games, de- 
feating Albright, 43-36, and Franklin & 
Marshall, 37-34. Gettysburg kept apace 
w ith the Mules by defeating Drexel, 
34-27. 



The present standing of the league: 

W. L. Pet. 

Muhlenberg 3 1.000 

Gettysburg 3 1.000 

F. & M 1 1 .500 

Ursinus 1 1 .500 

Drexel 1 2 .333 

Lebanon Valley 2 .000 

Albright 3 .000 



Games coming up this week include 
Drexel - F. & M. at Lancaster, and Get- 
tysburg - Lebanon Valley at Lebanon. 



Muhlenberg's quintet is expected to 
go places in the league this year, and the 
recent 37-34 victory over F. & M. serves 
notice that pre-season dopesters sized up 
the situation pretty well. Cuchran and 
Lepore, the Mule forwards, are veterans 
of last year's campaign, as is Rodgers, 
one of the guards. Leibensperger, regu- 
lar center, is a transfer student from 
Temple and seems to be a better than 
average ball player. The fifth starter, 
Skrovanek, is a new man. 



A word might be said here about the 
league teams who have not yet opposed 
the Flying Dutchmen on the court. 



The Ursinus Bears boast of five vete- 
rans—forwards, Heiges, Calvert, and 
Covert; guards Greenawalt, and center, 
Johnson. All saw considerable service last 
year. The Gettysburg Bullets beat the 
Collegeville outfit, 36 to 32— not a dis- 
graceful score in any league. 



Drexel also has a veteran combination. 
Followers of last year's outfit seeing the 
1935 lineup would recognize the names 
of Raynes, Hoff. Wallace, Kline, and 
Knapp. 

Albright's aggregation also sounds 
^ U1 te familiar. Do you remember Shipe, 
W oods, Sutcliffe, and Slack? I don't 
d oubt but that you do. Iatesta and Os- 
lislo are among the missing, and cannot 
e counted out so early in the season. 

We have already witnessed the 
^ength of Gettysburg and F. 6 M. so 
^ at this Central Pennsylvania Collegiate 

ea gue is certainly going to be a close 
e ' with the winner deserving what- 
ever laurels it gains. 



0n - 1 lose yourselves in exams so 
j^h that you forget the L. V. C.-Get- 
Vsburg scrap scheduled for Saturday 
■ The Flying Dutchmen, having op- 
e °- the Bullets once and given them 
M lte a battle, have improved their offense 
atta defense to c °P e with the Gettysburg 
th'^k anc * are no P in 9 to 9 et back in the 
, lck of the fight by upsetting the 1934 
ai flps. 



f nc ^ en tally, did you notice the galaxy 
M a V ?!r ranS on the Bullet varsity? Cico, 
ma n '" an ' ^ orris ' Kozma, and Sass- 
ly ^ ere a H either regulars or frequent- 
f 0r ^ ed sut >s last year, and Fish, stellar 
aft e ar< ** m °ved right in at a varsity post 
f gaining valuable experience on the 
Shma n five last year. 



CORNWALL HIGH SCHOOL 
DOWNS L. V. C. FROSH 

(Continued from Page One) 

Sheesley was the outstanding perfor- 
mer for the Frosh, while Glovan and 
Savant were the leading lights in Corn- 
wall's brilliant attack. 

CORNWALL HIGH SCHOOL 

G. F. T. 

Adams, f 1 2 

Weik f 3 1 7 

Savant, c 4 2 10 

Light, g 2 4 

Glovan, g 7 1 15 

Totals 17 4 38 

LEBANON VALLEY FRESHMEN 

G. F. T. 

Billett, f 2 4 

Sheesley, f 8 16 

Tindall, f 1 1 3 

Shenk, f 1 1 

Aungst, c 1 1 

Seaks, c 

Kroske, g 

Carchidi, g 

Rozman, g 1 1 3 

Klipa, g 1 2 

Totals 13 4 30 

Referee— Jones. 



L. V. PINSTERS HAVE 

FOUR FACULTY TEAMS 



(Continued from Page One) 



and other regulations have been set up 
to make the organization more uniform, 
and to avoid any dispute over the make- 
up of the teams and the procedure of the 
games. 

The personnel of the teams, and the 
temporary schedule carried out so far is 
as follows : 

Team No. 1 — Stevenson, Capt., Ben- 
der, Clements, Grimm, Reynolds. 

Team No. 2 — Gingrich, Capt., Bailey, 
Stonecipher, Wagner, Wallace. 

Team No. 3 — Rutledge, Capt., Car- 
mean, Lynch, Stokes, Struble. 

Team No. 4— Metoxen, Capt., Butter- 
wick, Frock, Richie, Shenk. 

Date 7:30-9:00 9:00-10:30 

Dec. 6, 1934 1 and 2 3 and 4 

Dec. 13, 1934 3 and 4 1 and 2 

Jan. 3, 1935 2 and 3 1 and 4 

Jan. 10, 1935 1 and 4 2 and 3 

Jan. 17, 1935 1 and 3 2 and 4 

Jan. 24, 1935 2 and 4 1 and 3 



BOAKE CARTER 

JOINS 



BOARD 



(Continued from Page One) 



ive program of the institute. It will also 
ildvise in the preparation of publications 
intended to broaden the sphere and quick- 
en a desire on the part of the listening 
audience for the better type programs. 
Helpful manuals that will add to the en- 
joyment of programs, articles and talks 
that may be used as the basis for lec- 
tures and group discussions on subjects 
relating to the future of radio culturally, 
and various syllabi that will instruct on 
ways to use the radio — these are some of 
the projects on which the directors will 
seek the advice and counsel of the mem- 
bers of the Advisory Committee. 

As a broadcaster to whom millions 
turn nightly to listen to his gifted inter- 
pretation of what has been happening in 
the world, Boake Carter may be counted 
upon to contribute valuable suggestions, 
especially in the field of current events 
and contemporary talks. 

As a journalist, Mr. Carter travelled 
to almost every country in the world in 



SAAR SLIDES SHOWN 

TO GERMAN CLUB 



The German Club held its regular 
meeting on Thursday, January 12. 
Because of the inclement weather the 
audience, although highly apprecia- 
tive, was unusually small. The pro- 
gram consisted of slides about the 
Saar district and winter sports with a 
lecture in German given as explana- 
tion. The club members were highly 
entertained by Miss Lietzau's remini- 
scences when the pictured scenes had 
been witnessed in past travels. She 
abo intends to see many interesting 
spots in her planned trip this summer. 



HYPNOTISM INTERESTS 

PSYCHOLOGY STUDENTS 



[Continued from Page One) 



search of news and adventure. He be- 
gan his radio career in 1930, broadcast- 
ing his editorial comments locally over 
WCAU, Philadelphia. He first received 
national recognition as a radio editorial- 
i3t when he was assigned to Hopewell at 
the time of the Lindbergh kidnapping 
case. Since then he has occupied a com- 
manding position in his field. 

In announcing the formation of the Ad- 
visory Committee, Mr. Sanborn said that 
he planned to enlarge it to include men 
and women prominent in such fields as 
international relations, civic education, 
college education, and children's enter- 
tainment. 

Mr. Sanborn called attention to the 
fact that the institute, which maintains 
its headquarters at 80 Broadway, New 
York, welcomes suggestions for specific 
rctivities that it might undertake to fur- 
ther the broad plans of the founders. 



the subject is still under the effects of 
hypnosis. The whole phenomenon is made 
possible by the power of concentration 
and suggestion. 

Hypnotism has its practical uses. For 
instance, there have been known cases of 
curer, worked for worry, also smoking, 
drug, and alcohol habits, stage-fright and 
similar experiences, sea-sickness, and 
memory recall. However, in this latter 
ca c e it is rather curious to know that this 
can be done only on things below the 
normal level of recall in the more recent 
temporarily memorized things. The rea- 
son for this is unknown, but it is a fact 
nevertheless. 

As for after-effects, there is no evi- 
dence at all that hypnotism produces an 
after-effect on the nervous stability and 
personality of the subject. On the con- 
trary, as has been cited above, nervous 
conditions through worry have been al- 
layed by post-hypnotic suggestion. 

So, from now on, gentle reader, if you 
see any demonstrations in hypnotism you 
should know that either subject and 
"master" are "faking," or it is a scien- 
tific experiment. It certainly is not a 
pleasant idea to think of Dr. Bailey or 
any other student in this field of psy- 
chology as a Svengali. 



Krone: "Sam, lend me a dollar, and 
I'll be eternally indebted to you." 

Harnish: "That's what I'm- afraid of." 



He: "Is that you, darling?" 
She: "Yes, who is this?" 



Betty: "I met your sister on the street 
the other day. She looks shorter." 

Paul: "Yes, she's got married, and is 
settling down." 



SAINT JOHNSBURY ACADEMY 

Saint Johnsbury, Vermont 

An Old New England Academy in an Old New England Town. Thorough 
preparation for college. Commercial courses. Dormitories for boys and girls. 
Tuition $550 covers all expenses. Scholarship aid for worthy boys and airls. 
WRITE PRINCIPAL STANLEY R. OLDHAM. L. V. C. 08 



cut the 
gordian knot 

Away with this uncertainty! 
If she doesn't write, tele- 
phone and find out why. The 
trifling cost of a telephone 
call — even to distant points 
— is little enough when it 
puts an end to waiting 
around for news! 

I Call 100 miles for 60 cents by 
Day Rate; for 50 cents by 
Evening Rate; for 35 cents by 
Night Rate. (Station to Station 
calls — 3-minute connections.) 



The Bell Telephone Company of Pennsylvania 



No. 16 



PAGE FOUR 



LA VIE COLLEGIENNE, THURSDAY, JANUARY 24, 1935 




FOR BREAKFAST 
For That In-Between Drink 
For Your Evening Bite 

• • • meet at • • • 



THE PENNWAY 



Methods Courses 

For New Semester 



Beginning with the coming semester, 
the college is offering several new 
courses for juniors and seniors. They are 
two hour courses in methods, and are of- 
fered in specific fields of teaching^biol- 
ogy, chemistryT English, French, Ger- 
man, Latin, mathematics, and the social 
studies. Two or three will be offered 
each semester and in summer school. 
Every major should at some time or 
other take these specialized courses, for 
although they do not come under the re- 
quirements of the Pennsylvania teaching 
laws they are required by many other 
neighboring states, and tend to be con- 
sidered important by those states not al- 
ready having them. 

A new course was adopted for music 
students, educational psychology 23-A. 
Educational biology is a pre-requisite for 
this course. 



Campus Cuts 



In a recent philosophical conversation, 
two of our intelligensia were discussing 
life. Jagnesak seemed well-versed on the 
subject and biffed off at a great rate. The 
more serious-minded Krone informed 
Tony that "one doesn't know life until 
one has loved and lost." We feel sure 
that Tony has not yet suffered the heart- 
rending pangs of the lost love but where 
does "Red" get his information about 
life? Has cruel experience touched our 
innocent youth's pure brow? 



Frankie Boran declares he was the in- 
spiration for the song hit "The Object of 
My Affection Can Change My Complex- 
ion from White to Rosy Red." At least 
all indications pointed to this conclusion 
at a recent noon meal. His calm white 
physiognomy became a ball of fire at a 
mere suggestion. Remember, Frankie, 
blushing is a sign of emotional instability. 



It is a shame more of us could not 
have enjoyed that bathing beauty show 
that came off in South Hall recently. It 
was more than a contest that came off; 
I believe— it was the bathing suit of an 
innocent sandy-haired freshman. 



The sophs certainly must have been on 
the job selling tickets for their hop. We 
noticed a number of new faces down at 
the high school. Congratulations, Hart- 
man, on your selection and on your ap- 
pearance. 



Hear ye, hear ye, a certain dark, cur- 
ly-haired frosh from West Hall with 
mischievous eyes admits that "she isn't 
bad in the dark." Have you never heard, 
freshmen, the old adage, "Never commit 
yourself"? 



There is another epidemic on the 
campus. To those of us who remember 
the scarlet fever episode, we realized the 
seriousness of such a condition. Beware, 
stop, look, and listen— don't let it get 
you! If any one walks up to you and 
inquires whether you have a pen, pencil, 
or match, say no. Don't bite as did the 
junior from Long Island who bravely an- 
swered "You hold too tight," or the se- 
nior from up Erie way who calmly ad- 
mitted that "he got it." 



The La Vie Collegienne has conducted 
its own popularity contest. The school 
is fortunate in that we have been able 
to publish the results of this contest be- 
fore the Quittie could publish theirs. 

Best-looking girl on the campus— "Ag- 
gie." 

Best-looking man on the campus— Bert 
Gingrich. 

Biggest athletics foot girl— "Ivy." 
Biggest athletics foot man— "Jockey." 
Best dressed girl— "Rosie." 
Best dressed man— "Dad" Sellers. 
Best leadership girl— Sandy Hall. 
Best leadership man— Prof. Rutledge. 



Gleanings from the Chem Lab final 
exam: 

Calorie— the third balcony in a the- 
atre. 

Atom— the first man. 
Barium— what they do to dead people. 
Copper— a policeman. 
Zinc— something you wash dishes in. 
Gold— a disease you get in the winter. 
Antimony— what a divorced guy pays 
to his former wife. 



Ring around the bathtub 
Fourteen inches high, 
Four and twenty boarders 
All as sore as I. 
When the door is opened, 
The bird that leaves the ring 
Is going to be as sad a sight 
As the guy who used to sing. 



Goodman Brothers 

SODA FOUNTAIN 



Riviera Restaurant 

Oysters and Crab Cakes 



Breyer's Ice Cream 



TOILET ARTICLES 

PATENT MEDICINES 
CIGARS - CIGARETTES 

ANDREW'S 
CUT RATE STORE 

OPPOSITE COURT HOUSE 

8TH & CUMBERLAND STS. 

Lebanon. Pa. 
VISIT OUR FOUNTAIN 



STUDENT BODY 

TO HEAR LANUX 



(Continued from Page One) 



at Lebanon Valley College. His services 
have been procured by the Lebanon Val- 
ley College International Relations Club 
which is affiliated with the national or- 
ganization. The local group operates un- 
der the direction of Dr. E. H. Steven- 
son, head of the department of history. 

M. de Lanux has delivered over four 
hundred and fifty lectures on inter- 
national affairs since 1928. His reper- 
toire includes such subjects as "Europe 
Looks at the New America," "How to 
Read the Foreign News," "Wanted: A 
25 Year Plan for World Economy,"" 
"Trends of Modern Youth in France," 
and "The Race Between War and 
Peace." In addition to being a speaker 
of note, Lanux has also written a number 
of books dealing with both European 
and American problems. He has also 
been a generous contributor to the lead- 
ing periodicals of both continents. His 
visit to this section is being looked for- 
ward to with a great deal of interest and 
his lecture is regarded as one of the edu- 
cational high lights of the season. 



Books That Every 
Student Should Have 
In His Library 



Hartrampf's Vocabularies 
Synonyms — Antonyms- 
Relatives $1.00 

Roget's Thesaurus 1.00 

Outline of Man's Knowledge 1.00 

Crabbe's English Synonyms 1.00 

Useful Quotations 1.00 

Bartlett's Familiar Quotations 1.49 

The Modern Word Finder.. 1.00 



BOLLMAN'S 

628 CUMBERLAND STREET 
LEBANON. PA. 



For Recreation, Try 

ROEMIG'S 

BILLIARDS and BOWLING 



"Always Reliable" 




Clothes 



KREAMER BROS. 



Leonard Elec. Refrigerators 
Hoover Electric Sweepers 
Easy Electric Washers 
Gas and Coal Stoves 
Rugs and Linoleums 



Furniture - - Undertaking 



Phone 14 4 ANNVILLE, PA. 



CENTRAL 
Shoe Repair Shop 

A Trial Will Convince You! 
FRANK DI NUNZIO, Prop. 



FOR QUALITY 

Baked Products 

PATRONIZE 

FINK'S BAKERY 

MAIN STREET 



The Logical Place for L. V. C. 
Students to Buy 

BOOKS & SUPPLIES 
ESBENSHADE'S 

38 N. 8th St., Lebanon, Pa. 



D. L. Say lor & Sons 
CONTRACTORS 

LUMBER and COAL 
Annville, Pennsylvania 



WALK ON AIR 

IN A PAIR OF 

Weyenberg-Massagic 
SHOES 
John Hirsh Dept. Store 



STUDENTS! 
Our Advertisers 

Appreciate 
Your Patronage 



CLOTHING OF QUALITY 

J. S. BASHORE 



LEBANON, PENNSYLVANIA 



printinI^%indinc CO 

WEBfAT T/ff WOQUTOM WS/f ORD£#S 
MAKE US PROVE /T 

LEBANON 740 WALTON 520 WASHINGTON READING j 



Congrats 
Delphian 



LEBANON V ALLEY COLLEGE 



Good Luck 
Glee Club 



VOL. XI 



ANNVILLE, PENNSYLVANIA, THURSDAY, FEBRUARY 14, 1935 



No. 18 



Lanux Interests 
Group with Speech 
On World Peace 



FRENCHMAN VISITS L. V. C. 



Author and Peace Advocate 
Sent to Colleges By Rocke- 
feller Foundation 



Those students who neither let their 
studies interfere with their education, nor 
allow cramming to spoil their learning, 
enjoyed a rare privilege in the middle of 
the exam period. 

By the cooperation of Lebanon Val- 
ley's International Relations Club with 
the Rockefeller Peace Foundation, Mon- 
sieur Pierre de Lanux was brought to 
the campus for lectures and discussion. 
Because of Monsieur Lanux' ability and 
knowledge many among the student 
body, faculty, and friends were willing 
to lay aside their work to listen to him 
and talk with him. Monsieur Lanux has 
gained considerable fame as an author 
and peace advocate, and is a leader in 
the French League of Nations group. 
Just now he is doing work in America 
for a French newspaper, and because of 
his intimate knowledge of international 
questions has been sent over the United 
States to speak to college gatherings by 
the Rockefeller Foundation. 

In the afternoon he met the club and 
a few other interested ones in Philo hall 
and there chatted rather informally. Be- 
ing asked about French students, the 
speaker explained their problems and in- 
terests. All were consoled to their trials 
by the information that French students 
have 45 hours of classes beside evening 
practice and compulsory interrogations. 
The speaker further explained that they 
have very limited social life and their 
ideas and associations are the results of 

(Continued on Page 4, Column 1 ) 



Consolation Ball 



Clio wishes to invite you to "open 
house" Saturday night in the alumni 
gymnasium. Young and old are wel- 
come. For one thin dime to help to 
defray the orchestral expenses you 
can dance on the campus, while the 
Delphian damsels and their partners 
for the evening sway to the rhythmic 
strains of Lloyd and Lloyd's orches- 
tra. The Clionians do not promise 
Isham Jones or Hal Kemp, but music 
of some sort will be provided. 

This may be termed a "Consolation 
Ball," so all stranded individuals put 
on your dancing slippers and trip to 
the Clionian music providers. Chape- 
rones will be present, so there will be 
SO need to fear improper conduct. Jane 
Shellenberger, the new vice-president, 
Promises a spectacular floor show, so 
cheer up, smile, and come to Clio's in- 
formal party, Saturday, dancing from 
8:00 to 11:30. We thank you. 



'Y" Tea For Seniors 



The girls of the senior class were 
the guests of the Y. W. C. A. at a 
tea held in their honor on Wednes- 
day afternoon, February 6. The tea 
was held in North Hall parlor where 
the girls of the sophomore "Y" cabi- 
net served. Grace Naugle acted as 
hostess. The afternoon was spent 
with much gaiety, as the girls found 
amusement in the new game Kriss- 
Kross. Other guests were Mrs. Lynch. 
Mrs. Wallace, Miss Meyers, and Mrs. 
Green. 



L.V. Beats Bears; 
Muhlenberg Wins 

BASKETEERS SPLIT EVEN 



Program and Dance 
Enjoyed By Guests 
Of Kalo and Clio 



GYMNASIUM IS DECORATED 



Art Zellers And His Band Fur- 
nish Music For the 
Evening 



Ursinus Defeated By Score Of 
41-37; Mules Victorious, 
37-29 



In their last two starts the Lebanon 
Valley basketeers have shown highly 
improved form. The first court victory 
of the year was registered at the expense 
of the highly-regarded Ursinus quintet 
and in the last encounter the league- 
leading Muhlenberg Mules were given a 
real tussle before the Flying Dutchmen 
succumbed by a 37-29 count. 

The L. V. C. courtsters went out at 
intermission with a lead over their oppo- 
nents for the first time this year in their 
meeting with the Ursinus Bears. A rally 
by the Collegevilie crew in the second 
half pushed them out in front, but the 
Blue and White boys came back strong 
in the closing minutes to register a 41-37 
victory. Pat Patrizio and Bill Smith led 
the Valley scoring with eleven points 
apiece, seven of the latter 's being count- 
ed from the 15-foot line. Charlie Rust 
snared five field goals for 10 counters, 
and "Stew" Barthold added seven points. 
Calvert and Costello divided scoring hon- 
ors for the Bears with 10 points each. 

The Muhlenberg Mules stepped out 
in the first half of their game with the 
Blue and White quintet to snare a 13-10 
lead at intermission. They continued the 
pace into the second stanza and were 

(Continued on Page 2, Column 3) 



Clio and Kalo joined last Friday eve- 
ning to spend a most delightful evening. 
Members of the societies were first in- 
vited to Kalo hall where Mr. Harry 
Schwartz, the men's society president, 
after welcoming the guests introduced 
the program participants. 

The first performers included the 
two-piano team of Koch and Anderson. 
Very novelly they gave several popular 
numbers. Fext, Miss Sylva Harclerode 
phyed a duet," with mouth organ and 
piano- it is a perrortiian :e wcrth hear- 
irg. 

"Clio's jazz singer," Miss Maxine 
F.irly. v.-as SQtroduceJ tr. the guests and 
sang in the genuine blues style. This 
year's addition to Clio, Miss Mary Zart- 
man, told us all about "the trip to the 
city" and "George Washington's Truth- 
continued on Page 4, Column 2) 



Moravian Co-eds 
Down Leb. Valley 

SCORE END OF GAME 31-17 



First Defeat In Opening Game 
Displays Lack of Practise 
Of Kenyonites 



January 18 was the opening game for 
the L. V. co-eds on the home basketball 
floor. The opponent was Moravian Col- 
lege which gave the Valley girls a troun- 
cing, not because of their superiority, but 
due to the lack of practice of L. V. 

The Moravian girls showed excellent 
cooperation in their passes and plays, 
which were almost always successful. 
However, the L. V. fair damsels were 
loyal, good sports and went into the 

(Continued on Page 3, Column 4) 



Readers' Club Discusses Periodicals 



Readers' Club held its regular monthly 
meeting last Tuesday evening at the 
home of Dr. Wallace. The subject for 
the evening was centered around re- 
views, columns, and magazines. 

William Fetter gave a very thorough 
review of columns and columnists. He 
pointed out that the newspaper audience 
consisted of three groups — the intellec- 
tuals, the practical persons, and the non- 
intellectuals. The functions of a news- 
paper, according to the speaker, are to 
inform, to influence public opinion, and 
also to entertain. Mr. Fetter defined a 



column as a standing feature dealing 
with a regular sort of material by the 
same man. A good column consists of 
a strong feeling by the reader of the 
writer. It must be sufficiently good to 
create a following. It must present an 
opinion which is based on fact, or it must 
present its material in a human way. The 
column must give interesting information 
not already known. The style of the 
column must conform to general news- 
paper standards. It must please the news- 
paper public. 

There are various types of columns. 
The special columns are usually con- 
continued on Page 2, Column 2) 



Conference Meets 
On College Campus; 
Two Day Session 

CHAPEL SESSIONS HELD 



Bishop Batdorf Presiding Offi- 
cer of the East Bishop's 
Area 



The Educational Conference for the 
East Bishop's Area of the Church of the 
United Brethren in Christ was held at 
Lebanon Valley College on February 5 
and 6. This conference includes the Alle- 
gheny, East Pennsylvania, Erie, Florida, 
Pennsylvania, Virginia, and West Vir- 
ginia Conferences. The delegates repre- 
sented 1,032 active churches with an ap- 
proximate membership of 148,099, cov- 
ering the entire eastern section of the 
United States. 

Bishop G. D. Batdorf. Ph.D., Harris- 
burg, Pa., is the presiding officer of the 
East Bishops' Area. He opened the con- 
ference on February 5 with a devotional 
period, and delivered an address, "Min- 
isterial Education and the Seminary," in 
the evening session. Rev. Wade S. Mil- 
ler, Dean of Shenandoah College, Day- 
ton. Va., also spoke that evening on "A 
Liberal College Education for Personal 
Growth and Culture." 

Other speakers for the first day were 
President Clyde A. Lynch, Ph.D., of 
Lebanon Valley College; Rev. O. T. 
Deever, D. D., General Secretary of 
Christian Education; Rev. G. A. Ritchie, 
D. D., Professor of Bible and Greek at 
Lebanon Valley College; Rev. U. P. 
Hovermale, D. D., Superintendent of the 
Virginia Conference; Rev. J. Gordon 
Howard, D. D., Denominational Director 
of Young Peoples Work, and Rev. S. C. 
Enck, D. D., Superintendent of the East 
Pennsylvania Conference. There were 

(Continued on Page 3, Column 3) 



Afternoon Parties 

The Valley Vogue 

Dr. and Mrs. Lynch wish to an- 
nounce that they will be at home to 
the various class groups on the fol- 
lowing dates: 

February 20 has been designated 
for the entertainment of the dignified 
senior class. 

February 27 marks the afternoon 
out for the juniors. 

March 6 will mean that the sopho- 
mores can put on their best attire and 
stroll to the presidential residence. 

March 13 is an invitation for the 
frosh to learn the fundamentals of tea 
drinking and sandwich nibbling. 

These parties are all held on Wed- 
nesday afternoons, and the hour is 
from 3:00 to 5:30. 

With the previous knowledge of 
these delightful afternoons, the host 
and hostess may be assured of a large 
turnout from all the classes. 



PAGE TWO 



LA VIE COLLEGIENNE, THURSDAY, FEBRUARY 14, 1935 



Reinbold Elected 

The Clionian Literary Society has 
chosen as its second semester presi- 
dent Miss Emma Reinbold. Who is 
more worthy to hold the office than 
this genial, loveable senior, and it is 
with surety that a pleasant, profitable 
term may be anticipated. 

As her supporters the society has 
elected Jane Shellenberger vice-presi- 
dent, Irma Keiffer, recording secre- 
tary, Lois Harbold corresponding sec- 
retary, Maxine Earley treasurer, Ruth 
Buck pianist, and editor of the Olive 
Branch, Miriam Eichner. 



la Vit (Lollegtenne 

ESTABLISHED 1925 



A weekly publication by the Under- 
graduate Students of Lebanon 
Valley College 



EDITORIAL STAFF 

Helen Earnest, '35. ....Editor-in-Chief 

George Hiltner, '35 Associate Editor 

Richard Baus, '37 Managing Editor 

David Yake, '36.... Asst. Man. Editor 



RE PORTO RIAL STAFF 

Catherine Wagner, '35 
Sylvia Evelev, '36 
Louise Gillan, '36 
Lester Krone, '36 
Marian Leisey, 36 
Maxine Earley, '37 

Grace Naugle, '37.. General Reporters 

Ida K. Hall, '35„ Conservatory 

William Earnest, '37 Athletics 

Miriam Eichner. '37 _ Alumni 

Louis Straub, '37. _„..Philokosmian 

Charles Hauck, '35 Kalozetean 

Jane Shellenberger, 36 .....Clionian 

Marietta Ossi, '35- Delphian 



BUSINESS STAFF 

Kenneth Sheaffer, '35_....Business Manager 
Albert Anderson, '36...Asst. Bus. Manager 

Robert Cassel, '36 Circulation Manager 

Elwood Needy, '37 Asst. Cir. Manager 



Single Copies. — 5 cents 

Subscription.- - $100 per year 



Entered at the Annville, Pa., post 
office as second class matter, under the 
Act of March 3, 1879. 



THURSDAY, FEB. 14, 1935 



LINCOLN, THEN AND NOW 



In racking my brain for editorial food 
for thought a chance statement happened 
to come to my attention "We wonder 
what 'Honest Abe' would think of the 
world if he were alive today?" For a 
short period of time let us place Abra- 
ham Lincoln in our midst— in the thick 
of present day life as we lead it. 

James Truslow Adams informs us that 
the principal books the young genius had 
were the Bible, Shakespeare, and Black- 
stone. We can gaze at our own desks 
and extensive libraries to see the multi- 
tude of volumes— numerous texts and our 
own favorite books — at our disposal. 
What privileges a young mind has in 
the present day world— an unlimited sup- 
ply of book knowledge. Lincoln as a 
young, gawky lad read by firelight, his 
lanky body sprawled on the log cabin 
floor. Today we could give this lover 
of books not only a large choice of 
reading matter, but an easy chair, a foot- 
stool, and a reading lamp. 

This in a hasty glance shows us how 
the home life of this great man could 
have been much more comfortable and 
profitable, thanks to the radio, the tele- 
phone, and the hundred and one luxuries 
common to us today, but for instance 
what would Lincoln think of the present 
crime conditions were he to be handed a 
newspaper and told to feast his eyes and 
senses upon the gory details of some 
ghastly murder, or what would be his 
feelings were he to learn of the large 
number of horrible suicides and acci- 
dents? What would be his reaction if, 
in the capacity of judge, he were to ap- 
pear at the Hauptmann trial to pass 
sentence on this stoical German resident? 

Would this outstanding American, our 
beloved Abraham Lincoln, living in our 
midst today be able to solve these diffi- 
cult crime problems as he so ably handled 
the social injustice meted out to the 
slaves in his own day? 



FRESHMEN OFFICERS 



The freshman class met last Thurs- 
day, February 7, to elect officers for 
the new semester. They are: 

President, John Tindall; vice-presi- 
i dent, Martha Baney; secretary, Haz- 
el Heminway; treasurer, John Gong- 
loff. 



READERS' CLUB 

DISCUSSES MAGAZINES 

(Continued from Page One) 

cerning sports, etiquette, music, art, and 
theater. The usual editorial page col- 
umns deal with political and news com- 
ments, general news and views, humor, 
gossip, and philosophy. 

Mr. Fetter discussed a number of the 
most popular columnists, O. O. Mcln- 
tyre, Walter Lippmann, H. I. Phillips, 
Dorothy Dix, and Heywood Broun. The 
group present gave their views on col- 
umns and columnists. O. O. Mclntyre 
seemed to be the most popular. Arthur 
Brisbane ran Mclntyre a close second. 

Maxine Earley reviewed a number of 
the current magazines in a very charm- 
ing manner. Her report was very in- 
teresting and neatly presented. The first 
magazine she discussed was the "New 
Outlook," a monthly issue. This maga- 
zine is edited by Francis Walton., The 
magazine contains one or two big ar- 
ticles on the world's most pressing ques- 
tions. There are also articles on foreign 
affairs, economic problems, current 
events, correspondence, and book re- 
views. 

The "Review of Reviews," another 
monthly magazine, is edited by Albert 
Shaw. This publication gives different 
analyses of all public questions. Miss 
Earley also reviewed the "North Ameri- 
can Review," "The American Review," 
and "The Living Age." 

Lena Risser discussed the contents of 
a number of current periodicals. Miss 
Risser gave Mary Jane Shellenberger's 
report. The first magazine to be dis- 
cussed was the "New Yale Review," 
which is published quarterly by the Yale 
University Press. The editor is Wilbur 
Cross who is a member of the Yale Uni- 
versity faculty. The managing editor is 
Helen MacAfee. The magazine consists 
of a number of book reviews, a feature 
article, and current events. 

The Fortnightly which is published 
monthly in London was also reviewed by 
Miss Risser. The book comprises several 
stories, verses, and articles from differ- 
ent foreign countries. There is a section 
called Ebb and Flow which is a monthly 
commentary on world problems. 

The Virginia Quarterly Review and 
Current History were the last two peri- 
odicals discussed by Miss Risser. She 
pointed out the various sections and the 
contents of each magazine. The report 
as a whole was very well done. 

Adam Bigler gave a very inclusive 
discussion on literary magazines. He 
handled the group of magazines classi- 
fied as the "Big Four"— the Atlantic 
Monthly, Century, Harper's, and Scrib- 
ner's. The reviewer included in his talk 
a short sketch of the editors of these 
books. 

"Ted" Loose gave Louise Gillan's re- 
port. Miss Gillan could not be present 
because of illness. The magazines re- 
viewed in this group dealt with poetry. 
The Poetry magazine edited by Harriet 
Monroe was the first to be discussed. 
The little book gives us a perfect idea 
of the poetic production of the United 
States. There are a number of poetry 
reviews and news notes on poets. Since 



1912 it has been endowed by over 100 
persons. 

Poet Lore was also discussed. It is 
devoted to world literature and drama, 
not necessarily contemporary. The 
Stage, a national publication which aims 
impartially to record significant and in- 
teresting events in the field of theater 
and its cognate arts— movies, music, ra- 
dio, and the dance here and abroad, was 
reviewed. The last in this group to be 
considered was Theater Arts Monthly 
which includes excellent reproductions 
of manuscripts and painting relating to 
the theater. 

This was the last meeting planned for 
the semester. Suggestions for discussion 
for meetings for the spring were given 
and the meeting adjourned. 



L. V. BEATS BEARS; 

MUHLENBERG WINS 

(Continued from Page One) 



never headed, the final score reading 37 
for Muhlenberg and 29 for Lebanon Val- 
ley. 

Legs Leibensperger, six-foot, six-inch 
Muhlenberg center, and Joe Rodgers, 
flashy guard, contributed 23 points to 
the Mule offensive attack, while Pat Pa- 
trizio led the Valleyites with nine coun- 
ters. Muhlenberg's high-scoring for- 
wards, Cuchran and Lepore, were held 
to one field goal apiece, but the Blue and 
White failure to check Rodgers and the 
lanky top-off man spelled defeat for L. 
V. C. 



LEBANON 


VALLEY 








G. 


F. 


P. 


Barthold, f 


2 


3 


7 


Rust, f 


5 





10 


Billett, c 


1 





2 


Sponaugle, c 











Smith, g 


2 


7 


11 


Patrizio, g 


5 


1 


11 


Totals 


15 


11. 


41 


URSINUS 








G. 


F. 


P. 


Heiges, f 


3 


1 


7 


Calvert, f 


3 


4 


10 


Lauer, f 


1 


2 


4 


Johnson, c 





4 


4 


Costello, g 


3 


4 


10 


Twazydlo, g 











Greenawalt, g 


1 





2 


Totals 


11 


15 


37 


LEBANON 


VALLEY 








G. 


F. 


P. 


Barthold, f 


2 


1 


5 


Rust, f 


2 


2 


6 


Billett, c 


2 


3 


7 


Sponaugle, c 





1 


1 


Smith, g 





1 


1 


Patrizio, g 


2 


5 


9 


Snell, g 








.0 


Totals 


8 


13 


29 


MUHLENBURG 








G. 


F. 


P. 


Cuchran, f 


1 





2 


Lepore, f 


1 


1 


3 


Santipouli, f 


1 


1 


3 


Grossman, f 


2 


1 


5 


Leibensperger, c 


5 


1 


11 


Rodgers, g 


5 


2 


12 


Skrovanek, g 





1 


1 


Totals 


15 


7 


37 



Campus Cuts 



There have been a great many "long 
pans" on the campus since two very 
long, very closely typed sheets have been 
posted on the bulletin board. It reminds 
one of about two weeks ago when there 
were almost as many forlorn counte- 
nances because of a similar typewritten 
sheet which was posted. There's the rub! 
You lie awake nights trying to figure out 
where the money will come from to pay 
for the overcut to take the exam, then 
you lose more sleep cramming, spend 
three good hours in a classroom racking 
your poor befuddled brain and scratching 
out words that just don't sound right, 
and then, the list is posted before "the 
eyes of the world" and what do you 
have? Just another "E". That means 
another exam, and where are you? Back 
where you started, only there's the fee 
for the re-exam to ,worry about! 

Heart Sister Week is on, and any sort 
of surprise— from making beds and clean- 
ing rooms to giving presents of candy, 
magazines, flowers, etc.— is being pulled. 
It's fun to get the things, but it's more 
fun to keep all the secrets and plan the 
gifts. Cheer up, fellows, your chance to 
pull the "Heart Sister" act comes on the 
fourteenth. Don't forget! 



BELIEVE IT OR NOT 
A certain dormitory damsel was pre- 
paring a history paper for Professor Ste- 
venson. She consulted an English major 
about it, explaining that she wished to 
make a good impression. "I want to say 
that feudalism died out," she said. "Now 
don't you spell it d-y-e-d?" 



At the table last week during an ani- 
mated discussion, someone remarked that 
a certain person was quite naive. Ruth 
Buck stopped eating long enough to very 
nonchalantly remark that she thought 
Adam was naive. Shakespeare didn't 
realize what he was starting! 



Duke university 

SCHOOL OF MEDICINE 

DURHAM, 1ST. C. 

Pour terms of eleven weeks are given 
each year. These may be taken con- 
secutively (graduation in three years) 
or three terms may be taken each yea' - 
(graduation in four years). The en- 
trance requirements are intelligence, 
character and at least two vears o' 
college work, including the "subjects 
specified for Grade A Medical Schools- 
Catalogues and application forms ma)' 
be obtained from the Dean. 



SAINT JOHNSBURY ACADEMY 

Saint Johnsbury, Vermont 

An Old New England Academy in an Old New England Town. Thorough 
preparation for college. Commercial courses. Dormitories for boys and girls. 
X^'OP $ 550 covers all expenses. Scholarship aid for worthy boys and girls. 
WRITE PRINCIPAL STANLEY R. OLDHAM. L. V C. 08 



LA VIE COLLEGIENNE, THURSDAY, FEBRUARY 14, 1935 



PAGE THREE 



SPORT SHOTS 



Muhlenberg now rests at the top of 
the heap in the Eastern Pennsylvania 
Collegiate League by virtue of a 32-30 
victory over the fast-traveling Gettys- 
burg Bullets. 



Last night three league games were 
pi lyed. The Flying Dutchmen engaged 
the Albright Lions, Gettysburg battled 
F. & M., and Muhlenberg met Ursinus. 



Ursinus had to play three extra periods 
to decide two games last week. Drexel 
defeated the Bears 30-29 after two 
periods, and Franklin and Marshall eked 
out a 50-46 win over the Collegeville 
boys after one extra period. 



The Albright Lions who opposed the 
Blue and White last night have seeming- 
ly found themselves. They registered 
their first victory in six games against 
the Garnet quintet of Swarthmore by a 
decisive 45-38 score. The defeat was the 
first suffered by Swarthmore on its home 
•floor this season. Shipe, Ross, and 
Woods were the big guns in the Albright 
attack with 13, 12, and 12 points respec- 
tively. The remaining eight points were 
scored by Becker and Riffle. From all 
advance notices the game last night 
should have been a close and exciting 
struggle. 



The inter-class basketball season is 
here again. The Seniors and Frosh 
opened hostilities on Monday, and last 
night the Juniors and Sophs were sched- 
uled to battle it out. The remaining 
games have been set as follows: 

Monday, February 18— Seniors vs. 
Juniors. 

Thursday, February 21— Sophs vs. 
Frosh. 

Monday, February 25— Juniors vs. 
Frosh. 

Wednesday, February 27— Seniors vs. 
Sophs. 

Another game has been added to the 
1935 Blue and White football schedule 
since the La Vie first announced the 



Opening Game Of 

Inter-Class Teams 

SENIORS G. F. P. 

Arndt, f 2 4 

Ax, f 2 4 

P. Kanoff. f 3 1 7 

Sincavage, c 1 1 3 

Baugher, g 2 4 

Shroyer, g 113 

M. Kanoff, g 1 2 

Totals 12 3 27 

FROSH G. F. P. 

Gasterger, f 1 1 

Long, f 6 4 16 

Keiper, f 1 1 

Fry, c 

Ulrich, c 

Davies, g 1 1 

Capka, g 2 4 

Totals 8 7 23 

Seniors 9 7 6 5—27 

Frosh 1 9 8 5-23 



schedule some time ago. The Flying 
Dutchmen have accepted an invitation to 
help the Kutztown State Teachers dedi- 
cate a new stadium on September 28, 
1935. This game gives the Blue and 
White eleven a nine-game list for the 
coming season. 



CONFERENCE MEETS 

ON COLLEGE CAMPUS 



(Continued from Page One) 



Dr. Stevenson, coach, and "Hib" Nye, 
manager, have announced a schedule 
calling for ten intercollegiate tennis 
matches during the 1935 season. Here it 
is: 

April 29— Elizabethtown College at L. 
V. C. 

May 1 — Dickinson College at Carlisle. 
May 4— Alumni at L. V. C. 
May 6— St. Joseph's College at Phila- 
delphia. 

May 8— Juniata College at L. V. C. 
May 11— Bucknell University at Lewis- 
burg. 

May 15— Moravian College at Bethle- 
hem. 

May 18— Ursinus College at College- 
ville. 

May 25— Muhlenberg College at L. V. 
C. 

May 30- Albright College at L. V. C. 



conferences to consider, "The Work of 
the General Board," "The Work of the 
Conference Board," and the "Work of 
the Local Board." There was also a 
panel discussion on the "Evangelistic 
and Educational Approach in the Local 
Church." 

Rev. R. R. Butterwick, D. D., Profes- 
sor of Philosophy and Bible at Lebanon 
Valley College, spoke on "Creating 
an Educational Consciousness in Our 
Churches" at the Wednesday session. 
President Lynch spoke on "The Need 
for the Christian College in Modern 
Life." Other speakers of the day were: 
Rev. M. R. Fleming, Ph.D., of Red Lion, 
Pa.; Miss Mary McLanachan, Denomi- 
national Director of Children's Work; 
Rev. Martin I. Webber, M. A., Director 
of Adult Work and Leadership Training; 
Rev. John R. Ness. D. D., Superintend- 
ent of the Pennsylvania Conference; Rev. 
P. B. Gibble, D. D., of Palmyra, Pa. The 
conference periods considered "Under- 
girding Our Work Financially," "Our 
Responsibility to Children," "Leadership 
Training" and "Supporting Our Denom- 
inational Program." After the closing 
challenge by Rev. W. A. Wilt, D. D., 
pastor of the college church, the confer- 
ence adjourned. 

The college chapel on bcth confer- 
ence davs w ,s pleased to greet and be 
greeted by conference dee gates. Dr. 
Decver .spokt on bor'j days and intro- 
duced his colleagues. Dr. Martin I. Web- 
ber had charge of the de.ot'ons in the 
Tuesday chaps-' period. The next day 
Bi .hop Batdcrf spoke to the student body. 
Miss Mary McLanachan had charge of 
the devotion*. Miss McLanachan is an 
alumna of Lebanon Valley College. 

The conference was very well attend- 
ed despite the unfavorable weather con- 
ditions. The programs were most inter- 
esting, and a great deal was accom- 
plished. Lebanon Valley College has 
been very glad to welcome these educa- 
tional leaders of the church to her 
campus. 



President's Calendar 



Friday, Feb. 15— Guest at Founder's 
Day and mid-year commencement, 
Temple University, Philadelphia. 
Sunday, Feb. 17— Morning, deliver 
address in Columbia U. B. Church, 
Columbia; afternoon, speaker in Her- 
shey Community service, Hershey. 
Tuesday, Feb. 19— Guest of Dayton 
L. V. Alumnae Association, Day- 
ton, Ohio. 

Thursday, Feb. 21 — Speaker in 
Reamstown Vocational High 
School, Reamstown. 



Hiltner Leads Philo 

The Philokosmian Literary Society 
held a business session Friday at 1:00 
o'clock and elected the officers for the 
present semester. George Hiltner, a 
prominent Philo of outstanding ability, 
was chosen president. The other officers 
elected were as follows: 

Steffy, vice-president; Glen, treasurer; 
Lloyd, chairman of the executive com- 
mittee; Straub, secretary; Harnish, pian- 
ist; Metzger, chaplain; Schack, Ehrhart, 
and Dellinger, sergeants-at-arms. 

Kenneth Sheaffer, a popular senior 
who has just completed his duties as 
Philokosmian treasurer, was unanimous- 
ly elected anniversary president. 



MORAVIAN CO-EDS 

DOWN LEBANON VALLEY 



(Continued from Page One) 



second half with more dash and pep than 
before. 

Bouquets go to Harkins, Smith, Orth, 
and Jagnesak and due praise to the rest 
of the team. The game ended with the 
score 31-17 in favor of Moravian. 

The line-up was as follows: 

LEBANON VALLEY MORAVIAN 

Smith R. Forward Pock 

G. Harkins L. Forward Heinckle 

A. Orth Center Beaver 

J. Holsinger Side Center Yous 

I. Weirick R. Guard Fabian 

E. Binkley L. Guard Iobst 



PUBLIC SPEAKING 



(THE GETTYSBURG ADDRESS. 
s MR. VAN) PIPPLE - DELIVERED 
, \IN YOUR MOST PLE A5IN6 
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— AND THAT GOVERNMENT OF THE P EOP'Xl 
~\8Y THE PEOPLE, FOR THE PEOPLE JbJV^ — 
V 3^\SHALL NOT PERISH r~^Dr ■ 



THE EARTH 





Copyright, 1935, R. J. Reynolds Tobacco Company, Winston-Salem. N. C. 



SPEAKING OF YOBACICQ 



THE 5M0KIN6 TOBACCO THAT/ 
15 ENJOYED BY EVERYBODY 
BECAUSE OF IT5 MILDNESS 
AND MELLOWNESS IS 

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JOIN THE PRINCE ALBERT PARADE 



V &°\ti kVW^J kSJhs /favor oF It^ or (711^4^~ 






THE NATIONAL JOY SMOKE 




PAGE FOUR 



LA VIE COLLEGIENNE, THURSDAY, FEBRUARY 14, 1935 




FOR BREAKFAST 
For That In-Between Drink 
For Your Evening Bite 

. . . meet at . . . 



THE PENNWAY 



LANUX INTERESTS 

GROUP WITH SPEECH 



(Continued from Page One) 



friendships outside of college. There are 
no large organizations like the L R. C. 
of America which seems to have a level 
of opinion, but the whole of French life 
is permeated with individualism that 
causes great diversity even among the 
League of Nations groups (the nearest 
thing in France to the I. R. C). Conse- 
quently there is no nationwide move- 
ment toward the application of the dis- 
covered principles. 

Monsieur Lanux then applied this idea 
to the political scheme and showed that 
the parties are a sort of rainbow system 
of opinions rather than distinct parties. 
Really, it is a kind of two-party system 
of Left and Right. In the past 25 years 
the Right has stood for Conservatism and 
Nationalism with the Left taking the op- 
posite view; but they are not necessarily 
linked in this way. Often the paradox 
has existed wherein the Conservatives 
have been more liberal than the Liberals. 
Similarly the Radical Party, which began 
50 years ago as extremist, is now a 
moderate-center group. These strange 
facts are the result of the slow fluctuation 
of French individualism as compared 
with the landslides of opinion in other 
countries. 

Referring to our constitution the speak- 
er very nicely said "You know your 
Constitution has not charged much in 
the last hundred years. All you did was 
to give the negroes a right to vote which 
they do not take; keep people from drink- 
ing, which they do anyhow; and give 
women power, which they already had." 

In the evening, the witty Frenchman 
gave a full-dressed speech on the subject 
"The Race Between War and Peace" to 
a very appreciative audience. Although 
he protested that he could say nothing 
new on the subject, he demonstrated very 
clearly that people want peace, but arm 
in fear that their fellowmen across the 
border do not want peace. When the 
School of Peace was started in Paris two 
French newspapers immediately declared 
that it was good but that the Germans 
need it rather than the French; so is it 
everywhere. He further pointed out that 
if all the peacemakers would get togeth- 
er, since 95 per cent of the world wants 
peace, they could have it; yet there are 
great advances already made. 

Nations are seeing that war does not 
pay and are turning to peace even as 
Hitler changed from his aggressive pol- 
icy. The sad difficulty is that peace 
movements do not secure the publicity 
that war clouds do get. When armies 
are mobilized it is front page news, but 
when troops are withdrawn, often it is 
not even mentioned in many papers. But 
because of the greatness of the ideal 
leaders shall work on toward universal 
peace. 

In discussion Monsieur Lanux paid 
tribute to the Saar commission and con- 
sidered the settlement of that problem as 
both an advance to the cause of peace 



and a tribute to the League of Nations. 

The conference was concluded by a 
question on war debts. The usual system 
was reversed when the learned French- 
man advocated a brilliant plan of debt 
payment which would allow importers 
of French goods to pay the U. S. gov- 
ernment, while the exporters in France 
be paid by their nation. This would 
make possible the payment without gold 
or increased trade difficulties. This plan 
was opposed by an American who fa- 
vored cancellation. 

It was no wonder the group enjoyed 
this discussion and the closing statement 
of the speaker, that, not knowing much^. 
his chances were one of two that he was 
wrong, since he is either right or wrong; 
but an economist has nine chances out 
of ten of being wrong. 



DANCE FEATURES 

JOINT SESSION 



(Continued from Page One) 



fulness." 

Finally the well-received violin trio, 
Messrs. Hatz, Schuler, and Sausser, with 
Anderson as accompanist played popular 
songs. The supper hour was announced, 
and while waiting to be served Koch and 
Anderson entertained again. After re- 
freshing food and drink the guests were 
invited to the attractively decorated 
alumni gymnasium where Art Feeser's 
orchestra provided the music for dancing. 

Dr. and Mrs. Stonecipher, Professor 
and Mrs. Rutledge, and Mrs. Green were 
guests of the societies. 

The evening was planned by the co- 
operation of these committees: the pro- 
gram, Grace Naugle, Lois Harbold, Ger- 
ald Russell, Albert Anderson and Ernest 
Koch; the decoration, Dewey Linger, 
Clarence Aungst, and David Byerly; and 
the refreshment, William Kirkpatrick, 
John Brosius, and Henry Karcher. 



Goodman Brothers 

vv^w 

SODA FOUNTAIN 



Glee Club Promises 

Successful Season 



The Glee Club, under the direction of 
Professor Rutledge, will open its concert 
season this coming week, with two en- 
gagements—one in Cornwall on Thurs- 
day evening, and the other at the United 
States Veterans' Hospital in Coatesville 
on Friday evening. Other concerts are 
being arranged. 

Last year the Glee Club had an un- 
usually successful season, and after "lis- 
tening in" on a rehearsal one can be sure 
that the L. V. C. Glee Club is headed 
for repeated success this season. 



Riviera Restaurant 

Oysters and Crab Cakes 
Breyer's Ice Cream 



TOILET ARTICLES 

PATENT MEDICINES 
CIGARS - CIGARETTES 

ANDREW'S 
CUT RATE STORE 

OPPOSITE COURT HOUSE 

8th & cumberland sts. 

Lebanon, Pa. 
VISIT OUR FOUNTAIN 



Delphian Birthday 



Saturday, February 16, 1935, will 
mark the thirteenth anniversary of Del- 
phian Literary Society. A formal dance 
will be held at the Hershey Inn. The 
music will be furnished by Lloyd and 
Lloyd's orchestra. The orchestra is a 
very popular one in this vicinity and has 
often played at the Lebanon Country 
Club. 

The committees have been at work for 
several weeks and everything is in pre- 
paration. The hostesses will be Mrs. 
Green, Miss Meyers, Mrs. Derickson, 
and Mrs. Lynch. All the members of the 
faculty have been invited and many of 
them expect to be there. Letters have 
been received from alumnae who expect 
to be here on" Saturday. 



The Logical Place for L. V. C. 
Students to Buy 

BOOKS & SUPPLIES 
ESBENSHADE'S 

38 N. 8th St., Lebanon, Pa. 




KREAMER BROS. 



Leonard Elec. Refrigerators 
Hoover Electric Sweepers 
Easy Electric Washers 
Gas and Coal Stoves 
Rugs and Linoleums 



Furniture - - Undertaking 



Phone 14 4 ANNVILLE, PA. 



Books That Every 
Student Should Have 
In His Library 



Hartrampf's Vocabularies 
Synonyms — Antonyms— 

Relatives $1.00 

Roget's Thesaurus 1.00 

Outline of Man's Knowledge 1.00 
Crabbe's English Synonyms 1.00 

Useful Quotations 1.00 

Bartlett's Familiar Quotations 1.49 
The Modern Word Finder.! 1.00 



BOLLMAN'S 

628 CUMBERLAND STREET 
LEBANON. PA. 



CENTRAL 
Shoe Repair Shop 

A Trial Will Convince You! 
FRANK DI NUNZIO, Prop. 



FOR QUALITY 

Baked Products 

PATRONIZE 

FINK'S BAKERY 

MAIN STREET 



D. L. Saylor & Son* 
CONTRACTORS 

LUMBER and COAL 
Annville, Pennsylvania 



20% Discount Sale 

Continuing Throughout Feb. 
Let us help you to Economize 
John Hirsh Dep't Store 



Try ROEMIG'S 

25*5 LUNCH 

DELICIOUS SUNDAES 
With That Good Home-Made 
ICE CREAM 



CLOTHING OF QUALITY 

J. S. BASHORE 




LEBANON 9/5 



f?£AD/NG 7355 

moP^t 



PRINTING ^BINDING CO 



WE BEAT TNE WORLD ON RUSfl ORDERS 
MAKE US PROVE /T 

LEBANON 740 WALTON 520 WASHINGTON READING 



Finally 
They 
"Croaked" 




More 
Heap Big 
Wins 



LEBANON VALLEY COLLEGE 



VOL. XI 



ANNVILLE, PENNSYLVANIA, THURSDAY, FEBRUARY 21, 1935 



No. 19 



Wig and Buckle Club 
Presents The Frogs' 

MISS GILL AN DIRECTOR 



Cast Consists Mainly of Club 
Members — Novel Scenery 
And Costumes 



After several weeks of delay, Aristo- 
phanes' Greek play, "The Frogs," was 
finally presented on Monday, February 
18, in the Engle Conservatory, under 
the direction of Louise Gillan and as a 
project of the Wig and Buckle Club. 

As is typical of the majority of Aristo- 
phanes' plays, a small unavowed strug- 
gle for ascendency was represented, ac- 
companied alternately by triumphs and 
defeats. Likewise the play illustrated the 
author's pride in showing how a new- 
comer, whether at the palace of Hercules 
or Pluto, is kept at arm's length and is 
obliged to bow to the superior knowl- 
edge and importance of the established 
resident. 

Considering that the entire cast, with 
the exception of Lloyd Beamesderfer 
who is a general member, was composed 
of cub members of the organization, the 
play was well handled. It was evident 
that there is some excellent material that 
can be well used in any later productions 
of the club. In fact, almost the entire 
cast showed signs of having had some 
experience along the line of dramatics. 

As for floral tokens, several of those 
must be given. Excluding the cast, first 
of all a few words of commendation must 
be given to Carl Long and Fred Saylor, 
property men, who with cleverness and 
originality constructed some very unique 
scenery. Believe it or not, the boat used 
in the second scene was a work of art 
and quite unusual, having concealed roll- 
ers by which it could be propelled across 
the stage. Likewise in that scene came 
the appearance of actual bull-rushes and 
the cat-o-nine-tails, adroitly arranged to 
look natural. So, thanks, boys, and some 
day you are going to make a name for 
yourselves. 

To Lena Cockshott, Ida Hall, and 
Grace Naugle the credit is due for the 
costumes, real credit in fact, for they 
actually looked Greek. Casting all jokes 
aside, the costumes were very conducive 
to the success of the play, contributing 
hoth color and appropriate atmosphere. 

Nor must it be forgotten that the make- 
U P committee under the direction of Har- 
( Continued on Page 2, Column 3) 



STUDENT RECITAL 



Tuesday evening brings forth an- 
other one of our popular student re- 
citals. Ruth Bailey, our well-known 
pianiste, will play a Bach Partite— in 
C minor. Two new recitalists will be 
introduced on this program— Edna 
Binkley, pianiste, and Beatrice Fink, 
soprano. Others appearing in this re- 
cital are: Rae Anna Reber, cornet- 
iste; Frances Shearer, pianiste; Vir- 
ginia Summers, organ; Helen Butter- 
wick and Robert Sausser, violinists. 



Albright Yearlings 
Trounce L. V. Frosh 



CRIMSON SCORES 47 TO 26 



Valleyites Also Lose To Olt's 
City League Team ; 
Score 34 - 28 



The L. V. Frosh quintet suffered set- 
backs in each of their last two starts. 
The Blue and White yearlings were 
soundly trounced by the Albright Frosh 
last Wednesday night at Reading by a 
46-27 count. Saturday night in the pre- 
liminary to the Drexel-Lebanon Valley 
game the Frosh were subdued by Olt's 
team of the Lebanon City League, but 
only after a stiff battle. 

The Valley boys had nary a chance 
against the . Lion first-year quintet, but 
overcame an early lead held by the Olt's 
crew to make a real game of it. The 
Lebanon City Leaguers held a 17-15 ad- 
vantage at half-time, but the Frosh count- 
ed heavily in the third quarter to step 
ahead of their opponents, only to be 
headed in the closing minutes when Drum 
and Abrams got the range of the basket 
and counted three field goals apiece, the 
final count being 34-28 against the Frosh. 

Against Olt's, Kroske, Aungst, and 

(Continued on Page 3, Column 3) 



Y. W. C. A. ENTERTAINS 



The Y. W. C. A. Cabinet enter- 
tained the junior girls at tea in North 
^all parlor Wednesday, February 13, 
fr om 3:30 till 5:30. Rebecca Adams 
Wa s hostess and the frosh "Y" Cabi- 
net assisted in the serving. Other 
Quests were Mrs. Green, Mrs. Lynch, 
an d Miss Myers. There were cards, 
anagrams, and the new game, Kriss- 

ross. This week the sophomores 
^'H be entertained. 



Strubles Entertain 

Green Blotter Club 



The Green Blotter Club held its first 
meeting of this semester last Thursday 
night at the home of Dr. and Mrs. Stru- 
ble. In spite of the low attendance at the 
meeting, due to numerous other events 
which attracted many of the members, 
the evening was beneficially and enjoy- 
ably spent. 

Sylva Harclerode presented for the 
approval of the club a number of short 
poems which she had written. They 
wore thoroughly enjoyed and drew forth 
comment which was unanimously favor- 
able. 

The club president, Adam Bigler, read 
an essay entitled "A Retrospective View" 
in which he vividly portrayed the impres- 
"ion of college life as they have come to 
liini throughout two and a half years. 

George Hiltner, the oldest member 
in point of service, read a paper in which 
he proposed to show the need of a set 
standard by which the poetry of all time 

(Continued on Page 3, Column 4) 



Hiltner Makes Plans 
For First Senior Ball 



The senior class held a meeting Thurs- 
day in the Administration building. The 
president, George Hiltner, read the invi- 
tation to Mrs. Lynch's party on Wed- 
nesday. He appointed a committee to 
see that all the seniors turn out. The 
committee is comprised of Kotty Mc- 
Adam, Howard Lloyd, Rebecca Adams, 
and Galen Baugher. The date for the 
Senior Ball has not been definitely de 
cided upon. 

A motion was moved but not second- 
ed that there be a buffet supper with the 
dance. The supper, it is hoped, would be 
a recompense for those who do not dance 
but have paid their dues. No one who 
has not paid his dues in full will be able 
to enjoy the privilege of attending the 
dance. 

George Hiltner, the president, ap- 
pointed three committees for the ball. 
The orchestra committee, Howard Lloyd, 
chairman, Catherine Wagner, Rebecca 
Adams; place committee, Kotty Mc Ad- 
am, Charles Hauck, and Marietta Ossi; 
program committee, Edward Arndt and 
Philip Denton. With this business closed, 
the meeting was adjourned. 



Valley Basketeers 
Lose To Albright 
And Drexel Fives 



LIONS TRIUMPH 53 TO: 48 



Opening Debate 
Uses Oregon Plan 

VALLEYITES DOWNED 



Fetter And Bigler Make Up 
Home Affirmative Team 



Dragons Victorious, 43-42, As 
Kirkland Scores In Closing 
Seconds 



The subject for debate this year is— 
Resolved: That the nations should agree 
to prevent the international shipment of 
arms and munitions. 

The planned program of debates on 
this subject is: 

Feb. 19, Western Maryland, negative 
team travels, dual. 

March 4, Catawba College, affirmative 
team, single. 

March 12, Albright College, affirmative 
team travels, dual. 

March 20, University of Penna., affirm- 
ative team, single. 

March 21, Elizabethtown College, af- 
firmative team travels, dual. 

March 27, Michigan State College. 

April 27, Lincoln University, negative 
team travels, dual. 

The first debate of the season was 
he'd on Tuesday, February 19, with 
Western Maryland College. Prof. Richie 
as chairman introduced the speakers, who 
were: C. W. Fetter and A. Bigler, af- 
firmative, from L.V.C., and L. Simpson 
and L. Warman, negative, from Western 
Maryland. 

Constructive twelve minute speeches 
were delivered by Fetter and Simpson, 
and seven minute questionings by Bigler 
and Farman, with seven minute summar- 
ies by the latter two. The debate was 
most interesting to the unusually large 
(Continued on Page 3, Column 4) 



Despite flashes of brilliancy which 
showed the Blue and White five to pos- 
sess real scoring power, the varsity quin- 
tet suffered two defeats during the last 
week. 

A poor showing during the first half 
of the encounter with the Albright Lions 
spelled defeat for the Flying Dutchmen 
last Wednesday at Reading while an 
amazing rally by the Drexel basketeers 
in the last three minutes of play wiped 
out a Valley lead and enabled the Dra- 
gons to nose out the Blue and White, 
43-42, Saturday night on the Lebanon 
High court. 

Drexel got off to a good start against 
Lebanon Valley and led 4-1, then 7-4, 
as Curry, tall forward, slipped away for 
a brace of twin counters. The Blue and 
White outfit, led by "Stew" Barthold, 
drew up on the Philadelphians, finally 
tying the score at 11 -all. The Valley 
continued to keep up with the Dragons, 
and finally stepped into the lead at 22-20, 
with two minutes to go in the first half. 
Another Valley field goal gave them a 
24-20 lead at intermission, a lead which 
was swelled to 30-20, then 34-22, when 
the Flying Dutchmen, with Barthold and 
Rust doing most of the scoring, put on 
one of their best exhibitions of offensive 
power of the year at the start of the sec- 
ond half. 

However, the Drexelites fought back 
doggedly and cut Lebanon Valley's lead 
to 38-33 with seven minutes to go. Four 
more minutes of play saw the score 
change to 42-36, still favoring the Blue 
and White, but Donaldson, stellar Drex- 
el guard, suddenly came to life to regis- 
ter two field goals that brought the count 
to 42-40 with 50 seconds to go. 

Wallace made good on a foul shot for 
the visitors, but when L. V. C. recovered 
the ball after the following top-off, eve- 
rything seemed practically over. Then 
it happened! L. V. C. lost the ball out 
of bounds at their end of the court, the 
Drexelites took the ball down fast, Kirk- 
land, a substitute forward, received the 

(Continued on Page 3, Column 1) 



HEART SISTER TEA 



Heart Sisters disclosed their iden- 
tity to one another Sunday afternoon 
at the Heart Sister tea given by each 
of the three dorms. It was a very in- 
formal and intimate group of juit the 
girls and their deans who spent a so- 
ciable hour together talking over the 
things that had been done during the 
week. In North Hall, Alma Cline was 
hostess while Rebecca Adams and the 
freshman girls served. 



PAGE TWO 



LA VIE COLLEGIENNE, THURSDAY, FEBRUARY 21, 1935 



Ha Vit (Lollegtenne 

ESTABLISHED 1925 



A weekly publication by the Under 
graduate Students of Lebanon 
Valley College 



EDITORIAL STAFF 

Helen Earnest, '35__ Editor-in-Chief 

Ueorge Hiltner, '35 Associate Editor 

Hichard Baus, '37 Managing Editor 

David Yake, '36 _ Asst. Man. Editor 



REPORTORIAL STAFF 

Catherine Wagner, '35 
Sylvia Evelev, '36 
Louise Gillan, '36 
Lester Krone, '36 
Marian Leisey, 36 
Alaxlne Earley, '37 

Grace Naugle, '37 General Reporters 

Ida K. Hall, '35 - Conservatory 

William Earnest, '37- - Athletics 

Miriam Eichner. '37 Alumni 

Louis Straub, '37 Philokosmian 

Charles Hauck, 35 Kalozetean 

Jane Shellenberger, 36 Clionian 

Marietta Ossi, '35 ~ Delphian 

BUSINESS STAFF 

Kenneth Sheaffer, '35 Business Manager 

Albert Anderson, '36...Asst. Bus. Manager 

Robert Cassel, '36.. Circulation Manager 

Elwood Needy, '37 Asst. Cir. Manager 

Single Copies — - - 5 cents 

Subscription $1.00 per year 

Entered at the Annville, Pa., post 
office as second class matter, under the 
Act of March 3, 1879. 

THURSDAY, FEB. 21, 1935 



TO DO OR NOT TO DO 



After the presidential address in chapel 
the other morning, how many of us 
seriously considered a mental house clean- 
ing? How many have genuinely deter- 
mined to cease wasting time and to settle 
down to some honest work? 

When we stop to consider the amount 
of money spent on our college eduactions, 
either by our parents or our own efforts, 
does it not seem that we really should 
be getting some lasting results from our 
struggles? 

We, as seniors, what will we have to 
show for a four year apprenticeship at 
this institution? Just a mere slip of 
parchment, a written acknowledgement of 
our stay at L.V., or can we see any 
definite betterment in ourselves since 
those timid green frosh days in the fall 
of 1931? 

Outwardlyy most of us have gained a 
bit in dignity and poise, some fragments 
of knowledge must have clung to us thru 
the semesters, but inwardly have we ac- 
quired a taste for a more cultured and 
broader scope of life, or will we continue 
to look at the world with the same high 
school attitude with which we entered 
Lebanon Valley? 

These last few months are our final 
stabs at a fuller preparation for life, let 
us make these vital and forever lasting 
in our memories. Let us put ourselves 
into our work and extra-curicular activ- 
ities with zest and boundless enthusiasm, 
a desire to do better than ever before as 
a successful farewell to our never-to-be- 
forgotten Alma Mater. 



ALUMNI NOTES 



Ray J. Guyer, '08, former athletic 
coach of L. V. C, and now the director 
of physical education and athletics at 
the Connecticut Agricultural College, 
was elected president of the National 
Archery Association. Mr. Guyer has 
long been interested in archery, having 
organized a state association at Storrs, 
Conn. 



Literary Digest Peace Poll Results 



In a recent Peace Poll conducted by 
the Literary Digest, American university 
graduates voted a scant majority against 
the United States entering the League of 
Nations. Ballots were returned by more 
than one-third of those to whom they 
were sent — the highest percentage of re- 
turns ever obtained in a Digest poll. Of 
these 49.47 per cent favored the United 
States' entry into the League of Nations, 
while 50.53 per cent voted against it. 

Questioned as to whether the United 
States could stay out of another great 
war the student vote was more than 2 to 
1 in the affirmative. 

Asked "if the borders of the United 
States were invaded would you bear arms 
in defense of your country?" 83.54 per 
cent of the students voted that they 
would, while 16.46 per cent voted that 
they could not. 

On the question of bearing arms for 
the United States in the invasion of the 
borders of another country, 17.82 per 
cent voted affirmatively, and 82.18 per 
cent voted negatively. 



By an overwhelming majority of more 
than 9 to 1 the students showed their 
advocacy of government control of arm- 
ament and munitions industries. 

By a 69,715 to 41,407 vote, they voiced 
their opposition to a national policy that 
a "navy and air force second to none is 
a sound method of insuring us against 
being drawn into another great war." 

In most cases all of the colleges agreed 
on every question. All women's colleges, 
it is interesting to note, voted in favor 
of entry into the League, while all Cath- 
olic colleges on the list opposed entry. 
It is also interesting to compare returns 
from colleges in the same state on the 
League question. The University of Illi- 
nois opposed entry; the University of 
Chicago favored entry; Michigan State 
opposed American membership in the 
League. 

In summary of the results from the 118 
colleges in America, Dana College, in 
New Jersey, was the only one in which 
a majority believed that the United States 
could not stay out of another great war. 



Cornwall Concert 

Opens Club Season 

The first Glee Club concert of the sea- 
son was given at Cornwall on Thursday 
evening. The program was well-bal- 
anced, having both unity and variety. 
The program: 

Invocation of Orpheus Peri 

My Dream of Love (Liebestraum) 

Liszt-McLeod 

The Bubble Friml 

Glee Club 

Nocturne Curran 

White Horses of the Sea Warren 

Dale Roth, tenor 

Lost in the Night Christiansen 

Winter and Spring Borowski 

Beautiful Savior Christiansen 

Bethlehem Night Warrell 

Glee Club 

Sarabande Bohm 

Fairy Tale Komzak 

Intermezzo Pizzicato Neury 

Violin Quartet 
Martha Elser Russell Hatz 
Oleta Dietrick Margaret Paige 

Joshua Fit de Battle ob Jericho Gaul 

It's Me, O Lord Cain 

Shortnin' Bread Wolfe 

Glee Club 

Instrumental numbers Selected 

Spanish Easter Carol of the Lambs.-Gaul 

A-Hunting We Will Go Koutz 

The Bugle of Spring .Pitcher 

Glee Club 
Sara Light, Accompanist. 
Friday evening the Glee Club will give 
the same program in Coatesville at the 
Masonic Temple. 



NEW BOOK CLUB 

A faculty Readers' Club has been or- 
ganized on the campus, consisting main- 
ly of the wives of the faculty members. 
The club has no regular meeting, but 
the books are circulated around from 
one member to the other and discussed 
informally. The infant organization has 
been getting along very successfully, and 
all the members seem to enjoy the club 
immensely. Membership consists of: 
Mrs. Lynch, Mrs. Stevenson, Mrs. Wal- 
lace, Mrs. Bender, Miss Myers, Mrs. 
Rutledge, Mrs. Carmean, Mrs. Struble, 
Mrs. Bailey, Mrs. Shenk, Mrs. Richie, 
Mrs. Reynolds, and Mrs. Stonecipher. 



WIG AND BUCKLE CLUB 
PRESENTS "THE FROGS" 



(Continued from Page One) 



old Phillips made a contribution. This 
factor was also capably done. 

Now to the play. The scene opens be- 
fore the abode of Hercules (Elwood 
Needy) who filled the part in stature, 
power of voice, and actions. After Bac- 
chus (Lloyd Beamesderfer) and his serv- 
ant, Xanthias (Clyde Magee) had in- 
quired the direction to the shades below 
they set out to find a clever poet for the 



earthly regions. Their first acquaintance 
was Charon (Louis Straub), the ferry, 
man across the Styx. Having been safe- 
ly conducted over the river, they ap- 
peared before Pluto's palace from which 
came Aeacus (Kenneth Eastland), the 
keeper of the watch-dog, Cerberus, which 
they had seized and about which Aeacus 
now raised a tremendous vociferation. 
As he departs to find his officers to ar- 
rest these miscreants, they are saluted by 
Proserpine's servant maid (Martha 
Faust) who invites them to an elaborate 
feast. In the meantime, they are encoun- 
tered by two women (Sylva Harclerode 
and Carolyn Roberts) who kept boarding 
houses that were maliciously ravaged of 
victuals by these travelers. 

Bacchus and "Xanthias change attire, 
a situation which confuses Aeacus very 
much. His attempt to determine the true 
deity by means of the application of se- 
vere lashings fails to work so he takes 
them before Pluto (Benjamin Bollinger). 

In the meantime, Bacchus wins great 
favor, and the honor of selecting the best 
poet to take back is given to them. Euri- 
pides (Fred Saylor) and Aeschylus 
(Charles Kinney) both bring their poe- 
try to the steel yards where it is weighed 
and measured. Bacchus finally decides 
in favor of Aeschylus, and the play is 
finished. 

Other characters who appeared were 
Lloyd Berger who played the difficult role 
of the head man, the dancing chorus com- 
posed of Lena Risser, Lucile Maberry, 
Wanda Price, Louise Stoner, Isabel Cox, 
and Hazel Hemingway, and the flutist, 
Johns. 

Thus to Dr. Stonecipher for his kind 
assistance, to the cast for its willing co- 
operation and praiseworthy performance, 
and to all others who made the produc- 
tion possible are extended a hearty vote 
of thanks. 



SAINT JOHNSBURY ACADEMY 

Saint Johnsbury, Vermont 

An Old New England Academy in an Old New England Town. Thorough 
preparation for college. Commercial courses. Dormitories for boys and girls. 
Tuition $550 covers all expenses. Scholarship aid for worthy boys and girls. 
WRITE PRINCIPAL STANLEY R. OLDHAM. L. V. C. 08 



so much 
for so little! 

It costs very little to telephone 
out of town. At night, for ex- 
ample, you can call 100 miles 
for 35 cents*. What the call 
costs is a mere trifle compared 
to what it's worth! Hearine 
the voices and sharing the 
news of distant friends or 
home folks is next best to 
seeing them. 

* Station to Station call; 3- 
minute connection; after 
8:30 P. M. Standard Time. 

/ 



The Bell Telephone Company of Pennsylvania 




/ 



No. 18 



LA VIE COLLEGIENNE, THURSDAY, FEBRUARY 21, 1935 



PAGE THREE 



LEBANON VALLEY LOSES 
TO ALBRIGHT AND DREXEL 



(Continued from Page One) 



oval at mid-court, dribbled down the 
center of the floor and tried a freak one- 
handed shot from the foul line. The ball 
swished right through the cords, and be- 
fore another toss-up could be called, the 
game ended, with Drexel on the long end 
of a 43-42 score. 

The closing events of the game were 
so amazing that spectators were dazed 
and could not realize for a time that L. 
V. C. had lost the game. 

Captain Barthold showed real form to 
tally 23 points in 10 field goals and 3 
fouls. "Stew" was ably assisted by 
"Smoky" Rust, who registered 10 points. 
Curry and Donaldson were outstanding 
for Drexel, with Kirkland and the real 
hero, one of his two field goals being that 
amazing game-winning toss. 

The Albright Lions stepped fast during 
the first half against L. V. C. to lead 
27-13 at half time. The second session 
was an entirely different story, with the 
Blue and White outscoring their oppo- 
nents 35 to 26/ but the Crimson and 
White lead proved too much for the 
Valleyites to overcome, the final score 
showing L. V. C. to be trailing by five 
points at 53-48. Captain Bob Shipe of 
the Reading outfit was the outstanding 
player on the floor, counting 20 points. 
For the Blue and White Patrizio, Rust, 
and Billett were high scorers. 

Summaries: 



Informal Dance 



Clio provided amusement in the 
way of a gymnasium dance last Sat- 
urday night for those who were left 
on the campus after Delphians had 
departed and after the week-enders 
were eliminated. Lack of time made it 
impossible for the new program com- 
mittee to plan a floor show for the 
occasion. To the strains of popular 
music as played by a Lebanon or- 
chestra, the guests danced from eight 
to eleven-thirty o'clock, all for the 
price of one dime. Miss Kenyon and 
Miss Marshall acted as chaperones 
for the affair. Mrs. Green also at- 
tended the dance. 



ALBRIGHT YEARLINGS 

TROUNCE L. V. FROSH 



[Continued from Page One) 



LEBANON VALLEY 

G. 

Rust, f 4 

Barthold, f 10 

B. Sponaugle 

Billett, g-c 1 

Smith, g 

Patrizio, g-f 2 

Snell, g 

Totals 17 

DREXEL 

G. 

Curry, f-c 8 

Raynes, f i 



F. 
2 
3 

2 

1 




T. 
10 

23 

4 

5 




8 42 



F. 
1 





T 
17 

2 



Jankuskas, f 

Hoff, c 1 2 

Kirkland, c-f 2 4 

Donaldson, g 4 3 11 

Knapp, g 1 3 5 

Wallace, g 2 2 

Totals 17 9 43 

Referee— Julian, Bucknell. 

Drexel 20 23—43 

L. V. C 24 18-42 

LEBANON VALLEY 

G. F. T. 

Barthold, f 1 2 

Rust, f 6 1 13 

Kinney, f 1 1 

Snell, f 1 1 

Sponaugle, c 2 4 

Billett, g 5 3 13 

Patrizio, g 6 2 14 

Smith, g 

Totals 20 8 48 

ALBRIGHT 

G. F. T. 

Shipe, f 8 4 20 

Becker, f 4 8 

Ross, c 3 2 8 

Woods, g 4 1 9 

R. Riffle, g 4 8 

Totals 23 7 53 

Referee — Allen Boyer. 

Albright 27 26-53 

L. V. C 13 35-48 



Rozman were the most consistent Frosh 

scorers, while Tindall and Aungst led 

the futile L. V. attack on the Albright 
Frosh. The scores: 



ALBRIGHT FRESHMEN 

G. 

Slingiland, f 

Troisi, f 5 

Brogley, f 1 

Knox, c 5 

Oslislo, g 1 

Rudisill, g 2 

Shirk, g 2 

Treida, g 3 

Totals 19 

L. V. C. FRESHMEN 

G. 

Billett, f 1 

Tindall, f 5 

Aungst, c 1 

Klipa, g 

Rozman, g 1 

Shenk, g 

Totals 8 

OLT'S CITY LEAGUE 

G. 

Abrams, f 4 

Stahl, f 2 

Drum, f 4 

Aufentz, f-c 

Ohlinger, c 3 

Kiscadden, g 

Kreider, g 

Whitman, g 

Heverling, g 1 

Totals 14 

L. V. C. FRESHMEN 

G. 

Billett, f 

Shenk, f 

Tindall, f 

Kroske, f 3 

Aungst, c 1 

Rozman, g 4 

Klipa, g 2 

Totals 10 



F. 
1 
2 


• 1 



1 

3 



EASTERN PENNSYLVANIA 
COLLEGE LEAGUE 



8 46 



F. 
2 
3 
6 






11 27 



F. 


2 

2 


1 
1 




Wednesday, Feb. 13 
Albright 53, Lebanon Valley 48. 
Gettysburg 28, F. & M. 26. 
Muhlenberg 37, Ursinus 36. 

Friday, Feb. 15 
Drexel 43, Lebanon Valley 42. 

Saturday, Feb. 16 
Gettysburg 57, Drexel 14. 
Muhlenberg 51, Albright 26. 

Monday, Feb. 18 
F. & M. 47, Albright 35. 

Standing of the Teams 

W. L. Pet. 

Muhlenberg 8 1.000 

Gettysburg 6 1 .857 

F. and M 5 2 .714 

Drexel 4 6 .400 

Albright 1 5 .16? 

Ursinus 1 5 .167 

Lebanon Valley 1 7 .125 



STRUBLES ENTERTAIN 

GREEN BLOTTER CLUB 



(Continued from Page One) 



F. 
1 
1 
1 

4 
1 




2 
6 

1 
1 
2 

34 

T. 
1 
1 
1 
6 
6 
4 
4 



might be judged and evaluated. 

Louis Straub also read a number of his 
poems, including his "Retrospectus" in 
which he set out to outline briefly the 
events which attended his freshman year 
at Lebanon Valley College. Then, after 
the small group had enjoyed Mrs. Stru- 
ble's delightful refreshments, the meeting 
adjourned. 



OPENING DEBATE 

USES OREGON PLAN 



(Continued from Page One) 



8 28 



audience, as all the speakers showed 
their familiarity with the subject and 
freely indulged in relevant witticisms. 

The judges, Professor Downes, Mr. 
Leopold and Reverend Patterson, gave a 
decision in favor of the negative side, 
who were favored by long experience. 



ELECTRICAL ENGINEERING 



[in transfo rming alternating? to direct 

^ .CURRENT , THE MOTOR-GENERATOR 
CONSIST OF AN INDUCTION 

MOTOR DIRECT 
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<■ $9 




^i^cv.i - v,uiMpicv. icn i u Mrs 



IN CHANGING FROM ONE FREQUENCY TO 
ANOTHER., WE MUST USE A MOTOR-GENERATOR 
WHICH IS MADE UP OF A SYNCHRONOUS MOTOR 
DIRE CT- CONNECTE D TO AN ALTERNATING 

CURRENT GENERATOR 





Copyright. 1936. R J. Raynolda Tobteco Company. Wlnai 



SMOKER'S 

ADVANCED 



NOTEBOOK 

^^^^ 



prince Albert 



THE NATIONAL 
JOY SMOKE ! 



PAGE FOUR 



LA VIE COLLEGIENNE, THURSDAY, FEBRUARY 21, 1935 




FOR BREAKFAST 
For That In-Between Drink 
For Your Evening Bite 

. . . meet at . . . 



THE PENNWAY 



Prayer Meeting 

The mid-weekly prayer meetings, 
which were suspended during the ex- 
amination period because of their con- 
flict with studies, have been resumed 
as a regular part of the college pro- 
gram. The first meeting of the new 
semester was held last Wednesday 
night in Philo hall. Miller Schmuck, 
a ministerial student who was award- 
ed his annual conference license last 
fall, assumed charge of the service 
and delivered a short inspiring talk. 



SENIORS HEAD 

CLASS LEAGUE 



The Seniors are at present leading the 
pack in the Inter-class Basketball League. 
They registered their second victory 
Monday night at the expense of the Ju- 
niors by the score of 55-36, to lead the 
Sophomores, who registered a victory in 
their only start thus far. Arndt, Ax, 
Keiter, Donmoyer, Bachman, and Heisch 



have been the 


high scorers for 


their 


re- 


spective teams 


to date. 


Summaries: 






SENIORS 












G. 


F. 


T. 


Lloyd, f 




2 


1 


5 


Arndt, f 




10 





20 


M. Kanoff, f 




3 





6 


Baugher, c 




3 





6 


Sincavage, c 




1 


1 


3 


Boran, g 













Shroyer, g 




1 





2 


Ax, g 




5 


3 


13 


Totals 




25 


5 


55 




JUNIORS 












G. 


F. 


T. 


Edwards, f 




3 





6 


Rader, f 




2 


1 


5 


Spohn, f 













C. Sponaugle, 


c 


3 


1 


7 


Hershey, g 




2 


1 


5 


Huber, g 













Keiter, g 




6 


1 


13 


Totals 




16 


4 


36 




JUNIORS 












G. 


F. 


T. 


Harnish, f 




4 





8 


Keiter, f 




3 





6 


Kuhlman, f 













Spohn, c 




2 





4 


Hershey, g 




2 





4 


Huber, g 













Rader, g 




1 





2 


Totals 




12 





24 


SOPHOMORES 










G. 


F. 


T. 


Donmoyer, f 




6 


1 


13 


Holtzman, f 







1 


1 


Brosius, f 













Lazin, c 













Heisch, g-c 




5 





10 


Straub, g 













Zierdt, g 













Bachman, g 




5 


1 


11 


Totals 




16 


3 


35 



Campus Cuts 



Some familiar campus sayings heard 
in the last week: 

What did your heart-sister give you 
today? 

Move on. No parking here (see Fran 
Holtzman) . 

Are you going to Delphian? 

Did you girls raid a cemetery Sun- 
day morning? 

Can you believe it! They gave the 
Greek play tonight. 

What did your boy friend give you 
for Valentine? 

Socks are barred! 



There is the story of the North Hall 
girl who got a beautiful big box of 
candy on Valentine's Day, and then trUfed 
to give it back to him in one big and 
glorious gesture . . . Wonder what she 
would have done if he had taken it! 



Can you imagine!!!! Boyd Shaffer did- 
n't know what "spoonerism" means. 
However, he did confess to a knowledge 
of the first part of the word, so I guess 
we can forgive him. 



Louis Straub's question as to who the 
"visiting dignitary" in French 16 class 
would be has been answered. Henry 
Palatini taught the class! 



And there is the boy whose girl friend 
received a lovely gardenia from her 
heart-sister and who soberly questioned 
"Is that an orchid?" 



More heart-sister dope! Better watch 
your pictures, fellows. More than one 
has been put in the center of a lacy 
heart! 



We wonder who the little frosh day 
student was who said that her date for 
Delphian was like a bit of heaven? The 
male's initials might have been Hauck. 



A Letter I Might Write Home 
Dear Mother: 

I am very busy this week and can't 
send you but a few lines. There are so 



The Logical Place for L. V. C. 
Students to Buy 

BOOKS & SUPPLIES 
ESBENSHADE'S 

38 N. 8th St., Lebanon, Pa. 



TOILET ARTICLES 

PATENT MEDICINES 
CIGARS - CIGARETTES 

ANDREW'S 
CUT RATE STORE 

OPPOSITE COURT HOUSE 

8TH & CUMBERLAND 8T8. 

Lebanon. Pa. 
VISIT OUR FOUNTAIN 



many things one can do over week-ends. 
This Saturday night was Delphian dance 
but nobody asked me to go!! so that was 
eliminated. Clio also gave a dance in 
the gym but since someone else took my 
girl there wasn't much I could do about 
that. Besides, I couldn't have gone any- 
way since you forgot to send me my al- 
lowance last week and the admission 
was a dime per person. So there wasn't 
much that I could do but stay in and 
study. I am enclosing a picture of my- 
self that one of the fellows took while I 
was working at my desk (see Shroyer 
for proof). 

With all my love, 

Buddy. 



Frankie says there's only one girl who 
really cared for him, and that's the nurse 
he had when he was sick. 

"I'm goin' to keep on sendin' my boy 
to L. V. C," said Mr. Schwartz. 

"You think he has exceptional intelli- 
gence?" 

"No, confidentially I don't think Bill 
has a great deal of sense, but I'm goin' 
to put him in the way of learning a lot 
of long words so's maybe he can fool 
people. 

Burglar: "Don't be alarmed, lady, I 
shan't touch you. All I want is your 
money." 

Old Maid: "Oh. go away! You're 
just like all the other horrid men!" 



Freshman — Irresponsible. 
Sophomore — Irrepressible 
Junior — Irresistible. 
Senior— Irreproachable. 



There was once a co-ed, guite shy, 
Who said to a stu3ent named Cy: 
"If you kiss me of course 
You will have to use force, 
But thank heavens you're stronger 
than I." 




KREAMER BROS. 



Leonard Elec. Refrigerators 
Hoover Electric Sweepers 
Easy Electric Washers 
Gas and Coal Stoves 
Rugs and Linoleums 



Furniture - - Undertaking 



Phone 14 4 ANNVILLE, PA. 



Bargains in Fine Books 



Great Works of Art^And 
What Makes Them Great— 



by Ruckstull $1.89 

The Mansions of Philosophy — 

by Will Durant 1.43 

Modern Painting— by Mather .... 1.46 
Pageant of Civilization— by Bro- 

deur 1.46 

Romance of Archaeology — by 

Magoffin 1.59 

The Roget Thesaurus— Ed. by 

Mawson 1.39 

Story of Biology— by Locy 1.54 

Stories of Great Operas and 

Their Composers— by Ernest 

Newman 1.47 

Droll Stories— by Balzac 1.6^ 

The Decameron — Baccaccio 1.79 

Mv Life As An Explorer — by 

Sven Hediu 1.59 

Major Mysteries of Science — by 

Garbedian 1.39 

The Modern Encyclopedia- 
Latest Edition 1.95 

Dictionary vf Politics 2.50 



BOLLMAN'S 

628 CUMBERLAND ST. 
LEBANON. PA. 



FOR QUALITY 

Baked Products 

PATRONIZE 

FINK'S BAKERY 

MAIN STREET 



D. L. Say lor & Sons 
CONTRACTORS 

LUMBER and COAL 
Annville, Pennsylvania 



20% Discount Sale 

Continuing Throughout Feb. 
Let us help you to Economize 

John Hirsh Dep't Store 



For Recreation, Try 

ROEMIG'S 

BILLIARDS and BOWLING 



CLOTHING OF QUALITY 

J. S. BASHORE 



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MAKE US PROVE /T 

LEBANON 740 WALTON 520 WASHINGTON READING 



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HAIL, 
THE 
DEAN 



LEBANON VALLEY COLLEGE 



ATTEND 
THE 
TEAS 



VOL. XI 



ANNVILLE, PENNSYLVANIA, THURSDAY, FEBRUARY 28, 1935 



No. 20 



Men's Dormitory To 
Include New Home 
For the Carmean's 



1935 CATALOGUE REVEALS 



Reception Room, Methods Cour- 
ses, and Scholastic Stand- 
ards Examined 



The item of main interest in the col- 
lege catalogue for the new school year 
is the announcement that Mr. and Mrs. 
Carmean are going to occupy a suite of 
rooms in the men's dormitory, beginning 
September, 1935. Mrs. Carmean is a 
registered nurse, and will render emer- 
gency service whenever necessary. They 
will be in the dormitory not as spies or 
policemen, but as counselors and guides 
— to live with the students as custodians 
of the building. Another vital change 
will be noticed in the men's quarters in 
the reception room which is to be fur- 
nished on the first floor for the accom- 
modation of parents and other visitors. 
These two changed conditions should 
make the dormitory more conducive to 
study, and it should prove uplifting in 
the social side of dorm life. When finan- 
ces permit, it is the purpose of the col- 
lege to renovate the entire dormitory. 

In the future students holding competi- 
tive scholarships will be expected to 
maintain a high scholastic standard, for 
all other scholarships, including the min- 
isterial ones, the recipients will have to 
maintain an average of "C" in semester 
grades or be deprived of their financial 
aid. 

The candidates for degrees will now 
have to obtain a minimum of 130 quality 
points, computed as follows: for a grade 
of A, 3 points; for a grade of B, 2 points; 
for a grade of C, 1 point. No quality 
credit will be given for a grade of D. 
(Continued on Page 2, Column 2) 



Dayton Valley Alumni 
Hold Annual Meeting 

The alumni of Lebanon Valley College 
>n Dayton, Ohio, held a meeting on 
Tuesday, the 19th. There were forty 
alumni present. Messrs. Schell, Ranck, 
Goodman, and Zech, all recent graduates 
°f Lebanon Valley, were among this 
number. 

Bishop A. R. Clippinger was the toast- 
master, and presented the following 
speakers: Dr. John Lyter, '14, the assist- 
ant editor of Sunday School literature, 
s Poke on "The College Fifty Years 
Ago"; Dr. V. O. Weidler, '10, secretary 
°f Home Missions, spoke on "The Hu- 
morous Side"; Dr. W. G. Clippinger, '99, 
President of Otterbein College, gave an 
address, "Recent Trends of Liberal Arts 
college Movement"; Dr. Clyde A. Lynch 
s Poke to the group on the subject of the 
Resent Status of Lebanon Valley Col- 
le ge." 

The alumni group decided to hold an- 
nu al meetings. The following were elect- 
. (Continued on Page 4, Column 3) 



REBER SPEAKS AT 

PRAYER SESSION 



The second college prayer meeting 
of the second semester was held Wed- 
nesday night in Philo hall. The speak- 
er for the evening was Calvin Reber, 
a junior in this college, who is also a 
ministerial student. He spoke on"The 
Abundant Life" and presented a very 
fine, uplifting speech, which was well 
received by the group present. Miss 
Frances Keiser and Homer Kendall, 
who are co-chairmen of the program 
committee, are putting on a campaign 
to advertise these college prayer meet- 
ings with a view toward a larger at- 
tendance. 



Ursiims Debaters 
Defeat L.V. Lassies 
In Double Combat 



MUNITIONS ARE DISCUSSED 



Shroff and Leisey Travel; Flom 
And Smyser Open Home 
Attack 



The debating season for the women's 
team of L. V. C. opened last Wednesday 
evening, February 20, between Ursinus 
and Lebanon Valley College. The L. V. 
affirmative team, composed of Esther 
Flom and Emma Mary Smyser, met the 
Ursinus negative team composed of Dor- 
othy Thomas and Nancy Pugh in Philo 
Hall at 8:00 o'clock. The L. V. nega- 
tive team, consisting of Marion Leisey 
and Winona Shroff, traveled to Ursinus 
where they met Ellen Smith and Florence 
Roberts, the negative team of that col- 
lege. 

L. V. lost in both places, but many 
signs were evident in regard to the fu- 
ture success of the teams. Although the 
affirmative team is composed entirely of 
new freshmen girls it exhibited a knowl- 
edge of debating experience and a prom- 
ise of better luck later on. The negative 
team is ma'de up of girls who have de- 
bated ever since their arrival at L. V. 

The judges for the debate here at home 
were Major Case of the Casset Broker- 
continued on Page 3, Column 4) 



SENIORS GUESTS 
AT LYNCH HOME 



On Wednesday, February 20, the se- 
nior class was entertained at a tea at the 
home of Dr. and Mrs. Lynch. A very 
enjoyable afternoon was spent in playing 
various games and matching squares— -a 
new puzzle craze that is a graduate from 
the jig-saw school. The sophomores 
helped to stive and entertain. Miss Ruth 
Buck played a solo by Tschaikowsky 
and Mr. Earl Unger played "Neapolitan 
Nights" as only he can play it on his 
trumpet. Mrs. Grimm and Mrs. Butter- 
wick poured tea and cocoa. The seniors 
wish to thank Dr. and Mrs. Lynch for 
the very pleasant party. 



Valley Represented 
at Deans' Convention 



MADAME GREEN ATTENDS 



Valleyites Surprise 
F. & M. Basketeers 

TRIUMPH BY ONE POINT 



Sessions Held At the Chalfonte 36- 35 Setback Shatters Foes' 



And Haddon Hall, At- 
lantic City 



Madame Green represented Lebanon 
Valley College at a convention of nation- 
wide educational importance held from 
Wednesday, February 20, to Saturday, 
February 24, at Atlantic City. The ses- 
sions of the National Association of 
Deans of Women as well as those of the 
National Vocational Guidance Associa- 
tion, the American College Personnel As- 
sociation, and the Teachers College Per- 
sonnel Association were held at the Chal- 
fonte and at Haddon Hall. All the out- 
standing universities and colleges of the 
country were represented. 

One of the most memorable events was 
the banquet on Thursday evening. Such 
notable personalities in attendance were 
the president of the National Education 
Association, the president of the Ameri- 
can Association of University Women, 
the president of the General Federation 
(Continued on Page 3, Column 2) 



Delphians Celebrate 
At Hershey Inn Dance 

The Delphian girls aiid their beaux ar- 
rayed in their best bibs and tuckers re- 
cently went to the Hershey Inn to cele- 
brate their thirteenth anniversary. The 
hall was marked for its simplicity, the 
only decoration being a delta liqhted 
with red and yellow lights —Delphians 
colors. 

Lloyd and Lloyd's orchestra supplied 
the music for the dance. Mruiy i.ovelty 
numbers were played, but the one most 
thoroughly enjoyed was the "College 
Medley." It was a nevv setting for the 
songs, which one ordinarily shouts from 
the grandstands in rain, snow, and sleet 
and was favorably accepted by every- 
one. 

The hostesses were Mrs. Mary Green, 
Mrs. C. A. Lynch, Mrs. S. H. Derick- 
son, and Miss H. R. Meyers. Other 
members of the faculty present wen : Dr. 
Lynch, Dr. Derickson, Dr. and Mrs. 
Stonecipher, Dr. and Mrs. Stiuble, Dr. 
and Mrs. Reynolds, Dr. and Mrs. Wag- 
ner, Mrs. Gossard, Miss Minnie Gossard, 
Dr. and Mrs. P'chie, Mr. and Mrs. Rut- 
ledge, Dr. and Mrs. Wallace, Dr. and 
Mrs. Shenk. The committees in charge 
of the dance are to be commended for 
their work in making the dance a success. 



STUDENT RECITAL 



A Student Recital will be presented 
on Tuesday evening. Those perform- 
ing on this program are: Charlotte 
Stabley, voice; Ida Katharine Hall, 
bass violin; Ethel Keller, piano; Er- 
nest Koch, clarinet; Martha Elser and 
Hugh Strickler, piano. 



Hopes For League 
Victory 



Lebanon Valley's five accomplished 
one of the biggest upsets of the year last 
Wednesday night when they defeated 
the Franklin and Marshall basketeers at 
Lancaster by a 36-35 count. 

The Blue and White quintet showed 
a complete reversal of form over their 
early-season showings to nose cut the F. 
and M. sharp-shooters, considered one of 
the most dangerous aggregations in th« 
league. The defeat pushed the Lancas- 
trians definitely out of the title race, it 
being their third reverse. 

The battle was a nip and tuck affair, 
with the lead changing hands co:.t<nual- 
iy throughout the struggly. With only 
a minute of play remaining. "Charley" 
Rust sent L. V. into a LWO-pcb.it lead by 
calmly converting two free throws. Sec- 
ends later, "Woody" Spona>jgle was 
fouled in a mixup near the F. and M. 
basket and made qooi on the shor to re- 
duce the Valley lead to a lone pc nt with 
twelve seconds to go. Following another 
tap-off, Barthold bat f eJ the ball out of 
Kunds as the timer's whistle e ded the 
saaggle, giving the Metox :;men their 
second triumph in nine starts. 

Charley" Rust, "Stew" Barthold, and 
Paul Billett each scored eleven pou ts for 
L. V. C, with SneJl and Patririo hand- 
ling the back-court work, the former find- 
ing time to add Valley's other three 
points. Coach Metoxen did not resort to 
a single substitution during the game. 

Coach Holmen switched his lineup re- 
peatedly, especially in the closing seconds 
of the game, but "Sam" Jacobs and 
(Continued on Page 4, Column 1) 



Kalo Dinner - Dance 

Plans Under Way 

Kalo is looking forward to a gay anni- 
versary week-end April 5 and 6. Ar- 
rangements concerning the orchestra and 
place for their traditional dinner-dance 
are well under way. 

The couples will dance to the tunes of 
Ira Bowman and his orchestra. This or- 
chestra is acknowledged as one of the 
best in Central Pennsylvania. They play 
regularly at the Penn-Harris hotel in 
Harrisburg and the Hotel Brunswick in 
Lancaster. The Steel Pier at Atlantic 
City and Hershey Ball Room have also 
been played by them. 

Because of the success which attended 
the dance two years ago it will again be 
held at the General Sutter hotel at Lititz. 
This hostelry with its hominess, conge- 
nial comfort, and good food furnished 
an ideal setting for Kalo's dinner-dance. 

The joint Kalo-Delphian play commit- 
tee is working hard to find a suitable and 
(Continued on Page 2, Column 4) 



I 



PAGE TWO 



LA VIE COLLEGIENNE, THURSDAY, FEBRUARY 28, 1935 



Le Voici, Mesdames 




GEORGE J. HILTNER 



la #te (Lollegtenne 

ESTABLISHED 1925 



A weekly publication by the Under- 
graduate Students of Lebanon 
Valley College 



EDITORIAL STAFF 

Helen Earnest, '35... Editor-in-Chief 

George Hiltner, '35 Associate Editor 

Richard Baus, '37 Managing Editor 

David Yake, '36.... Asst. Man. Editor 



REPORTORIAL STAFF 

Catherine Wagner, '35 
Sylvia Evelev, '36 
Louise Gillan, '36 
Lester Krone, '36 
Marian Leisey, 36 
Maxlne Earley, '37 

Grace Naugle, '37 General Reporters 

Ida K. Hall, '35 Conservatory 

William Earnest, '37 Athletics 

Miriam Eichner, '37 Alumni 

Louis Straub, '37 Philokosmian 

Charles Hauck, '35 - Kalozetean 

Jane Shellenberger, 36 - - Clionian 

Marietta Ossi, '35 — Delphian 



BUSINESS STAFF 

Kenneth Sheaffer, '35 Business Manager 

Albert Anderson, '36...Asst. Bus. Manager 

Robert Cassel, '36 Circulation Manager 

Elwood Needy, '37 Asst. Cir. Manager 



Single Copies 5 cents 

Subscription .. 00 per year 



Entered at the Annville, Pa., post 
office as second class matter, under the 
Act of March 3, 1879. 



THURSDAY, FEB. 28, 1935 



WHY THE VALLEY MEN ARE 
SO HANDSOME 



(A Modest Proposal) 
In searching for an appropriate subject 
to discuss in this week's editorial, I found 
myself hard-taxed, and unable to lead 
my wandering thoughts into new realms. 
In despair, I made my plight known and, 
to my utter astonishment, one popular 
co-ed pertly suggested that I write on 
the subject: "Why Lebanon Valley men 
are so handsome." Being naturally sen- 
sitive to feminine criticism (for I knew 
she implied that L. V. men are NOT 
handsome), I gritted my teeth and re- 
solved to retort with bitter refutation. 

Fair co-ed, now that you have implied 
that L. V. men are NOT handsome, we 
shall astound you by proving, through a 
philological review, that you are entire- 
ly correct! Did you know that the word 
"handsome" originally, and therefore, 
truly, meant "convenient"? Well, it does 
whether you know it or not, and there- 
fore we may re-state your suggestion to, 
"Why L. V. Men are so Convenient"—' 
or as you would have it, in reality, "Why 
L. V. Men are NOT so Convenient." 
Now, a convenient man, according to 
the dictionary, would be an accommo- 
dating man, and an accommodating man, 
you will agree, is he who listens to your 
idle chatter with apparent interest, who 
admires your plastic beauty, who foots 
your gluttonous bills, who graces you 
with all the niceties demanded by the so- 
called ethical standards, who politely, 
but with infinite difficulty, sees your point 
of view, and who in every respect ful- 
fills the modern "sucker." Your apparent 
implication was that L. V. men are not 
handsome, or not accommodating, or 
finally, are not the "suckers" you would 
make of them. Therefore, we sardonical- 
ly accept your pretended insult, and fur- 
thermore, we literally wound you with 
your own derisive weapon. 

However, should your humble plea be 
that your question was an earnest one, 
that you did not know, as we, the true 
meaning of the adjective you so kindly 
employed, and that "handsome" for you 



Oh, who is this handsome blond 
Adonis? It is none other than our friend 
and associate, that dignified piece of 
senior, yes, the Baltimore flash*— or in 
simple terms the offspring, pride and joy 
of the Hiltner family— George J. himself, 
}oe to his intimates. 

Now that we have introduced this 
magnet of personality let us offer a list 
of his numerous accomplishments. First 
allow us to congratulate him on the re- 
cent acquisition of two presidencies— 
Philo and the senior class are proud to 
have him head their ranks, and it is with 



refers to our external potentialities, our 
simple and unerring answer would force- 
fully, but modestly, be: "We can't help 
it." 



MEN'S DORM TO BE 

THE CARMEAN'S HOME 

(Continued from Page One) 

This is really an advantage over the for- 
mer practise, for under the new system 
one receives additional numerical credit 
for A's and B's which would naturally 
tend to balance the poorer grades. 

The new methods courses are to be 
offered at alternate semesters; they in- 
clude the teaching of biology, chemistry, 
physics, English, French, general science, 
German, history, Latin, and mathematics. 

The summer sessions of the college will 
open in Harrisburg and Annville on June 
24. Prof. Grimm will teach mathematics, 
a course in methods of secondary educa- 
tion, and elementary education. Prof. 
Gingrich's courses will include school 
law, history of political parties, and a so- 
cial science course. Dr. Butterwick will 
teach child psychology, educational so- 
ciology, and United States history. Me- 
thods in high school science will be taught 
by Dr. Light. Dr. Struble will conduct 
a course in composition, one in English 
methods, and one in contemporary drama. 
A six hour qualitative analysis course 
will be offered by Dr. Bender. Mr. Car- 
mean will conduct several music subjects, 
Dr. E. H. Stevenson a course in methods 
of teaching foreign languages and a four^ 
hour French course. Dr. Bailey will pre- 
sent educational measurements, educa- 
tional psychology, and the psychology of 
adolescence at this summer session. 

All these changes mentioned have been 
accomplished by the finance and execu- 
tive committees of the college, and they 
have been introduced to raise the stand- 
ards of the alma mater. 



surety that we acknowledge his powers 
as a stern and trusty executive. 

Dramatics, newspaper reporting, band 
activities, and May Day dances are sev- 
eral of the extra-curricular activities in 
which this male specimen excels. 

We cannot publish his exact profes- 
sion, but his office apparently seems to be 
located on East Main street, and by 
means of a tactful interview we discov- 
ered that his office hours are all hours, 
and his patient seems to be very fond of 
pale pink nail polish. For the gory de- 
tails see Dr. Hiltner himself— confessions 
of a mill hand. Best of luck, oh George! 



From the men's dorm: 

"Hey, don't spit on the floor." 

"What's the matter, is it leaking?" 



CONSERVE NOTES 



Mr. Spangler, of Harrisburg, played 
a Bach program on Wednesday morn- 
ing. February 20, for the junior and 
senior conservatory classes. Martha El- 
ser appeared on the same program play- 
ing the entire second movement from the 
Mendelsohn's Concerto for violin. Miss 
Elser was accompanied by Mr. Spang- 
ler. This lovely informal recital was 
given in Mrs. Bender's studio. It is our 
sincere wish that we hear more of these 
delightful recitals in the future. 

Last week Martha Elser, violiniste, 
played a program for the Wednesday 
Club in Harrisburg. 

Carla Goya, the well-known young 
Spanish dancer, appeared in a recital on 
Wednesday evening under the auspices 
of the Community Concert Association 
in York, Penna. 

The Violin Quartet, composed of Mar- 
tha Elser, Russell Hatz, Oleta Dietrich, 
and Margaret Paige, will play for the 
Community Service in Hershey this com- 
ing Sunday afternoon. 



KALO DINNER-DANCE 

PLAN UNDER WAY 

(Continued from Page One) 



entertaining play for April 5. Arrange- 
ments are yet to be made for the recep- 
tion to be held after the play presenta- 
tion. 

With a good play and reception to 
start off with and a dinner-dance and 
good music, pleasant surroundings, and a 
delicious meal to follow, is it any won- 
der that Kalo is anxiously awaiting their 
big anniversary week-end? 



I live in the crowd of jollity, not so 
much to enjoy company as to shun my- 
self.—johnson. 



SAINT JOHNSBURY ACADEMY 

Saint Johnsbury, Vermont 

An Old New England Academy in an Old New England Town. Thorough 
preparation for college. Commercial courses. Dormitories for boys and girls. 
Tuition $550 covers all expenses. Scholarship aid for worthy boys and girls. 
WRITE PRINCIPAL STANLEY " 




The Bell Telephone Company of Pennsylvania 



No. 24 



LA VIE COLLEGIENNE, THURSDAY, FEBRUARY 28, 1935 



PAGE THREE 



Bucketeers Score 
Tie With E-town 



MARJORIE SMITH STARS 



Orth and Harkins Plav Good 
Game For L. V. C. With 
Penn Hall 



The last two basketball games played 
by the girls have shown a decided im- 
provement in general technique and in 
the spirit of the team. The game of Sat- 
urday, February 16, played against Eliz- 
abethtown in the Annville High gym 
was one between two well-matched 
teams. Although the Elizabethtown play- 
ers were ahead during most of the game, 
Marjorie Smith's proficient scoring of six 
goals in the second half brought the game 
to a close with a score of 24-24. 

LEBANON VALLEY 

G. F. T. 

Smith, f 9 4 22 

Kreamer, f 

Jagnesak, f 1 2 

Orth, c 

Harkins, sc 

Weirick, g 

Binkley, g 

Kohler, g 

Totals 10 4 24 

ELIZABETHTOWN 

G. F. T. 

M. Groff, f 2 4 8 

Bishop, f 8 16 

Brumbaugh, c 

Barnes, c 

Kapp, sc 

Glasmire, g 

R- Groff, g 

Hess, g 

Totals 10 4 24 

Last Saturday's game with Penn Hall 
was the best played game ot the season 
from the standpoint of Jnfeiest. At the 
end of the first quarter the Lebanon Val- 
ley girls had scored ten points to their 
opponents' si v. Amu Orth and "Jerry" 
Harkins played exceptionally well, but 
when "Jerry" was taken ouc of the game 



for fouling the, team seemed to have lost 
its fighting spirit, and the last period 

closed with a victory for Penn Hall, the 
final score being 28-20. 

The following was last week's line-up: 

LEBANON VALLEY 

G. F. T. 

Smini, f ( 2 14 

Kreamer, f 2 4 

Jagnesak, f 10 2 

Orth, c 

Harkins, sc 

Weirick, g 

Binkley, g 

Totals 9 2 20 

PENN HALL 

G. F. T. 

Batteu, f 4 1 9 

Wright, f 8 3 19 

1 unsford, r. 

P'umb, c ( 

C ask, sc '.0 

iVsh, sc 

Struck, g 

Moore, g . 

Totals 12 4 28 



VALLEY REPRESENTED 

AT DEANS' CONVENTION 



(Continued from Page One) 



of Women's Clubs, the American Asso- 
ciation of Parents and Teachers presi- 
dent and the director of women's work 
in the federal relief administration. 

Mrs. Roosevelt was present at a lunch- 
eon given Friday by the National Asso- 
ciation of Deans of Women. Later she 
addressed a larger assembly upon prob- 
lems of interest to them. 

Two other notable speakers were Miss 
Mary Woolley, president of Mount Hol- 
voke and the dean of Barnard College, 
Miss Virginia Gildersleeve. 

The entire group met from time to time 
for general sessions while frequently sec- 
tional meetings were called for specific 
interests. Certainly a feeling of the big- 
ness of the present educational trend per- 
vaded the convention and its entire pro- 
gram. 



inter-Class Battle 



A triple tie for first place in the inter- 
class league became a possibility Mon- 
day night when the freshmen turned back 
the juniors, 33-25. The frosh had pre- 
viously defeated the sophomores by a 
28-21 count, but had lost to the seniors. 

A victory last night for the second- 
year men in the soph-senior fracas would 
have thrown the seniors, sophs, and 
frosh into a tie for first position, each 
team having registered two wins against 
one defeat. 

"Lut" Long led the first-year men in 
their two victories, scoring 12 points 
against the sophs and 18 against the ju- 
niors. Rader, Keiter, and Harnish paced 
the juniors to a 24-18 lead at the end of 
the third period, but a furious last-ditch 
rally clinched victory for the frosh. In 
the soph-frosh battle last week the sophs 
were pretty well outclassed, Bachman 
and Donmoyer being the only members 
of the losing quintet to account for more 
than one field goal. 



ADMINISTRATION NOTES 



Feb. 24— In the morning Dr. Lynch 
preached the anniversary sermon at 
the New Cumberland U. B. in Christ 
Church, in the afternoon he presided 
as chairman of the National Brother- 
hood meeting at Lebanon in the Co- 
lonial theatre, while in the evening 
he preached at the Salem U. B. 
Church, Reading. 

Feb. 28— Dr. Lynch made the ad- 
dress at the Fathers' and Sons' meet- 
ing at Paradise U. B. Church at Bird- 
-in-hand, Pa. 

March 2 — Dr. Lynch will speak on 
What Is Psychology" at the Wom- 
en's Club of Lebanon in the after- 
noon, while in the evening his subject 
at the Harrisburg Torch Club will be 
"The Church and the Social Order." 

March 3 — The president will preach 
the Educational day sermon at the 
Ironville U. B. Church, Lancaster Co. 

March 7— He will preach the ser- 
mon at the Union Lenten service, 
Lykens. 



EASTERN PENNSYLVANIA 
COLLEGE LEAGUE 



Wednesday, February 20 
Gettysburg 54; Muhlenberg 38. 
Lebanon Valley 36; F. and M. 35. 
Albright 37; Ursinus 35 (extra period). 

Saturday, February 23 
Muhlenberg 49; Ursinus 34. 
Gettysburg 54; Albright 32. 



Standing of the Teams 

W. L. Pet. 

Muhlenberg 9 1 .900 

Gettysburg 8 1 .889 

F. and M 5 3 .625 

Drexel 4 6 .400 

Albright 2 6 .250 

Lebanon Valley 2 7 .222 

Ursinus 1 7 .125 



Tuesday, February 26— Muhlenberg 
vs. Franklin and Marshall. 

Wednesday, February 27— Albright 
vs. Franklin and Marshall. 

Friday, March 1— Ursinus vs. Gettys- 
burg. 

Saturday, March 2— Drexel vs. Al- 
bright; Muhlenberg vs. Lebanon Valley; 
Ursinus vs. Franklin and Marshall. 

Wednesday, March 6— Albright vs. 
Gettysburg; Lebanon Valley vs. Ursinus. 



URSINUS DEBATERS 

DEFEAT L.V. LASSIES 



(Continued from Page One) 



age Company of Lebanon, Mr. Gilliland 
of the Lebanon High School Faculty, and 
Mr. Moyer of the Annville High School 
faculty. Their decision was given unani- 
mously to the visiting school. At Ursinus 
however, there was a tie vote which was 
decided by the audience in favor of Ur- 
sinus. Such luck! 

The following schedule remains for the 
girls to try again to bring back the lau- 
rels to their Alma Mater. March 4 or 6, 
Cedar Crest College; March 13, Eliza- 
bethtown College; March 18, Penn State; 
March 25, Seton Hill. 



GERMAN 




THE RATIONAL 
JOY SMOKE! 



PAGE FOUR 



LA VIE COLLEGIENNE, THURSDAY, FEBRUARY 28, 1935 




M m m m m m ! 
BREAKFAST 
Toasted Raisin Bread 
and 
Coffee 



THE PENNWAY 



Dr. Shenk Has Busy Day 

That former popular song "Little 
Man You've Had a Busy Day" might 
easily be used as Dr. H. H. Shenk's 
theme number for February 20. For 
at 8:45 A. M. he addressed the Lans- 
ford High School, delivered an ad- 
dress before the Palmerton High 
School students at eleven o'clock, ate 
lunch with the American Business 
Men's Club at the Hotel Traylor in 
Allentown, and finally was present at 
a group meeting of the Lehigh Valley 
alumni at six o'clock. The chief busi- 
ness of this session was the election 
of the following officers: President, 
Dr. Joseph D. Rutherford, '17; vice- 
president, Rev. Chester Rettew, '12; 
secretary, Miss Hilda Buckley, '32; 
treasurer, Miss Irene Peter, '30. 



Diary and Teas 

For West Hallites 



VALLEYITES SURPRISE 

F. & M. BASKETEERS 



(Continued from Page One) 



Woody" Sponaugle were the only op- 
ponents wh"o were able to break through 
the Blue and Wr ite defenses. Summary: 

F. AND M. 

G. F. T. 

Jacobs, f 5 2 12 

Snyder, f 

Sponaugle, f-c 6 2 14 

Wenrich, f 

Yeager,- c 113 

Hummer, g 

Martin, g 2 4 

Roddy, g 1 2 

Stolarz, g 

Totals 15 5 35 

LEBANON VALLEY 

G. F. T. 

Rust, f 4 3 11 

Barthold, f 5 1 11 

Billett, c „ 4 3 11 

Patrizio, g 

Snell, g 1 1 3 

Totals 14 8 36 

Referee— Greiner. 



West Hall once more comes to the 
front. Those eleven certainly keep their 
minds open for new ideas. This group of 
young ladies residing in' the little gray 
house on the corner have instituted Sun- 
day afternoon teas. These affairs are to 
be held every other week in West Hall 
parlor any time after three o'clock. Look 
in the rule book and see what that means. 
Each class will have its turn serving as 
hostesses. 

But this is not all. The unique thing 
is the diary— a West Hall diary. This 
record is going to be read at each Sun- 
day afternoon tea, and then passed on 
to another girl to record the events of 
the next two weeks. 

To tune of Alma Mater: 

When we are old and gray, dear 

With children on our knee 

We'll read them the excerpts 

From West Hall diary— 

From this most revered record 

Our brains with loving care 

Will find their parents' actions 

Most boldly laid bare." 



FROSH CONDUCT 

"Y" FRIENDLY HOUR 



The Freshman "Y" Cabinet held a 
very delightful Friendly Hour service 
Sunday, February 24, in North Hall 
parlor. 

After the joint singing of "For the 
Beauty of the Earth," the entire group 
took part in a litany led by Hazel 
Hemingway. Following this, Caro- 
lyn Kohler led in prayer after which 
every one sang "Fairest Lord Jesus." 

The guest speaker of the evening, 
Mrs. Wilt, wife of the new U. B. min- 
ister, was then introduced. In a very 
pleasing manner she talked intimate- 
ly with the girls, stressing the value 
of such an association as the Y. W. 
C. A. to a young girl. 

The meeting was then closed with 
the Lord's Prayer. 




Bob— "Your dress is too short." 

Max— "I don't think so." 

Bob— "Then you must be in it too far. 



"Officer, come quickly, I've just 
knocked down a student!" 

"Sorry, lady, but today's Sunday and 
you can't collect your bounty until to- 
. morrow morning." 



Girl— "I'm selling magazine sub- 
scriptions to help myself through col- 
lege. I'll take something off if you'll take 
it for two years." 

Him— "I'll take it for fifteen." 



Denton— "It's absurd for this man to 
charge us ten dollars for towing us three 



The Logical Place for L. V. C. 
Students to Buy 

BOOKS & SUPPLIES 
ESBENSHADE'S 



38 N. 8th St., Lebanon, Pa. 




Kiviera Restaurant 



Oysters and Crab Cakes 
Breyer's Ice Cream 



Reading Scene 

Of German Movie 



Six members of the German Club 
went to Reading on Friday night to 
see the German movie "Waltz Time 
in Vienna." It was a very entertain- 
ing musical production, with music 
adapted from Strauss and Lanner. 

There was also a comedie entirely 
in German, which was interesting, al- 
though the students complain that the 
speech was too fast, and they missed 
all the jokes. 

Those present were: R. Bright, E. 
Frick, S. Heilman, S. Harclerode, E. 
Messersmith, and W. Powell. 

miles." 

Hauck— "That's all right; he's earning 
it— I have my brakes on." 



Elser— "So you were on a submarine 
too, Louie? What did you do?" 

Straub— "Oh, I used to run forward 
and hold her nose when we wanted to 
take a dive." 



Upper— "Set the alarm for two, 
please." 

Lower— "You and who else?" 



Definition by a freshman: Vision is 
what people think you have when you 
guess correctly. 



"Why in the world did you ever write 
a policy on a man ninety-eight years 
old?" asked the indignant insurance in- 
spector. 

"Well," explained the new agent, "I 
looked in the census report and found 
there were only a few people of that 
age who die each year." 



DAYTON VALLEY ALUMNI 
HOLD ANNUAL MEETING 



(Continued from Page One) 



ed officers to head the association: Presi- 
dent, Bishop A. R. Clippinger; vice- 
president, Dr. V. O. Weidler; secretary- 
treasurer, Dr. John B. Lyter. 



KREAMER BROS. 



Leonard Elec. Refrigerators 
Hoover Electric Sweepers 
Easy Electric Washers 
Gas and Coal Stoves 
Rugs and Linoleums 



Furniture - - Undertaking 



Phone 144 ANNVILLE, PA. 



TOILET ARTICLES 

PATENT MEDICINES 
CIGARS - CIGARETTES 

ANDREW'S 
CUT RATE STORE 

OPPOSITE COURT HOUSE 

8TH a CUMBERLAND STS. 

Lebanon, Pa. 
VISIT OUR FOUNTAIN 



Try ROEMIG'S 

25$ LUNCH 

DELICIOUS SUNDAES 
With That Good Home-Made 
ICE CREAM 



Our Motto Is To Please You 

CENTRAL 
Shoe Repair Shop 

A Trial Will Convince You 



FOR QUALITY 

Baked Products 

PATRONIZE 

FINK'S BAKERY 

MAIN STREET 



D. L. Say lor & Sons 
CONTRACTORS 

LUMBER and COAL 
Annville, Pennsylvania 



20% Discount Sale 

Continuing Throughout Feb. 
Let us help you to Economize 

John Hirsh Dep't Store 



Goodman Brothers 

SODA FOUNTAIN 



CLOTHING OF QUALITY 

J. S. BASHORE 




WE SEAT T/fE WORLD Otf WS/f ORDEfiS 
MAKE US PROVE /T 



LEBANON 740 WALTON 520 WASHINGTON .READING 





Hail, 

'37 'Quittie' 
Staff 



LEBANON VALLEY COLLEGE 



VOL. XI 



ANNVILLE, PENNSYLVANIA, THURSDAY, MARCH 7, 1935 



No. 21 



Valley Basketeers 
Jolt Muhlenberg 
Flag Aspirations 

MULES DEFEATED, 40 - 36 



Blue and White Five Surprises 
High-Flying Opponents; 
Frosh Lose 



Lebanon Valley's "Flying Dutchmen" 
became giant killers for the second time 
in as many games, rudely jarring Muh- 
lenberg's fond hopes of winning the 
Eastern Pennsylvania Collegiate League 
by defeating them, 40-36, in a game 
played last Saturday night on the Leba- 
non High School court. 

The high-scoring Muhlenberg offense, 
built around the six-foot, six-inch center, 
"Legs" Leibensberger, was pretty well 
smothered throughout, with "Bill" Smith 
doggedly tagging his tap-off opponent, 
and Patrizio and Snell ably oerforming 
their back-court duties. 

The game was a thriller, with the lead 
changing hands frequently and neither 
team holding a substantial lead at any 
time. The Blue and White huil» up a 
21-17 lead at half time and managed to 
hold the four-point advantage during the 
closing session, although the Mules bat- 
tled desperately for victory. When Pa- 
trizio was forced out of action by the 
four foul route near the close of the game 
Lebanon Valley's attack bogged down 
temporarily and Muhlenberg came with- 
in one point of tying the score but a Val- 
le y counter-attack staved off defeat and 
clinched the thi'd le gue vie cry for the 
Blue and White courtsters Capt. Bar- 
*old and "Charlie" Rust registc-ed 12 
a °d 1 1 points respectively at the forward 
Positions to lead the seeing for Valley. 
B'H Smith accounted for 7 points and 
(Continued on Page 3, Column 2) 



commerce club 
reorganizes 



^"he Commerce Club was reorganized 
at a recent meeting of business adminis- 
p atl0n students under the direction of 

r °f- M. Lonsdale Stokes. About forty- 
°r nfty students turned out at this 
d PPeal. 

a If w as decided to make the club a real 

1Ve organization with bi-weekly meet- 
'ng s , 7 
li h Prominent business men to en 



s *sslo 



e n the club members at their regular 



"le T*' ^ din ner is also to be held at 

^'°se of the school term. 
p res . e following officers were elected: 
d ent ent - C. Edward Arndt; vice-presi- 
Albert Anderson; secretary- trea- 



sury L 



°is Harbold. 



committee to arrange a con- 
tiv e time * or trie meetings and attrac- 
JHJijji ? Simulating programs was ap- 
cha ir e ' insisting of: Philip Denton, 
*e r r! an ' k° uise Shearer, George Smelt- 



Earnest and Straub 
To Head '37 'Quittie' 

At a recent meeting of the sopho- 
more class the main "Quittie" officers 
were elected. The editorship for the 
1937 volume goes to William H. 
Earnest of Lebanon. His outstanding 
scholarship and previous journalistic 
work not only in the La Vie Colle- 
gienne but also local newspapers 
should capably fit him for his posi- 
tion. 

Louis Straub was named as business 
manager. The various other staff 
members will be selected in the imme- 
diate future and their names disclosed 
at a later date. With these two com- 
petent leaders at the helm, the sopho- 
mores promise a successful 1937 
Quittie." 



Rev. Wilt Entertains 
Life Work Recruits 



DELIVERS SHORT TALK 



Alma Cline and Harold Beames- 
derfer Help To Entertain 
The Guests 



On the evening of February 28 Rev. 
and Mrs. Wilt entertained the Life Work 
Recruits at the college church parsonage. 
Dr. Wilt, who has shown a lively inter- 
est in student affairs u.iring his two 
months' pastorate here, delivered a short 
talk in which 1 e expressed his pleasure 
at the presence of the group and in which 
he briefly outlined several goals siid pro- 
jects for the Life Work Recruits. At the 
conclusion of this address Mrs. Wilt, as- 
sisted by Ethel, the chnrmin.j daughter 
of the host and hostess, ass-r u c! charge 
of the meeting. 

Miss Alma Cline— the girl from 'way 
down south— delighted the audience with 
a recitation entitled "I Want to Go To- 
morrow." Harold Beamesderfer, whose 
Pennsylvania Dutch is natural, next de- 
livered two German style monologues 
which were thoroughly enjoyed. Then, 
at the direction of Mrs. Wilt, numerous 
games were played, some of which taxed 
the minds of the participants, while others 
brought embarrassing situations such as 

(Continued on Page 3, Column 3) 



Reynold's Neophytes 
Trip To High School 

The second semester has begun, and 
it brings a change for many of the se- 
niors. New practice teachers have em- 
barked on a new and amusing sea of ex 
perience They are as follows: 

Richard Ax, Sophomore Algebra; Stu 
art Barthold, Freshman Algebra; Galen 
Baugher, Problems of Democracy; Frank 
Boran, Sophomore, European History; 
Rose Dieter, Freshman Algebra; Betty 
Ford, Junior French; Charles Furlong, 
General Science; William Gerber, Junior 
English; Henry Grimm, Physics; Eld- 
ridge Hartman, Civics; George Hiltner, 
Senior French; Clyde Magee, Senior 
Business Arithmetic; Samuel Polk, Ju 
nior History; Gerald Russell, Biology; 
Charles Rust, Sophomore History; Al 
bert Sincavage, Civics; Pauline Snavely, 
Junior German; Arthur Spickler, Fresh- 
man General Science; David Thompson, 
Freshman English; Philip Underwood, 
Sophomore Biology; Richard Walborn, 
Problems of Democracy; Margaret Wea- 
ver, Sophomore Algebra. 

The methods class too has different 
members. They are: 

Dorothy Balsbaugh, Francis Bauer, 
Adam Bigler, Ruth Bright, Virginia Brit- 
ton. Elizabeth Carl, Robert Cassell, Rob- 
ert Etter, Sylvia Evelev. Victor Fridin- 

( Continued on Page 4, Column 3) 



Thespians Prepare 
Club Performance 



SEVEN MEMBERS IN CAST 



Handsome, Unmarried Rector Is 
Surrounded By His Femi- 
nine Parishioners 



"The Rector," a short one-act play, is 
to be the next presentation of the Wig 
and Buckle Club. The plot concerns a 
handsome rector of a small town church. 
He is unmarried, and consequently a few 
of the fairer members of the congregation 
have their "cap set" for him. 

A certain Miss Trimball is especially 
kind to him and utilizes the meeting, 
which is to decide what color the church 
carpet is to be. The rector, however, re- 
fuses to succumb to her wiles, even 
though she does have the church busy- 
body, Mrs. Lemmingworth, on her side. 

(Continued on Page 4, Column 2) 



The Call of Spring and Dan Cupid 



ear » Gasteiger. 



Have you noticed the letter-writing 
epidemic that is breaking out on our 
campus? Our students are so eager to 
carry out a sociological experiment (?) 
that they are rushing to the matrimonial 
bureaus for likely material. Professor 
Gingrich little realized when he asked 
for a volunteer to make a survey of ma- 
trimonial agencies what a furor he would 
create. Among the match-making clubs 
patronized are: Cupid's Club (quite apro- 
pos, isn't it?), Sweethearts' Club, Elsa 



Thorpe Correspondence Club, and the 
Standard Correspondence Club. 

It really is surprising to see the num- 
ber of modest men and women who de- 
scribe themselves in the lists as "very 
good-looking, wealthy, intelligent, and of 
a very affectionate and considerate dis- 
position." One of the testimonials stated: 
"Four years ago I met a very congenial 
mate through your service. She died 
three months ago, so could you please 
(Continued on Page 4, Column 1) 



Band Will Resume 
Concert Work With 
Two Engagements 

GLEN AND LEECH STAR 



Chambersburg and York To Be 
Scene of Efforts of 35-Piece 
Band 



Since football season the band has 
been comparatively idle, but now, thanks 
to the efforts of preachers' sons, this con- 
dition will soon end. So far the band 
has been able to secure two engagements, 
and there are more in prospect. These 
two engagements are: Monday, March 
25, in the Chambersburg U. B. Church 
and Tuesday, April 9, in the Fourth U. 
B. Church at York. The engagements 
were arranged by Glen and Leech, two 
hard-playing, band member, ministers' 
sons. 

Prof. Rutledge, in rehearsals, has been 
working on many very good concert 
numbers, and since it was learned that 
these concerts would be rendered in and 
sponsored by a church, selections of a 
sacred type are being added to the reper- 
toire. Although the program has not, as 
yet, been fully arranged, those interested 
may be assured that it will be a well- 
balanced program, including heavy class- 
ical to light unique numbers, from the 
ridiculous to the sublime and vice versa. 
Prof. Rutledge has spent much time in 
making selections of the numbers that 
best fit the ability and instrumentation 
of the band, and that is of a high quality. 

It may be noted that the concert band, 
comprised of about thirty-five pieces, will 
be making the trips rather than the whole 
fifty-piece band. 



DRAMA LEAGUE 
OFFERS AWARDS 



The Drama League Travel Bureau, a 
non-commercial organization, has at its 
disposal scholarships covering full tuition 
for the six weeks summer session at the 
Central School of Speech and Drama, 
affiliated with the University of London. 
These scholarships are primarily intend- 
ed for students interested in literary and 
drama study, but are also given for the 
more important purpose of promoting in- 
ternational understanding. The bureau \s 
very eager that the donors of lr>ese schol- 
arships shall not be disappointed in the 
response to the unusual opportunity of- 
fered American students. 

Students of the theatre and teachers of 
drama and its allied arts are eligible to 
come before the committee on awards, 
and application blanks may be obtained 
from the League's headquarters in Essex 
House, New York. All letters of inquiry 
concerning the granting of scholarships 
will be welcomed. 



PAGE TWO 



LA VIE COLLEGIENNE, THURSDAY, MARCH 7, 1935 



la Viz dollegtemte 

ESTABLISHED 1925 



A weekly publication by the Under- 
graduate Students of Lebanon 
Valley College 



Clionian President 



EDITORIAL STAFF 

Helen Earnest, '35...„ ......Editor-in-Chief 

George Hiltner, '35 Associate Editor 

Richard Baus, '37 Managing Editor 

David Yake, '36 Asst. Man. Editor 

REPORTORIAL STAFF 

Catherine Wagner, '35 
Sylvia Evelev, '36 
Louise Gillan, '36 
Lester Krone, '36 
Marian Leisey, 36 
Maxine Earley, '37 

Grace Naugle, '37 General Reporters 

Ida K. Hall, '35 Conservatory 

William Earnest, '37 Athletics 

Miriam Eichner. '37 Alumni 

Louis Straub, '37 Philokosmian 

Charles Hauck, 35 Kalozetean 

Jane Shellenberger, 36 Clionian 

Marietta Ossi, '35 - Delphian 

BUSINESS STAFF 

Kenneth Sheaffer, ^......Business Manager 

Albert Anderson, '36...Asst. Bus. Manager 

Robert Cassel, '36 Circulation Manager 

Elwood Needy, '37 Asst. Cir. Manager 

•Single Copies 5 cents 

Subscription _ $1-00 per year 

Entered at the Annville, Pa., post 
office as second class matter, under the 
Act. of March 3, 1879. 

THURSDAY, MARCH 7, 1935 
"RAH-RAH" ERA, GOODBYE 

For my more serious readers, a recent 
topic of interest both in the newspapers 
and magazine articles has been the hail- 
ing of the end of the "rah-rah" era in 
rhe colleges today. The New York 
Times and the Literary Digest are among 
the prominent journalistic organs which 
have featured this rather startling con- 
clusion. 

— Dr. Walter A. Jessup in his Carnegie 
Foundation report is the leading insti- 
gator of this piece of information. He 
points out the fact that the student of to- 
day is interested in world affairs, govern- 
ment, and social and political economy. 
This new serious creature is supplanting 
the former campus playboy. "It can al- 
most be said that the present college stu- 
dent is the person that the college pro- 
fessor was asking for a decade ago." 
Can you recall your high school impres- 
sions of the college youth? A fur coat 
seemed an essential part of this indi- 
vidual's make-up with loud socks, bril- 
liant ties, blazing jackets, and a flashy 
car. The moneyed male who lived in an 
exclusive fraternity house and spent lav- 
ishly his father's. -payroll for many expen- 
sive and unnecessary amusements. 

Let us turn to Woodrow Wilson's es- 
say on "What is a college for?", a liter- 
ary product of the "rah-rah" age, for we 
find in its pages the allusion to the multi- 
ferous outside interests of the usual col- 
lege boy. Wilson says "the side-shows 
are so numerous, so diverting,— so im- 
portant, if you will,— that they have 
swallowed up the circus, and those who 
perform in the main tent must often whis- 
tle for their audiences, discouraged, and 
humiliated." Educators today apparently 
disagree with this voice, for their present 
claim stresses the fact that undergradu- 
ates are more serious, probably due in 
part to the leveling force of the depres- 
sion which astonishingly decreased the 
number of rich, pampered youths and put 
a premium on college educations. One 
newspaper editor adds that "students now 
want dollar for dollar value in education," 
and another claims that "the depression 




Hearsay 

From The 
Contributor's Box 



March 6, 1935. 



Editor of La Vie, 



EMMA J. REINBOLD 



Having but recently praised one of our 
male senior class members the lot falls 
this week to a prominent feminine figure 
on the Lebanon Valley campus. To you, 
Emma Jane Reinbold, we raise our hand 
in salute. Clio is proud to claim her as 
second semester president, for past years 
have proved her worth such as the por- 
trayal of that difficult character in the 
fall pantomime when Emma played Sit' 



ting Bull to perfection. This cheerful 
countenance was also seen on the hockey 
team as the determined keeper of the goal 
for the honor of L. V. C. We are told 
that her long suits are German and Eng- 
lish, but should the life of a teacher be 
too much for our friend, she has great 
possibilities in digging cars out of snow 
piles when the weather permits, and sling- 
ing hash to irate customers during the 
sunny summer months. 



has killed Joe College." Are these not 
years when a great majority of our stu- 
dents are working their way through 
school, or at least in part sharing the 
financial burden of these years of higher 
learning? How many of us have put our 
hands to the plough, as it were, either 
during the summer months or throughout 
the actual school term to do our bit to re- 
main a college student, when in former 
years thoughts of working for a college 
education were indeed far remote or even 
considered impossible? 

Do we not recall our own high school 
days not so far distant when the "side- 
shows" were of prime importance? Books 
were not taken home, but were rather re- 
tained in the school room, and clubs, dra- 
matics, and athletics occupied the top 
rung of the educational ladder. Our pub- 
lic schools are also undergoing a decided 
change toward a more serious and prac- 
tical goal; therefore, our prospective col- 
lege men and women will be of a hard- 
working, serious-minded type as well. 

The nationwide turn of the tide against 
the fraternity and the sorority is an indi- 
cation of this movement. The new prac- 
tise of a faculty family residing in the 
men's dormitory on our own campus 
might be cited as a definite outcome of 
the changing student personality Com- 
plaining parents want the proper atmos- 
phere for their children to secure the best 
results from this education bought in 
many cases at a sacrifice. The impor- 
tance of such campus organizations as 
the International Relations Club might 
be a proof of Dr. Jessup's theory of the 
changed student's interests. 

In closing, let us include Wilson's rea- 
son for the college: "a discipline which 
will fit men for the contests and achieve- 
ments" of modern living, and let us look 
around on our own campus for indica- 
tions of its being put into active practise 
in our modern world of struggle and 
practicality. 



PROGRAM ENJOYED AT 

STUDENT RECITAL 



The following program was enjoyed at 
the student recital in the Engle Conserva- 
tory Tuesday evening, March 5: 

Gavotte Martini 

Neapolitan Dance Goodrich 

Hugh Strickler, Piano 

Sans Souci Heacox 

Ida Katharine Hall, String Bass 

Sunlight Through Leaves Burleigh 

Rigaudon v . MacDowell 

Martha Elser, Piano 

Villanella ! Labate 

Ernest Koch, Clarinet 

Du bist die Ruhe Schubert 

Nur wer die Sehnsucht kennt 

Tschaikowsky 

Bend Low O Dusky Night Kroeger 

Dawn on the Desert Ross 

Charlotte Stabley, Mezzo Soprano 

Chromatic Fantasy and Fugue Bach 

Ethel Keller, Piano 
Violin Quartet— Martha Elser, Oleta 
Dietrich, Russell Hatz, Margaret Paige. 
Accompanists — Ruth Buck, Kathleen 
Pool. 



'OTHERS" IS TOPIC 

FOR PRAYER SERVICE 



The regular student mid-week pray- 
er meeting was held Wednesday night, 
February 27, in the Philokosmian hall. 
Miss Rae Anna Reber, a student in the 
conservatory of music, opened the 
service by playing an appropriate pre- 
lude on the piano. Miss Ethel Houtz 
then read the Scripture lesson and led 
in a prayer. The address of the eve- 
ning was delivered by Miss Alma 
Cline, who spoke on the subject 
"Others." 



For a number of years I have observed 
the none too friendly relations between 
day and dormitory students— especially 
in political affairs. The situation has 
reached an alarming proportion during 
the current school year. The potential 
hatred frequently breaks forth in class 
meetings and would undoubtedly end in 
fist fights if the group were a bunch of 
"ward-heelers" instead of collegians. 

Elections are ofttimes prearranged— 
the meeting of the group merely a for- 
mality wherewith to dispense of the un- 
pleasant suspicion of "cut-and-dried" 
elections. 

Only once has this practice become 
ridiculously obvious. When the elections 
for officers of a certain class were held 
early this term the politic 5 ans were upset 
when their plans went awry by an un- 
usual attendance of the "other group." 
But the election was declared a fake be- 
cause the winner did not have an over- 
whelming majority of votes, and a re- 
election was held— not only one time but 
also a third time. It was interesting to 
note that the winner carried a less ma- 
jority vote than had the winner in the 
first election. 

But why stir up old, rotten muck? It 
is all past and gone and forgiven. How- 
ever, for the future we mu«t hold a 
thought— a thought for the well-being of 
the whole. If more friendly relations ex- 
ist between the two groups our campus 
organizations, our publications, and our 
social affairs will all be an outgrowth of 
the best in the classes. 

Cast aside the political views at the 
elections and choose the best situated 
and most capable representative for the 
positions. Discord can not exist where 
such cooperation and good feehngs pre- 
vail. .1 
Very truly yours, 

SNIFFY. 



ADMINISTRATION NOTES 



Sunday, March 10— Dr. Lynch will 
address the Lebanon Trinity U. B. 
Church, conduct the Y. M. C. A. ves- 
pers in the early evening, and wind 
up his day of rest by preaching at 
the Palmyra II. B. 

Tuesday, March 12— Dr. Lynch 
will address the Annville High School 
group. 

Wednesday, March 13— At the Py- 
thian Hall, State street, Harrisburg. 
Dr. Lynch will make an address to the 
De Molay in celebration of their 
tenth anniversary. 

Thursday, March 14— Dr. Creigb' 
ton of Swarthmore College will ad' 
dress the faculty at a supper confer' 
ence. 

Friday, March 15— Opening an " 
nual meeting of Southern Conventio 11 
district of Pennsylvania State Edu c3 ' 
tional Association to be held at He f 
shey, at which Dr. Lynch will p rC 
side. , 

Saturday, March 16— As head 
the department of higher educati * 1 
Dr. Lynch will again preside at f ^ e 
district meeting. 



• 



LA VIE COLLEGIENNE, THURSDAY, MARCH 7, 1935 



PAGE THREE 



I 

I 



Ursinus Players 
Swamp Kenyonites 

44-18, FINAL SCORE 

Rally In Last Quarter Fails — 
M. Smith Outstanding 
Player 

Despite the fact that a strenuous effort 
was made by the L. V. female basketeers 
qv the game with the Ursinus girls' team 
at Collegeville on Friday afternoon, 
March 1, the opposing side carried away 
the honors with a 44-18 score. 

Once more Marjorie Smith, the L. V. 
C. flash, exhibited unusual prowess in 
shooting goals from disadvantageous 
points of the floor. Likewise, the entire 
team seemed to play together as a single 
unit; but somehow or other the Ursinus 
bucketeers were more proficient. At least 
some reason has to be given for their 
win and the L. V. C. loss. 

One factor was outstanding, and that 
was the fact that the "Kenyonites" were 
able to make their foul shots, which was 
not evident with the fair opponents. 
Smith, Kreamer, Jagnesak, and Harkins 
all showed fine spirit here. 

L. v. c. 

G. F. T. 

Smith, rf 4 4 12 

Kreamer, If 12 4 

Jagnesak, c 2 2 

Orth, c 

Harkins, sc 

Weirick, rg 

Binkley, lg 

Totals 12 6 18 

URSINUS 

G. F. T. 

Godshall, rf 7 14 

Ware, rf 1 2 

Erdman, If 5 10 

Francis, If 9 18 

Fenton, c 

Deitrick, sc 

Myers, rg 

Richard, lg 

Totals 44 44 



VALLEY BASKETEERS 

DEFEAT MUHLENBERG 



(Continued from Page One) 



Snell tallied four sensational long shots 
on as many tries for 8 points. Cuchran, 
Lepore, and Leibensberqor showed the 
way for the Mules, the former scoring 
high with five field goals and one foul 
for 1 1 points. 

In the preliminary tilt, Kie L. V. Frosh 
fell victim to the fast-moving a' f ack of 
the Consumers' Ice quintet of the Leba- 
non City League by a 34-24 count. The 
yearlings were held to five field goals by 
the Lebanonians and it was their ability 
to convert free throws that kept the game 
from becoming a complete rout. Aungst, 
Frosh center, grabbed high-sccr:'ng lau- 
rels for the tilt, with 10 poir.ts on 2 field 
god s and 6 fouls, K'ett and Loiah of 
the ( pposing quintet, and Billctt and Tin- 
dall of the Blue and White trailing close 
behind. Summaries: 



Lorah, g 3 

Kilmoyer, g 1 

Whitman, g 2 

Totals ... 14 

L. V. C. FRESHMEN 

G. 

Billett, f 1 

Tindall, f 2 

Aungst, c 2 

Klipa, g 

Rozman, g 

Kroske, g 

Seaks, g 

Totals 5 

Referee— Moyer. 



F. 
5 
2 
6 


1 




7 
4 

5 

34 

T. 
7 
6 

10 


1 




14 24 



IRC Holds Session 

In Seminar Rooms 



LEBANON VALLEY 

G. 

Rust, f 5 

Barthold, f-g 4 

Kinney, f 

Smith, c 2 

Patrizio, g 1 

Snell, g 4 

Totals 1, x6 

MUHLENBERG 

G. 

Cuchran, f 5 

Grossman, f 

Lepore, f 2 

Leibensberger, c 4 

Rodgers, g 2 

Skrovanek, g 2 



F. 
1 
4 

3 





.15 



Totals 

Referee— Boger. 

consumers' 

G. 

Klett, f 4 

Miller, f 1 

Fox, f-c 1 

Ehrhorn, c 2 



F. 


2 




T. 
11 
12 

7 
2 



40 

T. 
11 





"Individualism versus Collectivism" 
was the subject of the last International 
Relations Club meeting. It was held at 
the regular time, Thu.sda> afternoon at 
3:30, in the new seminar roo.a directly 
above the library. After a short business 
meeting the topic was thrown open for 
general discussion. Boyd Shaffer was the 
speaker of the meeting and led in the dis- 
cussion. After an hour's debate, the opin- 
ion of the group was put to a vote. 

The International Relations Cub would 
like the student body to know that it is 
not a history club. It is an open ^orum 
for the discussion of current p'oHems. 
Every one on campus is cordia.'y in- 
vited to attend and to enter into these 
round-table discussions. 



REV. WILT ENTERTAINS 

LIFE WORK RECRUITS 



(Continued from Page One) 



former love affairs and so forth to light. 

In conclusion to this very enjoyable 
evening Mrs. Wilt served some very de- 
licious refreshments. The guests of hon- 
or were Mrs. Clyde A. Lynch and Dr. 
and Mrs. G. A. Richie. 



Triple Tie Results 
From Soph Victory 

PLAYOFFS ARE SCHEDULED 

Seniors Play Frosh Tonight — 
Victor To Meet Sophs 
In Final 

The first play-off game of the inter- 
class league will be staged tonight on 
the college gym floor between the Senior 
and Frosh quintets, the winner to meet 
the Sophomores next Monday in the final. 

The Sophomores made a play-off nec- 
essary when they defeated the Seniors 
last week, throwing the league into a 
triple tie, with only the Juniors, who lost 
three straight, eliminated. 

The score of the Senior-Soph battle 
was 35-30, Bachman, Donmoyer, and 
Loose scoring high for the second-year 
men, and Ax and Baugher leading the 
Seniors. The Sophs trailed 12-11 at half- 
time but stepped out in the third period 
to take a three-point lead, which they in- 
creased to five by the time the final whis- 
tle blew. The summaries: 
SOPHOMORES 

G. F. T. 

Donmoyer, f 4 8 

Flocken, f 1 1 3 

Holtzman, f 

Heisch, c 2 4 

Bachman, g 6 12 

Brosius, g 

Straub, g 2 2 

Loose, g 3 6 

Totals 16 3 35 

SENIORS 

G. F. T. 

Arndt, f 2 1 5 

Kanoff, f 1 2 4 

Ax, f-c 4 1 9 

Sincavage, c 2 4 

Baugher, g 3 6 

Boran, g . 

Shroyer, g 10 2 

Totals 13 4 30 

Sophomores 6 5 12 12—35 

Seniors 4 8 8 10-30 



PSYCHOLOGY 




PAGE FOUR 



LA VIE COLLEGIENNE, THURSDAY, MARCH 7, 1935 




LYNCHS ENTERTAIN 

JUNIORS AT PARTY 



The second of the delightful series 
of teas which Dr. and Mrs. Lynch 
have been giving was neld last week 
for the members of the "junior class. 
Mrs. Green acted as hostess while 
Mrs. Wallace and Mrs. Gingrich pre- 
sided at the tea table. Freshmen girls 
Carolyn Kohler, Catherine Mills, Lena 
Risser, and Louise Stoner served. 

At various times throughout the af- 
ternoon entertaining features were 
presented. Catherine Mills sang very 
charmingly two lovely songs, "Syl- 
via" and "Sleepy Hollow Tune." 
Cleverly dressed as an old Dutch 
woman, Mary Zartman gave two 
amusing readings, "At the Theatre" 
and "The Gooseberries." Finally, 
Margaret Paige, playing in an accom- 
plished manner, rendered two violin 
solos. She chose to play "Adagio" 
and "To a Wild Rose." 



THHE CALL OF SPRING 

AND DAN CUPID 



(Continued from Page One) 



give me another suggestion?" 

The following are excerpts from the 
epistolary Don Juans and Circes: 

"I am very much interested in music, 
and if we could get together I would 
love to play a duet with you with one 
hand." He certainly must appreciate 
music. 

An ardent lover writes: "You certain- 
ly are the answer to all my prayers. 
Ever since I was ten years old I've been 
praying for God to send me someone 
like you." And this after the first letter! 

An advertised college graduate writes 
thusly, "I have join a correspondent club 
and I seen your name in it so I thought 
I would write to you to make friends by 
letter. I am thirty year old, ht. 6 feet tall, 
wt. 185 heavy, have a every good char- 
acter and I was never married in my life, 
but will if the right woman come along. 
I will be disappoint if you doe not ans. 
this letter. Your truly, J. S." 

One lonely heart wonders, "You have 
me lying awake worrying how tall you 
are and if you have a nice pretty rose- 
bud mouth, one that is meant for the 
angels to kiss." 

An alluring retired farmer complains, 
"I am not satisfied there is something 
missing. I want the love of a good wom- 
an who can take it an it will be recipro- 
cated. I have nothing except a lot of 
love to lavish on one particular young 
lady I am a one woman man. From your 
description you must be a beautiful bunch 
of loveliness sure would love to see you. 
I am very lonely an am pretty sure you 
are the girl I have always been seeking 
but have never found, Adios Senorita 
mia." 

One ambitious young man evidently 



M m m m m m ! 
BREAKFAST 
Toasted Raisin Bread 
and 
Coffee 



has the wrong impression of the bureaus, 
for he says, "I am very affectionate, ex- 
travagantly so, and extremely susceptible 
to anything feminine, even letters, from 
denial of anything more. I am curious 
to know if you might not be a willing 
accomplice to my inclinations. I hope 
you are not another one of these false 
alarms that start off so intriguing and 
turn out to be just another sweet young 
thing that'll start backing up and calling 
for help the minute the water starts get- 
ting the least bit deep." 

Now don't all come rushing at once. 
Lebanon Valley may be known as a ma- 
trimonial center but we don't furnish 
names or addresses. 



THESPIANS PREPARE 

CLUB PERFORMANCE 



(Continued from Page One) 



Instead, he asks the advice of the prac- 
tical heroine, Margaret Norton, and con- 
fesses that he really loves a sweet, un- 
assuming girl, Victoria Knox. 

Janie, the maid, evidently feels it her 
duty to protect her master firm these 
women, but her efforts are of no avail 
and his choice is made. 

The cast is: 

John Herresford Robe-t Spohn 

Margaret Norton Sylva Harclerode 

Victoria Knox -.Louhe Stoner 

Mrs. Lemmingworth Gn> :c Naugle 

Mrs. Munsey Lois Harbold 

Miss Trimball Dorothy Kreamer 

J anie Martha Faust 

Kotty McAdam is directing this pro- 
duction, which is already undei way. 



The Logical Place for L. V. C. 
Students to Buy 

BOOKS & SUPPLIES 
ESBENSHADE'S 

38 N. 8th St., Lebanon, Pa. 

Riviera Restaurant 

Oysters and Crab Cakes 
\*+%% 

Breyer's Ice Cream 



Our Motto Is To Please You 

CENTRAL 
Shoe Repair Shop 

A Trial Will Con vince You 

TOILET ARTICLES 

PATENT MEDICINES 
CIGARS - CIGARETTES 

ANDREW'S 
CUT RATE STORE 

OPPOSITE COURT HOUSE 

8TH a CUMBERLAND STS. 

Lebanon. Pa. 
VISIT OUR FOUNTAIN 



Diary Installment 
Read At West Hall 



The first of West Hall's bi-weekly 
teas was given on March 3 by the 
seniors of that dormitory. As the 
party was postponed from three 
o'clock in the afternoon to ten o'clock 
in the evening, it may, perhaps, be 
more accurately termed a "feed" than 
a tea. 

However, in spite of the postpone- 
ment, tea WAS served and the first 
installment of the West Hall diary 
WAS read as planned. Miss Cathe- 
rine Wagner, hall president, had been 
keeping the diary for two weeks, and 
the first installment reflected admira- 
bly the dormitory atmosphere of West 
Hall as well as recording the out- 
standing events on the campus— often 
with humorous comments. 

Miss Elizabeth Carl was chosen to 
continue the writing of the diary. The 
next installment will be read on the 
afternoon of March 17 when West 
Hall's juniors will give the next tea. 



REYNOLD'S NEOPHYTES 
TRIP TO HIGH SCHOOL 



(Continued from Page One) 



ger, June Gingrich, Marion Leisey, Hazel 
March, Howard Nye, Samuel Polk, 
Mary Jane Shellenberger, Robert Shol- 
ter, Winona Shroff, Bovd Sponaugle, 
Christine Smith. 



Goodman Brothers 

SODA FOUNTAIN 




KREAMER BROS. 



Leonard Elec. Refrigerators 
Hoover Electric Sweepers 
Easy Electric Washers 
Gas and Coal Stoves 
Rugs and Linoleums 



Furniture - - Undertaking 



Phone 14 4 ANNVILLE. PA. 



Bargains in Fine Books 



Great Works of Art— And 
What Makes Them Great— 



by Ruckstull $1.89 

The Mansions of Philosophy— 

by Will Durant 1.43 

Modern Painting— by Mather .... 1.46 
Pageant of Civilization— by Bro- 

deur 1.46 

Romance of Archaeology— by 

Magoffin 1.59 

The Roget Thesaurus— Ed. by 

Mawson 1.39 

Story of Biology— by Locy 1.54 

Stories of Great Operas and 

Their Composers— by Ernest 

Newman 1.47 

Droll Stories— by Balzac 1.69/ 

The Decameron Boccaccio 1 .79 

Mv Life As An Explorer— by 

Sven Hedin 1.59 

Major Mysteries of Science— by 

Garbedian 1.39 

The Modern Encyclopedia- 
Latest Edition 1.95 

Dictionary %if Politics 2.50 



BOLLMAN'S 

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LEBANON. PA. 



Try ROEMIG'S 

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Van Heusen Shirts 

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THE PENNWAY 




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More Luck 




Next Year 




- — — 



LEBANON VALLEY COLLEGE 



VOL. XI 



ANNVILLE, PENNSYLVANIA, THURSDAY, MARCH 14, 1935 



No. 22 



Second Successful 
Mothers' Week-end 

CONGRATULATIONS Y.WC.A. 

Concert and Tea Are Special 
Featured Programs For 
Guests 



Mothers' Week End which has now 
become an annual occasion had its first 
anniversary the week end of March 9. 
The affair last year was completely suc- 
cessful, and it was equally as enjoyable 
this year. The Y. W. C. A. is to be con- 
gratulated. 

The first event of note was the con- 
cert given on Saturday afternoon by the 
girl;' band, which displayed some of the 
mat outstanding talent on the campus. 
The affair lasted for an hour or so, and 
was thoroughly enjoyed by all. 

Shortly after the concert a picture of 
the mothers and daughters was taken on 
North Hall steps, then a picture of the 
girls' land. 

Saturday evening the girls entertained 
their mothers either at the basketball 
game, at a movie, or by shoDping. Later 
in the evening they demonstrated dormi- 
tory "feeds" at the expense of the guests 
in most cases. 

Sunday morning saw most of the host- 
esses and guests at the church ser.ice. 

Sunday afternoon the mothers were en- 
t.rtained at a tea given in their honor. 
The hostess was Miss Lena Cockshott, 
and Mrs. Wallace and Miss Myers 
poured. The parlor of North Hall was 
the scene of the tea and it was prettily 
adorned with daisies and sweet peas. The 
mothers had been presented with a beau- 
tiful talisman rose and some ferns just 
before dinner. The flowers were the con- 
tribution of the freshman Y Cabinet. The 
freshman cabinet also served at the tea. 
Besides the mothers, there were several 
faculty wives and some of the 1 iculty, 
including Mrs. Green and Miss Gille^oie, 
Present. 



New Commerce Club To 
Hear Mr. James Kinnev T 



The newly-reorganized Commerce Club 
na s had the good fortune to obtain the 
Presence of a prominent official of the 
loc al branch of the Bethlehem Steel Cor- 
poration to speak to it at its first meeting, 

Mr, James Kinney, a superintendent at 
tne Lebanon plant, has consented to 
•"Peak on the subject of "The N.R.A. and 
tnp Steel Industry" on March 19. He is 
NVc 'l qualified to show the club many con- 
^i'ions which are unknown to the general 
Public. It is with great anticipation that 

c members look forward to Irs coming 
to tr, e campus. 

Thh rneeting should not be missed by 
' n V nember of the organization. I f prom- 
s' to be both interesting and instructive. 

" e entire club should turn out on Tues- 
/ March 19, and be present at Philo 
lo11 at 8 P. M. to hear this noted and 
'• formed industrialist. 



1937 Quittie Staff 

The editor and business manager of 
the 1937 Quittapahilla announce the 
following staff: 

Associate editors^Grace Naugle, 
Richard Baus. 

Literary editors— Ruth Buck, Max- 
ine Earley, Miriam Etehner, Karl 
Flocken, Lois Harbold, Charles Kin- 
ney, Eleanor Lynch, Duey Unger. 

Sports editors— Edward Schmidt, 
Allen Rutherford. 

Arts editors — Howard Reber, Ken- 
neth Eastland. 

Business associates— Elwood Needy, 
Edward Bachman, George Smeltzer. 



Dribblers Lose Two; 
Finish In Loop Cellar 

LIONS AND BEARS WIN 



Defeats In Final Two Games 
Sink Five Into Last-Place 
Tie With Ursinus 



After displaying real championship cali- 
bre by defeating the Muhlenberg bas- 
keteers, Lebanon Valley's Blue and 
White quintet reverted to its early season 
form and lost its last two encounters to 
close the season in a tie with the Ursinus 
Bears for last place in the Eastern Penn- 
sylvania College League. 

The Flying Dutchmen were defeated 
by Ursinus last week by a 51-40 count, 
never heading their opponents during the 
entire game. Albright's Lions took the 
Blue and White into camp in the finale 
last Saturday night on the Lebanon high 
floor, the score being 46 to 38. 

Albright stepped into the lead soon af- 
ter the opening whistle, shut out the Val- 
leyites from the field until a one-handed 
stab from the side of the floor by Patrizio 
parted the cords midway in the opening 
session, and assumed a 19-15 advantage 
at half time. 

The Albright lead was increased to 
25-17 in the opening minutes of the final 
canto before the Valleyites flashed their 
best offensive attack of the evening to 
register nine points in three minutes and 
sport a one-point lead on two field goals 
by Barthold, one each for Smith and 
Rust, and a foul conversion by Barthold. 

The Lions woke up at this point, how- 
ever, and wiped out the Valley, forging 
ahead, 29 to 26. A field goal by Bill 
Smith reduced the advantage to one 
point, but Woods came back with a twin- 
counter for Albright. Lebanon Valley 
went into the le id on field goal'-, by Bar- 
('•old and Snell. 

Once again the Valley stay in the van 
was short-lived, the Lions permanently 
ns-uming the lead on counters by Ross, 
Becker, and Woods. Barthold, Patrizio, 
and Smith kept L. V. C. in the running 
with field goals, bringing the score to 
42-38 with Albright leading and four 
minutes to play. Riffle counted two field 
goals in those closing minutes while the 
(Continued on Page 3, Column 1) 



Kalo - Delphian To 
Present Play In 
Joint Production 



DATE SET FOR APRIL 5 



'As Husbands Go" By Rachel 
Crothers Is the Perform- 
ance Scheduled 



"As Husbands Go" is the production 
Delphian and Kalo Literary Societies 
have chosen for their anniversary play. 
The play is to be presented Friday, 
April 5. 

The author of the play is Rachel Cro- 
thers, a practical theatre craftsman. She 
has been intimately connected with the 
commercial theatre since the production 
of her first play more ihan thirty years 
ago. The most popular of her plays are 
"Let Us Be Gay" and When Ladies 
Meet." 

Most of the cast are experienced Thes- 
pians of the campus. Lucille Lingard, 
played by Catherine Wagner, is the wife 
of a steady, thoroughly American middle 
westerner, Charles Lingard (Charles Kin- 
ney). Emmie Sykes, Lucille's friend with 
whom she has traveled to Europe, is 
played by Marietta Ossi. Ronnie, Wil- 
( Continued on Page 2, Column 3) 



Louise Gillan Heads 
Y.W.C.A. Organization 

Louise Gillan has been chosen to suc- 
ceed Lena Cockshott as president of the 
Young Woman's Christian Association. 
Miss Gillan has had much experience in 
"Y" work; she was an active member be- 
fore entering college and while here on 
the campus served as president of her 
freshman cabinet as well as vice-presi- 
dent of the senior cabinet during her third 
year. We may anticipate a successful 
administration under such a capable and 
energetic leader. 

With Miss Gillan to make up the cabi- 
net are Martha Faust as vice-president, 
Louise Shearer as corresponding secre- 
tary, and Rae Anna Reber as pianist. All 
of these have had previous experience on 
the cabinet. New workers are Romaine 
Stiles who will serve as recording secre- 
tary, Sarah Lupton, the new treasurer, 
and Christine Smith, the day students' 
representative. 

The new president has already appoint- 
ed her committee chairmen who are also 
(Continued on Page 2, Column 4) 



CONGRATS, BOB CASSEL 



The Y. M. C. A. also held its an- 
nual official elections in, which the fol- 
lowing men were elected: President, 
Robert Cassel; vice-president, Theo- 
dore Loose; secretary, Dean Gasteiger; 
and treasurer, Harold Beamesderfer. 

The new officials are to be) congrat- 
ulated upon attaining these positions 
on the campus, and everyone wishes 
them success in the carrying out of 
their duties in the year to follow. 



"Sophs" Crowned 
Interclass Champs 
In Playoff Battle 

SENIORS LOSE THEIR FINAL 



Flashy Extra-Period Attack Led 
By Homer Donmoyer Lands 
For Sophs 



The sophomores defeated the seniors 
in the inter-class play-off final Monday 
night in a furious extra-period battle to 
annex the class championship. 

The spectators who took in the battle 
on the college gym were treated to an 
exhibition of fast-moving, spirited basket- 
ball which far exceeded this year's var- 
sity encounters in thrills, speedy passing, 
and accurate shooting. 

At the end of the regulation game the 
score stood at 31 -all, necessitating; a five- 
minute extra period. Eighteen points 
were tallied during that extra session, the 
sophs accounting for 10 and the seniors 
for 8, the final tally reading 41-39 in 
favor of the second year men. 

Except for a brief period when the 

seniors missed a series of tap-in shots 

••pc; at r 
underneath their basket, play was ex- 
ceedingly brilliant in those five minutes. 
Shots that were started on their way to 
the basket were true to the mark. A 
high percentage of the shots attempted 
were successful, no matter whether they 
were long or short tries, from the side or 
the middle, one-handed or two-handed. 

Baugher racked up a twin-counter 
soon after play was begun in the extra 
session, but the seniors' advantage was 
almost immediately erased when Don- 
moyer sent a one-handed shot spinning 
through the hoop. Ax put the seniors 
out in front once again with a field goal, 
only to have Donmoyer knot the count 
with a neat side shot. The sophomores 
assumed a four-point lead on successive 
field goals by Loose and Donmoyer, but 
(Continued on Page 3, Column 3) 



College Orchestra 

Appears In Chapel 

The college orchestra, under the di- 
rection of Prof. Carmean, appeared in 
chapel on March 1. A very unusual pro- 
gram was presented. 

This little concert of the college or- 
rhestra consisted of two selections. The 
first number was the "Rosamunde Over- 
ture" by Franz Schubert. The second 
was "The Clock and Dresden Figure." 
This composition represents the dance of 
two Dresden China figures who jump 
from the mantelpiece in the middle of the 
night. They dance until the clock spring 
breaks, and then they rush back to their 
places before they will be discovered. 
The piano solo within this selection was 
played by Sara Light, the orchestra ac- 
companist. The remarks of the audience, 
as it left the chapel during the closing 
march, revealed that this was one of the 
most popular musical programs of the 
year. 



PAGE TWO 



LA VIE COLLEGIENNE THURSDAY, MARCH 14, 1935 



Administration Notes 



March 17— Dr. Lynch will preach 
at the Salem United Brethren in Christ 
Church, Baltimore, Md. 

March 22— The president will speak 
at the Harding Junior High School, 
Lebanon. 

March 24— Dr. Lynch will be in 
Philadelphia where he will preach in 
the morning at the Second U. B. 
Church, and in the evening at the 
First U. B. Church. 

March 25— Dr. Lynch will be the 
guest speaker at the Phila. Interde- 
nominational Ministerial Union at the 
Central Y. M. C. A. The subject of 
his speech will be "The Power of the 
Gospel in Modern Social Life." 



JLa Vtt (Lollegtenne 

ESTABLISHED 1925 

A weekly publication by the Under- 
graduate Students of Lebanon 
Valley College 



EDITORIAL STAFF 

Helen Earnest, '35 Editor-in-Chief 

George Hiltner, '35 Associate Editor 

Richard Baus, '37 -..Managing Editor 

David Yake, '36 Asst. Man. Editor 



REPORTORIAL STAFF 

Catherine Wagner, '35 
Sylvia Evelev, '36 
Louise Gillan, '36 
Lester Krone, '36 
Marian Leisey, 36 
Maxine Earley, '37 

Grace Naugle, '37 General Reporters 

Ida K. Hall, '35 ~ .....Conservatory 

William Earnest, '37 Athletics 

Miriam Eichner. "37 Alumni 

Louis Straub, '37 Philokosmian 

Charles Hauck, '35 ~ Kalozetean 

Jane Shellenberger, 36 Clionian 

Marietta Ossi, '35 — Delphian 



BUSINESS STAFF 

Kenneth Sheaffer, '35......Business Manager 

Albert Anderson, '36...Asst. Bus. Manager 

Robert Cassel, '36 Circulation Manager 

Elwood Needy, '37.... Asst. Cir. Manager 



Single Copies — 5 cents 

Subscription $100 per year 



Entered at the Annville, Pa., post 
office as second class matter, under the 
Act of March 3, 1879. 



THURSDAY, MARCH 14, 1935 



WHY MOTHERS' WEEK-END? 



The favorable results again obtained 
from a "Y" sponsored Mothers' Week- 
End show the increasing necessity for 
such an occasion. This policy— estab- 
lished but one year ago— is certainly go- 
ing to be an annual and long-continued 
one, if we can judge by the turnout of 
mothers who attended these former two 
sessions. 

In the first place there are so many 
parents who are not personally acquaint- 
ed with the college before the arrival of 
their children. Perhaps Lebanon Valley 
was chosen merely by catalogue or 
through the suggestion of a friend. This 
special week-end set aside for the enter- 
tainment of the mothers gives not only 
the student the opportunity to show off 
his or her school, but to introduce the 
parent to one's intimate friends, to the 
faculty members, and to make her gen- 
erally familiar with the college atmos- 
phere. In this way college friendships, 
living conditions, and faculty associations 
can be examined in their natural back- 
ground, and the parent can really see just 
how her beloved offspring is faring. 

This practise is also important in that 
it gives the mothers an opportunity to 
become acquainted with each other, and 
this helps to create a' friendly atmosphere 
throughout the student body. 

Along a lighter vein one may also add 
that Mothers' Week-End gave the entire 
student body a definite motivation to 
clean their rooms. Not that they are not 
always spic and span, far be it from me 
to suggest such an outrage, but a fond 
mother is apt to look under your carpet 
for dirt or run' an expectant finger over 
your picture ledges just eager to find 
some dust. The busy dusters and sweep- 
ers made an untiring effort to clean away 
all traces of any former yieldings to 
carelessness, and with tidy living quar- 
ters the students eagerly greeted their 
mothers. 

I close with but one regret, and that is 
my disappointment in the lack of a Fa- 
thers' Week-End to interest and awaken 
the enthusiasm of the proud father of a 
Lebanon Valley student. 



ALUMNI NOTES 



Edna Groff Diehl, a graduate of L. V. 
C. in piano in the class of 1900 and 
nationally known as a writer of children's 
story books, died last week in a Harris- 
burg hospital after an operation. Mrs. 
Diehl was active both in literary and mu- 
sical circles in Harrisburg, having writ- 
ten special feature stories for the news- 
papers, and being well known as a music 
critic and a talented pianist. Mrs. Diehl 
is best known, however, for her pleasing 
stories for small children, the most widely 
read being "The Little Dog That Would 
Not Wag Its Tail" and "The Little Kit- 
ten That Would Not Wash Its Face." 
She had written stories for nearly twenty- 
five years. 

Mrs. Diehl's father was Abraham L. 
Groff, a graduate of L. V. C. in 1879, 
and later a missionary in China. 



CONSERV NOTES 



This past week the Glee Club resumed 
activities in the concert field by giving a 
sacred program in Reading Salem U. B. 
Church on Thursday evening. Dale Roth, 
tenor, and Helen Summy, soprano, were 
the soloists. Two more concerts have 
been booked for this month— Lebanon on 
the 21st and Harrisburg on the 28th. 



A "new deal" has been inaugurated 
concerning Friday morning chapel— the 
seniors of the Conservatory will plan the 
programs for the next few weeks. Last 
Friday was the beginning of this "new 
deal" with a program arranged by Ida 
Katharine Hall. Hel^n Summy, our ever- 
popular soprano, sang "Yesterday and 
Today"— Spross, accompanied by Ruth 
Buck. Then a new team— Light and Pool 
—appeared in a piano-organ duo. They 
did "Grand Aria" by Damerest. This 
coming Friday Ethel Keller will have 
charge of the program. 

This past week a change in student 
teaching has been made. Hereafter all 
the seniors will have charge of the in- 
strumental classes in Hershey, while some 
of the juniors— Charlotte Stable}, Rae 
Anna Reber, Samuel Harnish, Nancy 
Bowman, Oleta Dietrich, Jack Schuler, 
Robert Sausser, and Lester Eshenour will 
have charge of the instrumental classes 
at Cornwall. 



The fourteenth meeting and festival of 
the Eastern Music Supervisors Confer- 
ence took. place this week at the William 
Penn hotel in Pittsburgh. Outstanding 
leaders in the music educational field lec- 
tured, such as: M. Claude Rosenberry, 
state director of music, Pennsylvania; 
Will Earhart, director of music, Pitts- 
burgh public schools; George L. Lindsay, 
director of music, Philadelphia public 
schools; Russell Carter, state supervisor 
of music, New York, etc. Miss Gillespie, 
Professor Carmean, and Ida Katharine 
Hall joined this "On-to-Pittsburgh Party" 
Monday morning. We expect to hear 
some interesting reports when they re- 
turn. 



The Conservatory prepared a splendid 
program for the mothers on Saturday af- 
ternoon. With this concert the girls' band 
inaugurated a campaign to raise funds for 
the purchase of uniforms. It is hoped to 
have them by Mothers' Week End 1936, 
if not before. 



There are 36,000 science journals being 
printed at the present time over the 
world. No one can keep abreast of the 
rapid advance. 



KALO-DELPHIAN TO 

GIVE JOINT PLAY 



(Continued from Page One) 



bur Leech, and Hippolotus Lomi, Charles 
Hauck, are gigolos who are attracted to 
the two American women's money. They 
follow the women to America and .ilmost 
ruin the happy home of the Lingards. 
Peggy, Emma Mary Smyser, is the 
daughter of Emmie Sykes. She ridicules 
her mother's newly-acquired continental 
culture. The European men who came 
home with the American women afford 
a contrast to the typically American men, 
Jake, Paul Hershey, and Charles, Charles 
Kinney. David Byerly interprets the part 
of Wilbur, the twelve year-old nephew 
of Charles Lingard. 

Greta Heiland and Claire Adams are 
the two maids, Katie and Christine. Duey 
linger and Dick Huber are the waiters in 
the cafe in Paris. 

The play is a three-act one with a pro- 
logue which is laid in Paris. The three 
acts are in the Lingard s home in Dubu- 
que, Iowa. The play is well-balanced 
and neatly constructed. The two most 
important characteristics of the produc- 
tion are its skillful characterization and 
capital dialogue. These points distin- 
guish all Miss Crother's plays. There are 
frequent jabs of satire which add rather 
than destroy the mellow comedy. It is 
not a profound play, but an excellent ex- 
ample of the American comedy of do- 
mestic realism. 

The play is known to many on the 
campus, having been the moving picture 
which was produced for the Delphian 
benefit show last year. 

Both societies wish to thank Dr. Stru- 
ble and Dr. Stonecipher for their gener- 
ous services in coaching the production. 



LOUISE GILLAN HEADS 
Y.W.C.A. ORGANIZATION 



(Contiuued from Page One) 



cabinet members. These include Irma 
Keifer, the program chairman; Grace 
Naugle, social chairman; Iva Claire Wei- 
rick, devotional chairman; and world fel- 
lowship chairman, Maxine Earley. 

Mrs. Lynch, Mrs. Wallace, and Miss 
Myers will act as advisers to the newly- 
formed organization. 



Duke university 

SCHOOL OF MEDICINE 

DURHAM. N. C. 

Four terms of eleven weeks are given 
each year. These may be taken con- 
secutively < graduation in three years) 
or th'-ee terms may be taken each year 
(graduation in four years). The en- 
trance requirement's are intelligence, 
character and at least two years of 
college work, including the subjects 
srecified for Grade A Medical Schools. 
Catalogues and application forms may 
be obtained from the Dean. 



SAINT JOHNSBURY ACADEMY 

Saint Johnsbury, Vermont 

An Old New England Academy in an Old New England Town. Thorough 
preparation for college. Commercial courses. Dormitories for boys and girls. 
Tuition $550 covers all expenses. Scholarship aid for worthy boys and girls. 
WRITE PRINCIPAL STANLEY R. OLDHAM, L. V. C. 08 



goodbye 
to all that ! 

Have you ever been too busy to 
write home? Have you ever 
wracked your brains for some- 
thing worth writing about ? 

It need never happen again ! Tele- 
phone instead and let the family 
do the talking. It saves time, costs 
little and exactly fills the bill! 

• Call 100 wiles for 60 ct>nts by 
Day Rate; for 50 cents by 
Evening Rate; for 35 cents by 
Night Rate. (Station to Station 
calls — 3-minute connections.) 



The Bell Telephone Company of Pennsylvania 



No. 23 



» 



LA VIE COLLEGIENNE THURSDAY, MARCH 14, 1935 



PAGE THREE 



DRIBBLERS LOSE TWO; 

FINISH IN LOOP CELLAR 



(Continued from Page One) 



Flying Dutchmen were held scorrless to 
bring the final tally to 46-38. 

In the preliminary game last Saturday 
night the Albright Freshmen defeated the 
L. V. C. Frosh, 30 to 25, in a rather 
drab and uninteresting contes'.. The Blue 
and White yearlings converted only 1 1 
cf 24 foul tries, but strangely enough a 
series of three straight charity tosses by 
Kroske enabled the Valleyites to threaten 
their opponents for the only time during 
the game. The three conversions by the 
lanky guard cut the Albright lead to 23- 
22, but the Lion Cubs rallied and stepped 
into a comfortable lead, coasting through 
to victory. Summaries: 

URSINUS 

Johnson, f 

Calvert, f 2 

Hieges, f 

Bauer, f 

Grenawalt, c 3 

Costello, g 3 

Fisher, g 1 

Covert, g 4 

Totals 

LEBANON VALLEY 



G. 


F. 


T. 


10 


2 


22 


2 





4 





1 


1 





1 


1 


3 





6 


3 





6 


1 





2 


4 


1 


9 


23 


5 


51 



G. 


F. 


T. 


4 


4 


12 


2 


4 


8 


4 


2 


10 











2 


2 


6 


2 





4 


14 


12 


40 



ALBRIGHT 

G. T. 

Ross, f 2 1 5 

Becker, f 5 10 

Shipe, c 4 3 11 

Woods, g 5 4 H 

Riffle, g 3 6 

Totals 19 8 46 



Dr. Lynch Discusses 
True Meaning of Lent 

A Y. M. C. A. vesper service was 
held in the "Y" room of the men's 
dormitory last Sunday evening after 
supper, with a large crowd in attend- 
ance. Elwood Needy, the devotional 
chairman of the Y. M. C. A., assumed 
charge of the service which he had 
arranged. Homer Kendall, after pre- 
senting a Scripture lesson taken from 
the Book of Proverbs, led the group 
in prayer. A quartette consisting of 
Roth, Hiltner, Krone, and Sausser 
rendered a very appropriate vocal se- 
lection. Dr. Clyde A. Lynch, presi- 
dent of Lebanon Valley College, then 
delivered the address of the evening, 
in which he stressed the true meaning 
of Lent. 



LEBANON VALLEY 

G. F. T. 

Rust, f 2 2 6 

Barthold, f 6 2 14 

Billett, f 

Smith, c 4 1.9 

Patrizio, g 3 6 

Snell, g 1 1 3 

Totals 16 6 38 

ALBRIGHT FRESHMEN 

G. F. T. 

Slingerland, f 4 

McCormack, f 

Zuke, f ; : 

Knox, c 6 5 17 

Oslislo, g 

Walters, g 

Disend, g 2 1 5 

Totals 12 6 30 

LEBANON VALLEY FRESHMEN 

G. F. T. 

Billett, f 4 1 9 

Tindall, f 1 2 4 

Aungst, c 11 

Kroske, c-g 1 3 5 

Rozman, g 14 6 

Klipa, g 

Seaks, c-g 

Totals 7 11 25 



"SOPHS" CROWNED 

INTERCLASS CHAMPS 



(Continued from Page One) 



the seniors retaliated with four counters 
on two foul tosses by Baugher and a field 
goal by Ax. Donmoyer scored the final 
points of the game on another accurate 
one-handed flip, the game ending soon 
afterward with the sophs on the long end 
of a 41-39 count. 

The starting sophomore quintet com- 
pletely outplayed the seniors in the early 
stages of the game to assume a 20-12 
lead at half-time. The removal of Heisch 
and Flocken later in the encounter seemed 
to weaken the soph attack and the seniors 
rallied to tie the count, only to be sub- 
dued by the fighting second-year men in 
the extra five minutes of play. 

Homer Donmoyer starred for the vic- 
tors with 26 counters, eight of them reg- 
istered in that crucial extra period. Ax 
and Arndt led the seniors with 12 and 11 
points respectively. The remainder of the 
points for each team were evenly distri- 
buted, practically every player breaking 
into the scoring. 

The seniors were awarded twenty foul 
tries, successfully converting 11, while 
the sophs were able to capitalize on 5 of 
their 1 1 attempts. This margin in foul 
tossing kept the seniors in the lunning 
for they were outclassed 18 to 14 in field 
goals by the soph sharpshooters. 

The seniors had entered the final by 
virtue of a 26-17 win over the frosh last 
week, the sophs having drawn a bye to 
novo straight to the finals. Summaries: 
SOPHOMORES 

G. 

Donmoyer, f 11 

Flocken, f 1 

Heisch, c-g 1 

Lazin, c 

Bachman, g 2 

Loose, g 2 

Straub, g-f 1 



F. 
4 



1 





T. 

26 
2 
2 

5 
4 
2 



Totals 



.11 



G. 

Arndt, f 4 



F. 
3 



41 

T. 
11 



Ax, f-g 4 4 12 

Lloyd, f 2 1 5 

Kanoff, f 2 4 ! 

Sincavage, c 11 

Baugher, g-c 2 2 6 

Shroyer, g 

Totals 14 11 39 

Seniors 5 14 8—39 

Sophs 11 9 2 9 10-41 

SENIORS 

G. F. T. 

Arndt, f 

Boran, f 2 4 

Kanoff, f ,. 

Lloyd, f 

Sincavage, c 3 1 7 

Baugher, c-g 2 1 5 

Ax, g 5 10 

Shroyer, g 

Koch, g 



Totals 12 

FRESHMEN 

G. 

Long, f 4 

Keiper, f 

Frey, c 1 

Spitler, c 

Capka, g 2 

Davies, g 

Seniors 6 2 4 

Freshmen 3 5 7 



26 



F. 
1 





1 
1 



9 

2 

5 
1 

14-26 
2-17 



EASTERN PENNSYLVANIA 
COLLEGE LEAGUE 



Wednesday, March 6 
Gettysburg 62; Albright 26. 
Ursinus 51; Lebanon Valley 40. 

Friday, March 8 
Gettysburg 32; F. and M. 21. 

Saturday, March 9 
Albright 46; Lebanon Valley 38. 



Final Standing of the Teams 

W. L. Pet. 

Gettysburg 11 1 ,917 

Muhlenberg 9 3 .750 

F. and M 7 4 .636 

Drexel 4 7 ,364 

Albright 3 7 .300 

Lebanon Valley 3 9 .250 

Ursinus 3 9 .250 



DRAMA APPRECIATION 



. NOW I WILL GIVE YOU A |p 
LTASTY BIT OF ROMEO AND ^ 
k JULIET IN TRULY DRAMATIC 
STYLE !j T 




TOBACCO APPRECIATION 




IT 15 MY LADY ; O, IT IS MYl 
LOVE ! 0, THAT SHE KNEW 
SHE WERE! SHE SPEAKS, 
YET 5HE SAYS NOTHING. | 
WHAT OF THAT? HER EYE 
DISCOURSES. I WILL^ 
ANSWER IT.^ •—■f^ 




WOULD I WERE SLEEP AND 
PEACE, 50 SWEET TO REST, 
HENCE WILL I TO MY 
GHOSTLY FATHER'S 

HIS HELP---, 




PRINCE ALBERT IS MILD 
AND MELLOW ! " 

"TWO OUNCES IN EVERY TIN' 

"IT'S CRIMP CUT- 
LASTS MUCH LONGER" 

•eft 




Copyright, HW5. K. J Reynolds Tobacco Company. Winston-Salem. N. C. 

"THE WORLD'S FAVORITE 

PIPE SMOKE r 
"NEVER BITES THE TONGUE" 
"JUST TOP-QUALITY TOBACCO" 




THE NATIONAL 

JOY SMOKE! 



PAGE FOUR 



LA VIE COLLEGIENNE THURSDAY, MARCH 14, 1935 



^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^ N,^ 


M m m m m m ! 
BREAKFAST 
Toasted Raisin Bread 




and 


Coffee 


THE 


PENNWAY 



Campus Cuts 

Who said that everything exciting 
happens in big places? We've heard 
plenty of mysterious stories in the last 
few weeks, and the other night a certain 
couple from right out of our midst got 
all the thrills they care to have for the 
rest of the walks they take this year. The 
scene was down by the Quittie where 
couples can be found strolling 'most any 
night. Suddenly, from behind a barn 
loomed a black figure before our heroine 
and hero, and something from under a 
dark coat and pulled-down hat ordered 
them to put their hands up. It has been 
revealed that the girl was especially 
frightened because she had a dollar bill 
with her. We don't know whether or not 
the young man was worth anything, but 
he did decide right then and there to take 
a sock at the villain. He was stopped 
just in time by a familiar laugh. The 
joke was too much for Billett, the thug, 
and he had to laugh. Maybe fate was 
with you, though, "Bil." A sock from a 
football man in defense of his lady love 
might not have been so pleasant. 



SEMINAR AT READING 



A rainy day isn't the best thing to 
wake up and find after a week's campus 
^and a man-campus at that. Just ask 
Isabella. Anyway, the weather did clear 
that night, and was she happy! Better 
luck next time, Izzy. We'd like to see 
the cheerful dispositions most fellows 
would have after a week's confinement 
on campus. 



Anybody who walks too close to a 
frosh girl this week is likely to come 
away with a black eye. Those coat hang- 
ers look vicious! Careful, girls, don't toss 
your heads unless no one is within three 
feet of you. 



The girls used their mothers as a good 
excuse to invade the boys' dorm Satur- 
day afternoon. The boys made charming 
hosts, indeed, and very graciously dis- 
played their rooms and the "Y" rooms. 
Probably the girls appreciated the ex- 
perience more than their mothers did, for 
more than one mother definitely stated 
that she preferred the girls' dorm. 



All his faults are such that one loves 
him still the better for them. 

—Goldsmith 



DANIEL SHEARER 

ADDRESSES GROUP 



The regular student mid-week pray- 
er service was conducted Wednesday 
night, March 6, with Homer "KenHall 
in charge. The service opened with a 
prelude presented by Ruth Goyne at 
the piano. Bruce Metzger, after read- 
ing some selections from the writings 
of King Solomon, led in a prayer. Mr. 
Kendall then presented the speaker of 
the evening, Daniel Shearer, who de 
livered a short talk on the question "Is 
Life a Lottery?" 



Five Lebanon Valley representa- 
tives traveled to Albright Tuesday, 
March 12, to attend a joint Y. M. 
and Y. W. C. A. seminar from four 
to ten o'clock. The speaker for the 
occasion was Kirby Page, a well- 
known lecturer. Dr. R. R. Butterwick 
took the following students to this 
session: 

Lena Cockshott, Grace Naugle, 
Maxine Earley, Alma Cline, and Iva 
Claire Weirick. 



laughed 'cause they didn't know little 
Audrey could read. 

Now this time little Audrey was out 
for an adventure so up she went to the 
attic. When she had explored all the 
trunks and boxes she came to an old 
dirty window where the hinges were all 
rusty. She gave it one good shove, and 
what do you think happened? Well, 
poor little Audrey fell down on the pave- 
ment below and killed herself dead. 

When her mother and father came up 
and found out what had happened they 
laughed and laughed and laughed 'cause 
they didn't know that the window would 
open. 



GREEN BLOTTER BLOTS 



DERANGEE 
"Laugh! Laugh! It is funny!" "Is it?" 
I see no fun; I see no sky 
Nor clouds which go a-whirling by, 
For me no sunshine; just the rain 
Until my love comes back again. 
You see a bird; you hear his song. 
I hear it fall; I see the wrong— 
A sun that scorches; winds that burn 
While down my own dry throat I yearn 
To taste the spring, to feel it cool 
My own reflection in the pool. 
And still you say, "Laugh! Laugh! Be 
gay! 

How could you be another way?" 
PLUS DERANGEE 

Tired 
I was 

To-night, my dear, 

Ready to fall at your feet. 

Sick at heart I was 

But you did not know— 

I did not tell you my heart was singing. 

There was something I wanted to say 

So much that I could not. 

After I had gone, I came back 

With courage enough to— 

Ask it 

You were not there. 
Perhaps I shall tell you 
One day, 

And tho' you do not know it now, 
F shall have mv way. 



Who says modern songs aren't appro- 
priate? 

"College Rhythm"— Jinny and Jack. 

"Mood Indigo"— Palatini. 

"Love Is Just Around the Corner"— 
Boyd Shaffer. 

"Let's Fall in Love"— Bunny and - - ? 

"The Man on the Flying Trapeze"— 
Frank Boran. 

"Mr. and Mrs. is the Name"— Kohler 
and Gongloff. 

"Solitude"— Gordon Davies. 

"When Lights Are Low"— Betty and 
Jake. 

"Just a Gigolo"— Sheese. 
"The Object of My Affection"— Roz 
man. 

"Take a Number from One to Ten"— 
Martha Baney. 

"Crazy People"— Kotty and Sarge. 

"Over the Week-end"— Rose Dieter. 

"I Got An Invitation to a Dance"— 
Martha Shriner. 

"Parking in the Moonlight"— Kathleen 
and Bill. 

"Flirtation Walk"— Kreider's. 

"I Love You Truly"— All L. V. C. 



The only way to get rid of a tempta- 
tion is to yield to it.— Oscar Wilde. 



The Logical Place for L. V. C. 
Students to Buy 

BOOKS & SUPPLIES 
ESBENSHADE'S 

38 N. 8th St., Lebanon, Pa. 




Now little Audrey was only three 
years old, and one night her mother and 
father went out and left her all alone. 
Poor little Audrey, there she sat with 
time on her hands (you see she was 
holding a wrist watch). 

After a long period of contemplation 
little Audrey decided that she would like 
to make some fudge to pass the time 
away. She hunted and hunted. (This 
was during the early part of the season) , 
and finally she found the cook book. 

She read the book, and it said set on 
the stove until comes to a boil— so poor 
little Audrey sat down on the stove and 
burned to a frizzle. 

When her mother and father came 
home they laughed and laughed and 



KREAMER BROS. 



Leonard Elec. Refrigerators 
Hoover Electric Sweepers 
Easy Electric Washers 
Gas and Coal Stoves 
Rugs and Linoleums 



Furniture - - Undertaking 



Phone 144 



ANNVILLE, PA. 



TOILET ARTICLES 

PATENT MEDICINES 
CIGARS - CIGARETTES 

ANDREW'S 
CUT RATE STORE 

OPPOSITE COURT HOUSE 

8th & cumberland sts. 

Lebanon, Pa. 
VISIT OUR FOUNTAIN 



Goodman Brothers 

SODA FOUNTAIN 



'Always Reliable" 




For Recreation, Try 

ROEMIG'S 

BILLIARDS and BOWLING 



FOR QUALITY 

Baked Products 

PATRONIZE 

FINK'S BAKERY 

MAIN STREET 



D. L. Saylor & Sons 
CONTRACTORS 

LUMBER and COAL 
Annville, Pennsylvania 



Van Heusen Shirts 

'Cut Right . . . Fit Right' 
New Assortment of Spring 

NECKWEAR 
John Hirsh Dep't Store 



CLOTHING OF QUALITY 

J. S. BASHORE 



PRINTIN&^flNDINC CO 

WEB£ATT/f£ WORLD ON RUS/f ORDERS 
MAKE US PROVE /T 

LEBANON 740 WALTON 520 WASHINGTON READING 



Attend 
Clionian 
Benefit 



VOL. XI 

Fathers' Week-End 
Proposed By "Y" 

NEW PLANS DISCUSSED 

Professor Gingrich To Be Guest 
Speaker At Vespers On 
Sunday 



LEBANON VALLEY COLLEGE 

ANNVILLE, PENNSYLVANIA, THURSDAY^ MARCH 21 1»as 




The regular Y. M. C. A. vespers serv 
ice was held in the men's dormitory last 
Sunday evening. Warren Mentzer, who 
has just completed a year of faithful and 
honorable service as president of the Y 
M. C. A. on this campus, had change of 
the devotions. Dr. W. A. Wilt, pastor 
of the college church, presented the mess 
age of the evening, choosing as his sub 
ject "The Stream of Mental Develop- 
ment," in which he outlined the various 
factors that enter into the man-making 
process. Dr. Wilt has shown himself to 
be vitally interested in the young men of 
this college, and they in turn consider this 
interest to be a valuable asset to their 
organization 

The Y. M. C. A. intends to make these 
Sunday vespers services worth-while and 
inspiring, and for that purpose have se- 
lected capable speakers. On March 10 
Dr. Lynch brought the message at the 
vespers service; on March 17 Dr. Wilt 
was engaged to speak; for next Sunday 
evening Professor Gingrich has agreed 
to present a talk; and on the evening of 
March 31 Dr. Klein, the president of Al 
bright College, will deliver an address 
t0 the local Y. M. C. A. 

Robert Cassel, president of the new 
cabinet, is desirous of making these serv 
ices outstanding in interest and appeal 
|imong the various activities of the col- 
e 9e, and with his corps of able associ- 
ates is planning for future events. The 
Project under consideration at the present 
'"^ e is a proposed fathers' week-end, 
, er > the fathers of male scudent's will be 
! nvite d to come to Lebanon Valley Col 



k as guests with provisions furnished 
° r their accommodation and comfort. 



Tea For Frosh Class 
At Dr. Lynch's Home 

f I - )r - and Mrs. Lynch entertained the 
^shmen class with a delightful tea 



w eek at their home. Mrs. Ben- 



and Miss Ward presided over the 
^ table, while Charlotte Stabley, Ir- 
^ a KcifFer, Helen Summy, and Rae 
Reber of the junior class served. 
p re ° £t Pl easin 9 entertainment was 
by i> nted in tJie * orm °* 3 cornet ^ uet 

Stabl 6 Anna Reber and Cnarlotte 
S ta ^ ey ' vocal numbers by Charlotte 

a CcQ ey an d Helen Summy, who were 

5j s ^ Pnn >ed on the violin by Martha 

P 0ol ' and on the piano by Kathleen 

The 1 

r at e( j ° mc was appropriately deco- 
tn en In 9reen in honor of the fresh* 
s^ nd St. Patrick's Day. 



Clionian Society 

To Sponsor Movie 

The Clionian Literary Society is spon- 
soring a movie "The Lives of a Bengal 
Lancer" to be shown next week at the 
Astor theatre. The society could scarcely 
have chosen a better movie to present to 
its patrons. With its opening a few 
months ago critics unanimously acciaimed 
"The Lives of a Benq?! Lancer" with 
all the adjectives at their command. 

Certainly this is a stupendous picture: 
its production has been spread out over 
four years; four thousand actors per- 
formed in it at one time or another; and 

(Continued on Page 2, Column 4) 



No. 23 



LA VIE COLLEGIENNE TO 
HAIL TENTHBIR THDA Y 

ALBRIGHT VICTORY RECORDED 

Society Events Earn Prominent Place In Early Editions Name 
Of Newspaper Explained, Debates and Joint Sessions De- 
scribed, Outstanding Musical Programs Outlined. 



By GEORGE J. HILTNER 



Girl Debaters Win 
Against Penn State 

PHILIPS IS CRITIC JUDGE 



Other Debates With Albright 
And Elizabethtown Not As 
Successful 



One of the best of the debates which 
have been held on this campus in the 
last few years resulted in a very well- 
deserved victory for Lebanon Valley Col- 
lege over the Penn State girls' debating 
team. Miss Helen Chamberlin and Miss 
lean Wittle of Penn State upheld the af- 
firmative side of the munitions guestion 
in opposition to Miss Louise Gillan and 
Miss Marion Leisey, the Lebanon Valley 
negative team. All four constructive 
speeches were excellent. During the 
speeches and the rebuttals the audience 
showed a great deal of interest in the 
clever means used by both sides to bring 
out their strong points. The natural man- 
ner of both teams was quite effective. 

At the end of the debate, the chair- 
man, Professor Stokes, introduced the 
critic judge, Mr. E. M. Philips of Her- 
shey, a graduate of Franklin and Mar- 
shall College and a former student in the 
graduate school of North Carolina Uni- 
versity. Mr. Philips termed ..he debate 
an argument between idealist and realist 
and criticized the affirmative on three par- 
ticular points. He considered that they 
had been too general in their evidence, 
probably because of the idealistic point 
of view, that they had not included 
enough in their definition of mutations, 
and that they had not been convincing 
nough in their arguments for govern- 
Continued on Page 3 Column 2) 



Tracing back through the history of 
the La Vie Collegienne, we find that ap- 
proximately ten years take us back to the 
accounts of what the student was doing 
for scholastic and social amelioration as 
recorded by the initial number of the 
present Lebanon Valley weekly. 

The La Vie made its entrance with a 
blaze of enthusiasm, for the first item 
which arrests our attention by reason of 
the fact that it stands out in bold head- 
lines is the one announcing that Lebanon 
Valley had defeated Albright 41-0! Gel- 
bdt, Singley, and Piersol, leading an 
outweighed but invincible eleven, are the 
outstanding stars, aiding to crush the 
Lions with a deadly aerial attack that 
completed 18 out of 20 passes. 

Another feature of the first La Vie 
tells of Clio's 55th anniversary celebra- 
tion, at which time the co-eds capably 



Hedgerow Players 
Give Modern Play 

"BEYOND THE HORIZON" 



Jasper Deeter Again Takes 
Prominent Role and Directs 
Cast 



"Y" Cabinet Members 
Installed At Chapel 



Another milestone was reached last 
week in the calendar of L. V. C. when 
the newly-elected officers for the Y, W. 
C. A. and Y. M. C. A. cabinets were 
installed. 

With the impressive ceremony that 
traditionally accompanies the election of 
these officers, Louise Gillan as Y. W. C. 
(Continued on Page 4, Column 2) 



All Lebanon Valley students who en- 
joyed the Hedgerow Players' presenta- 
tion of "The Inheritors" on the college 
campus, will have the opportunity to see 
another play by this famous group of 
actors. The Hedgerow Players are being 
brought to Lebanon by the City Teach- 
ers' Association. In the Lebanon High 
School auditorium on Monday, April 1, 
will be presented Eugene O'Neill's fa- 
mous play, "Beyond the Horizon." 

Eugene O'Neill is praised as the only 
American dramatist of the present genera- 
tion with an international reputation. 
"Beyond the Horizon" grew out of an 
experience of O'Neill's on a British tramp 
steamer where he met a Norwegian sail- 
or who expressed regret that he had not 
remained on the farm. At its first ap- 
pearance, "Beyond the Horizon" was 
hailed as the "first great tragedy that has 
been contributed to the drama of the 
world by a native American." It en- 
joyed a very successful run in New York 
City and at the end of the year was 
awarded the Pulitzer Prize. 

The play is the tragedy of Robert 
Mayo, a dreamy, imaginative youth, at- 
( Continued on Page 3, Column 3) 



presented "Classic Lore in Other Days" 
in ballad, epic, pastoral, song, and dance. 
The choruses were under the direction of 
Miss Ruth Engle, of the conservatory, 
and H. H. Shenk rendered valuable serv- 
ice in securing information on folk-lore. 
The stage was attractively set as an out- 
door scene. The characters included Rob- 
in Hood, played by Sara Weider, and 
Nelda Spatz, Mary G. Kreider, Mabel 
Hafer, Olga Freeman, and Mabel Bru- 
baker as members of his band. Some 
lovely Scotch ballads revealed Marion 
Hess as an able performer, while in the 
clog dance were included such lightfoot 
artist as Esther Shenk. Other dancers 
were Alice Kindt, Esther Walmer, Nellie 
G. Rabenstine, Marion Corle, Carrie 
Early, Lottie Snavely, and Jennie Shoop. 

Still on the first page we find an im- 
portant announcement stating that Mrs. 
Mary Green has been appointed to the 
responsible position of secretary of the 
Association of Dean of Women of Penn- 
sylvania colleges at a meeting held in the 
Penn Harris hotel at Harrisburg, Pa. 
Governor Pinchot and Dr. Francis Haas, 
state superintendent of Public Instruc- 
tions, were among the speakers who ad- 
dressed the conference. 

Turning over to the inside pages, we 
find first of all an interesting note on why 
the new publication is called La Vie Col- 
legienne, a French phrase meaning Col- 
lege Life. There are two reasons enu- 
merated: first, because as a college paper 
it expected to chronicle the college life 
of Lebanon Valley students, and second- 
( Continued on Page 4, Column 2) 



Cockshott Speaks 

At Friendly Hour 

The new Y. W. C. A. cabinet in- 
augurated its first Friendly Hour serv 
ice last Sunday, March 17. 

The meeting opened with a hymn 
after which the devotions were con- 
ducted by Mary Haddox. Rae Anna 
Reber, the new pianist, displayed her 
talent in a delightful piano solo. Fol- 
lowing this, an inspirational message, 
The True Meaning of Lent," was 
presented by Lena Cockshott. An- 
other special number in the form of a 
vocal solo by Helen Summy featured 
the next part of the program. 

With the singing of another hymn 
the meeting was adjourned. 



PAGE TWO 



LA VIE COLLEGIENNE, THURS DAY, MARCH 21, 1935 



Ha Viz (Lollegienne 



ESTABLISHED 1925 



A weekly publication by the Under- 
graduate Students of Lebanon 
Valley College 

EDITORIAL STAFF 

Helen Earnest, '35„.„ Editor-in-Chief 

George Hiltner, '35 — Associate Editor 

Richard Baus, '37 Managing Editor 

David Yake, '36 Asst. Man. Editor 



REPORTORIAL STAFF 

Catherine Wagner, '35 
Sylvia Evelev, '36 
Louise Gillan, '36 
Lester Krone, '36 
Marian Leisey, 36 
Maxlne Earley, '37 

Grace Naugle, '37 General Reporters 

Ida K. Hall, '35 „ Conservatory 

William Earnest, '37 Athletics 

Miriam Eichner, '37 Alumni 

Louis Straub, '37 Philokosmian 

Charles Hauck, '35 Kalozetean 

Jane Shellenberger, 36 „....Clionian 

Marietta Ossi, '35 Delphian 

BUSINESS STAFF 

Kenneth Sheaffer, '35 Business Manager 

Albert Anderson, '36...Asst. Bus. Manager 

Robert Cassel, '36 Circulation Manager 

Elwood Needy, '37.... Asst. Cir. Manager 



Single Copies- 
Subscription 



5 cents 

..$1.00 per year 



Entered at the Annville, Pa., post 
office as second class matter, under the 
Act of March 3, 1879. 



THURSDAY, MARCH 21, 1935 



SPRING AND THE LAST LAP 



The year's at the spring 
And day's at the morn; 
Morning's at seven; 
The hillside's dew-pearled; 
The lark's on the wing; 
The snail's on the thorn; 
God's in His heaven- 
All's right with the world! 

What could be a more appropriate 
topic on this day of days when the buds 
blossom forth, the birds begin their carols, 
and the grass assumes a summer green- 
ness than the subject of Spring, the sea- 
son of renewed promises, rejuvenated 
hopes, and the final lap of the college 
year? 

What does Spring mean to our college 
campus? Oh, yes, we have all heard that 
interesting phrase, "In Spring when a 
young man's fancy turns to thoughts of 
love," and according to all present indi- 
cations this will be a banner year at 
Lebanon Valley. But beyond this ob- 
servation, what special activities mark 
this glorious season? Social activities 
now assume a freshened appearance. The 
Senior Ball, Kalo Week-End, Philo An- 
niversary, the society plays, May Day, 
with a culmination in the Junior Prom 
fill the program for the interested parti- 
cipants. Summer wardrobes make their 
debut— white shoes, thin frocks, and sum- 
mer suits join in marking Spring as a dis- 
tinctive and important season. 

To the college student this time of the 
year brings with it an annual touch of 
that fearful and incurable malady — spring 
fever— a dreaded disease with its unes- 
capable grip. The consequences of this 
lethargy may be disastrous, for it may 
mean a complete let down in class prepa- 
ration. On this first day of Spring let us 
hereby resolve to buckle down to some 
honest study in order to finish this semes- 
ter in a credible fashion. Many of us are 
seniors, and these last few weeks will 
mean our last at this institution. We 
should think enough of our previous re- 
cords and grades to maintain a high 
standard for this, our last attempc. 



TRIO IN JOINT RECITAL 



Barrere-Salzedo-Britt were heard in a 
joint recital for flute, harp and 'cello in 
Lebanon this past Tuesday evening. This 
is the last of the community concerts to 
be given in Lebanon this season. The 
program: 

Sonata Antonio Lotti 

Largo-Allegro Adagio-Coda 
Barrere-Salzedo-Britt 

Trio Boris Koutzen 

Allegro molto Adagio Allegro Scher- 
zando-Coda 

Barrere-Salzedo-Britt 
Adagio and Allegro, from Sonata No. 6, 

in A Major Louigi Boccherini 

Horace Britt 
Carlos Salzedo at the piano 

Duet No. 3, in B flat major 

Ludwig van Beethoven 
Allegro sostenuto Aria con varia- 
zioni 

Georges Barrere and Horace Britt 
Sonata in C minor.. ..Giovanni B. Pescetti 
Allegro vigoroso Andante espres- 
sivo Presto 

Three Short Stories in Music 

Carlos Salzedo 
Pirouetting Music Box Gold-fish 
Skipping Rope 

Carlos Salzedo 

Airs de Ballet from "Ascanio" 

Camille Saint-Saens 

Fantaisie Gabriel Faure 

Georges Barrere 
Carlos Salzedo at the piano 

Sonata da Camera Gabriel Pierne 

Prelude Sarabande Finale 
Barrere-Salzedo-Britt 



LIBRARY NOTES 



Many valuable books have just been 
presented to the library, among which 
was "The Rise and Destiny of the Ger- 
man Jew" by Jacob R Marcus,, donated 
by Rabbi A. L. Davidson of Lebanon. 
In addition is an extensive collection of 
Dr. H. R. Howard, a native of Portland, 
Maine. Dr. Howard was a clergyman of 
the Episcopal Church who served parish- 
es in New York State and Tennessee. 
After his death, his widow brought the 
library, which consists of 284 volumes, 
to Manheim, Pa. Mrs. Howard died a 
little more than a year ago at the home 
of Mr. U. S. Blecher, near Annville. In- 
cluded in this library are: "Complete 
Works of Maria Edgeworth," the "Amer- 
ican Almanac," the "Works of Plato" 
translated by Burges, the "Military Jour- 
nal of the American Revolution" (1775- 
83), and "Curiosities of Literature" by 
Benjamin Disraeli. The Lebanon Valley 
College library is very grateful for these 
valuable contributions. 



C. W. FETTER ADDRESSES 
WEEKLY PRAYER GROUP 



The regular weekly student prayer 
service was held last Wednesday 
night in Philo Hall. Irma Keiffer, a 
student in the Conservatory of Music, 
played a very appropriate piano pre- 
lude, after which she assumed charge 
of the devotional part of the service. 
Charlotte Stabley, also a music stu- 
dent, rendered a beautiful contralto 
solo entitled "Let Not Your Heart Be 
Troubled." The speaker of the eve- 
ning, Mr. C. Willard Fetter, a senior 
who transferred to L. V. C. from 
Wheaton College last fall, then de- 
livered a very inspiring address on 
the topic "Knowing Him." 



ANNOUNCEMENT! 



Please pay all pledges of the World 
Friendship Project to the chairmen of 
the committee before April 6. 

Signed, 
Martha Faust, 

Y.W.C.A. 

Harold Beamesderfer, 

Y.M.C.A. 



CONSERV NOTES 



March 21— Glee Club, Lebanon. 

March 25— Girls' Band, Palmyra Auto 
Club, Chapel, Prof. Carmean, conductor. 

March 25— Boys' Band, Chambersburg, 
Prof. Rutledge, conductor. 

Mr.rch 28— Glee Club, Harrisburg. 

March 28— Reading Madrigal Society, 
Willy Richter, director, Orpheum theatre, 
8:15 P.M. Gertrude Sternbergh, guest 
artiste. 



There were many unusual features at 
the Eastern Music Supervisors Confer- 
ence. The exhibits and the A Cappella 
choirs were the most outstanding. One 
full day was devoted to observing in the 
elementary and junior-senior high schools 
—the creative work and the singing class-j 
es were very interesting. The Columbia 
luncheon, the banquet for the entire con- 
ference, and the Intercollegiate Glee Club 
contest were the high lights of the con- 
vention. The theme of all the lectures 
and demonstrations was the growth of 
music in the public schools. 



Miss Ethel Keller was in charge of the 
chapel program March 15. Two clever 
artists appeared on this program: Stuart 
Goodman who sang "Passing By," Pur- 
cell, and "Invictus," Hahn; and Ruth Bai- 
ley who did two piano solos, "Allegro 
Barbara," Bartok, and "Devilish Inspira- 
tion," Prokofieff. This week the program 
will be in charge of Ernest Koch. 



A recital will be given in the conserv- 
atory Tuesday evening at 8 o'clock. 
Those appearing on this program are: 
Helen Summy, voice; Jane Showers, or- 
gan; the string quartet consisting of Jack 
Schuler, Robert Sausser, Russell Heller, 
and Samuel Harnish; Kathleen Pool, John 
Miller, and Beatrice Fink, piano. 



Saner Kraut Supper 

For German Eaters 



The German Club was given a most 
delicious sauer kraut supper on Tuesday 
night, March 12, by Mrs. Messersmith, 
the mother of the president of the club. 
She was a charming hostess, and gave 
everyone a very delightful time. 

After the savory meal the club ad- 
journed into the living room where they 
sang old German songs. Specialty num- 
bers were: a vocal solo, "Still Wie Die 
Nacht" by Mrs. Messersmith; piano solos 
by Mary KaufFman, and piano and har- 
monica duets by Sylva Harclerode. 

Everybody was so enthusiastic about 
the .'inging that finally Miss Lietzau had 
to drag them regretfully away by main 
force. Those present were: E. Reinbold, 
S. Heilman, E. Frick, E. Powell, M. 
Kauffman, C. Spitler, R. Spohn, N. La- 
zin. R. Bright, S. Harclerode, E. Messer- 
smith, S. Evelev, Miss Lietzau, Mr, and 
Mrs. Messersmith and their daughter. 



Specialist Explains 

Honor System 

It is the purpose of the administration 
to entertain, on the L. V. campus from 
time to time, specialists in various fields 
of educational experiment work. This is 
done to keep the faculty well informed 
on present day educational trends. Re- 
cently, at a faculty dinner in the college 
dining hall, an address was delivered by 
Dr. H. J. Creighton, head of the depart- 
ment of chemistry at Swarthmore, ex- 
plaining the plan of the honors work, 
leading up to the comprehensive exami- 
nations of that college. 

The plan, heartily approved by the fac- 
ulty of Swarthmore, is as follows: The 
limited number of exceptional students, 
after pursuing their orientation courses 
during the freshman and sophomore years, 
are permitted to enter the honors work. 
They begin to major in a certain field to 
which they devote all their time. They 
are not required to attend regular classes, 
but they are required to meet the pro- 
fessors once a week in a seminar. At the 
end of four years' work, instead of tak- 
ing a regular course examination, they 
receive a comprehensive examination in 
the major field of study. It is called "com- 
prehensive" because it embraces every 
phase of that subject that a college stu- 
dent should know upon graduation. These 
exams, which are both written and oral, 
are given by professors of other institu- 
tions, making it impossible for local in- 
structors to coach the students for the 
exams. The faculty at Swarthmore are 
agreed that this system encourages a 
higher quality of work. It affords the 
exceptional student a chance to go far , 
beyond ordinary classroom work, which 
must be, of necessity, adapted to average 
or even poorer students. 

Our faculty members, according to Dr. 
Lynch, were very much impressed by Dr. 
Creighton's address and quite a number 
favored the introduction of the plan in 
one department in the near future. Only 
honor students, of course, will be eligible 
to enter the work. The nearest we have 
to the system is that "A" students are not 
required to conform to the "cut" rule. 
"The purpose of this system," says Dr. 
Lynch, "is not to promote idleness, but 
to stimulate the initiative of the student 
and to produce a higher quality of work. 
The average student works only for cred- 
its, and when he receives credit for a 
given course he does not make any spe- 
cial effort to profit further by a particu- 
lar course. In honors work' it is the field 
of knowledge that engages the student's 
;:ttention." 



CLIONIAN SOCIETY 

TO SPONSOR MOVIE 



(Continued from Page One) 

the co:;t was about $1,300,000. Yet it 
as time and money well spent for "The 
Lives of a Bengal Lancer" is just what 
you would expect, "a rich and engross- 
ing melodrama, concerned with heroism, 
pig-sticking, torture chambers, spies and 
the White Man's Burden, which should 
delight all occidental audiences and in' 
furiate Mahatma Gandhi." 

Tickets are being sold by the members 
of Clio and only those tickets sold by 
them will benefit the society. Support 
Clio and at the same time give yourself 
a good evening's entertainment. 



SAINT JOHNSBURY ACADEMY 

Saint Johnsbury, Vermont 

An Old New England Academy in an Old New England Town. Thorough 
preparation for college. Commercial courses. Dormitories for boys and girls. 
Tuition $550 covers all expenses. Scholarship aid for worthy boys and girls. 
WRITE PRINCIPAL STANLEY R. OLDHAM. L. V. C. 08 



LA VIE COLLEGIENNE, THURSDAY, MARCH 21, 1935 



PAGE THREE 




The least-passed-to man on the Blue 
and White quintet gained a place on the 
E. P- I. A. Coaches' second all-con- 
ference team. Clair Snell, lanky guard, 
was nosed out of first-team rating by 
Morris, Gettysburg guard, but was hon- 
ored with a position on the second five. 



According to the all-conference selec- 
tions, the classiest quintet which could be 
organized from the ranks of the teams of 
the Central Pennsy Collegiate League 
would include Jacobs and Cuchran at the 
forward posts, McMillan at the pivot po- 
sition and Wallace and Morris in the 
back court. 



Muhlenberg skyscraper, at center, and 
Sncll and Jim Woods, Albright, as guards. 



Selection with the second team is in- 
deed a great honor for the Lebanon Val- 
ley guard, for there is little to choose 
between the two all-conference quintets. 
The second outfit would be a formidable 
opponent for 'most any quintet. The dis- 
tinction becomes more appreciable when 
it is considered that Clair Snell is only a 
sophomore with two more years of col- 
lege basketball ahead of him. 



This aggregation includes four team 
captains who have served in their last 
court battles for their respective schools. 
Sam Jacobs captained the Franklin and 
Marshall five which finished the league 
schedule in third place. Lew Cuchran led 
the Muhlenberg Mules, the only quintet 
to register a triumph over the Gettysburg 
Bullets, perennial league champions. 
George McMillan was captain of the Bul- 
lets and was voted the outstanding play- 
er of the 1935 season because of his amaz- 
ing ball-handling ability and all-around 
play. Hen Wallace, who was awarded 
one of the guard posts, was leader of the 
Drexel Drag ons. These four stars, are all 
seniors, and the first three were also 
named on the 1934 all-conference five. 
"Moony" Morris, the other back-court 
selection, is not a senior and gained dis- 
tinction for the first time during this past 
season as a member of the Gettysburg 
outfit. 



The second team selections included 
Jack Fish, Gettysburg sophomore sensa- 
tion, and Roy Johnson, Ursinus, as for- 
wards, Art "Legs" Leibensperger, the 



Speaking of all-conference selections 
reminds us of the All-America ratings 
which were called to our attention sev- 
eral days ago. A tabulation of all-oppo- 
nent teams named by sixty basketball 
coaches resulted in the following choices: 

Bob Kessler, Purdue, and Ray Ebling, 
University of Kansas, forwards. 

Harry L. Edwards, University of Ken- 
tucky, center. 

Claire Cribbs, University of Pittsburgh, 
and Bill Nash, Columbia, guards. 



Last Wednesday Albright's Lions and 
the Drexel Dragons played off their 
scheduled games which had been called 
off on account of the measles epidemic 
at Albright. The Lions boosted them- 
selves into fourth place by registering a 
50-37 victory, at the same time shoving 
the Dragons down a notch. 



The final standings: 

„w. 

Gettysburg 11 

Muhlenberg 9 

F. and M 7 

Albright 4 

Drexel 4 

Lebanon Valley 3 

Ursinus 3 



L. 

1 

3 

4 

7 

8 

9 

9 



Pet. 
.917 
.750 
.636 
.364 
.333 
.250 
.250 



GIRL DEBATERS WIN 

FROM PENN STATE 



(Continued from Page One) 



ment ownership of munition plants, all 
points which had been recognized and 
met with sufficiently by the negative 



Frosh Sponsor Frolic 

Not to be daunted by Senior Balls, 
Junior Proms, and Soph Hops, the 
freshmen sponsored a dance last Fri- 
day night in the Alumni gym. 

Despite the dearth of numbers on 
the campus this past week-end a good- 
ly crowd attended the dance, which 
furnished a bright spot in what prom- 
ised to be an uneventful week-end. 
The campus extends- a vote of thanks 
to the ambitious frosh for injecting 
some life into the calendar. 

The couples danced to the rhythmic 
strains of the college orchestra and 
were chaperoned by Mr. and Mrs. 
P. L. Clements. 



team. In closing, he stated that the nega- 
tive debaters had probably "eaten more 
olives"— the favorite fruit of their god- 
dess, and for that reason he awarded the 
decision to the Lebanon Valley team. 

Two dual debates last week resulted 
in four defeats for Lebanon Valley. The 
men's affirmative team was defeated at 
Albright 4-1, while the negative team met 
Albright at home and lost the decision, 
3-0. 

At Elizabethtown a critic judge, Pro- 
fessor Cline of Franklin and Marshall 
College, awarded his decision to the girls' 
negative team of Elizabethtown College 
in preference to the Lebanon Valley af- 
firmative teant by a system of points, the 
final score being 7-5. The team at home 
was defeated by the Elizabethtown af- 
firmative team, 3-0. 



the theme is a gripping one, and that the 
scenes, both indoor and outdoor, are un- 
sparing in their realism. ChaTrles H. 
Whitman, of Rutgers University says, 
"In any event, it is a striking play by 
reason of its truth of characterization, 
its beauty of speech, and the gripping 
and cumulative power of its theme." 

There are ten characters in the play 
—striking, unusual but realistic figures 
such as O'Neill usually presents. Jasper 
Deeter, whose portrayal of a mentally 
deranged, broken-down old man in "The 
Inheritors" was admired so highly, is not 
only taking a prominent role but is direct- 
ing the production. The other leading 
roles will be played by Catherine Reiser, 
Walter Williams, and Ferd Nofer. The 
Hedgerow Theatre Players are the most 
famou-; and active of present theatrical 
companies and in "Beyond the Horizon" 
it is offering to all a most outstanding 
dramatic treat. 



D e J. Leopold Speaks 
To Business Students 



HEDGEROW PLAYERS 

GIVE MODERN PLAY 



(Continued from Page One) 



tracted by the lure of far horizons, who, 
thwarted of his ambition to venture into 
the world beyond the enfolding hills, is 
slowly choked to death in the stifling at- 
mosphere of a New England farm. The 
hills and the mountains that hem in the 
farm become to him a symbol of a crush- 
ing, irresistible force. Critics tell us that 



D. J. Leopold, vice-president of the 
First National Bank of Lebanon, was the 
guest speaker at the first meeting of the 
reorganized Commerce Club. The Leba- 
non banker gave a talk on banking, dis- 
cussing its general aspects as well as its 
most recent developments. Mr. Leopold 
al°o answered students' questions in a 
general informal discussion following his 
talk. 

Approximately forty members of the 
club were on hand, and undoubtedly pro- 
fited by their contact with the Lebanon 
bank executive, who is a veteran in his 
profession. 

President C. Edward Arndt turned the 
meeting over to Professor Stokes, who 
made a few preliminary remarks before 
introducing the speaker of the evening. 

Miss Grace Naugle and Miss Lois 
Harbold combined in the rendition of 
several piano duet numbers, and Mr. Al- 
bert Anderson also entertained with sev- 
eral piano selections. Mr. Anderson has 
been named music director of the club 
and will have charge of the music for 
future club gatherings. 



IN EARLY AMERICA WE READ 
THE PURITANS AND CAPTAIN 
MILES STAN DISH WHO-- 
ETC, . . ETC. ... 



i 



MILES WAS BASHFUL, SO ME 
SENT HIS FRIEND >JQHN ALDEN, 
—^ITP PROPOSE TO THE 
f^y^BEAUTIFUL PR15CILLA 

* PRISCILLA WA5 

iTHAT WAV ABOUT JItwere 
JOHN./ ' l 



Mi 



5 THE 



ARCHLY THE MAIDEN/5) SMILED, AND, 1 
WITH EYES OVER- ^//RUNNING WITH 

LAUGHTER .SAID, / ^ IN A 
TREMULOUS V0ICE,rq? 
"WHY DON'T YOU V - 
SPEAK FOR. 
YOURSELF, JOHN?"} -.\ 



mm 




THE TOBACCO THAT 5PEAKS 
FOR ITSELF BECAUSE OF ITS 
MILDNESS , MELLOWNE55,/ 
AND COOLNESS IS tt 

PRINCE ALBERT.^ 

WHAT FLAVOR /j 

1 M-M-M-M-M . 



■J, 




Copyright, 1935. R. J. Reynolds Tobacco Company, Winston-Salem. N.OL 



ounces \. ) *'<e." 



1 ALBERT 



2 

OUNCES 



hami Albert 



i 



PAGE FOUR 



LA VIE COLLEGIENNE, THURSDAY, MARCH 21, 1935 




M m m m m m I 

BREAKFAST 
Toasted Raisin Bread 
and 
Coffee 



THE PENNWAY 



Eva Le Gallienne 
Will Visit Hershey 

TO PRESENT "L'AIGLON" 



Performance Is Scheduled For 
Monday, March 25 — Large 
Crowd Expected 



Monday, March 25, marks a very im- 
portant event in the theatre life of many 
in the immediate vicinity. They are to 
witness a performance of that unique 
piece of humanity, Miss Eva Le Galli- 
enne in "L'Aiglon" {The Eaglet) at the 
Hershey Community Theatre. 

Miss Le Gallienne was born January 
11, 1899, in London, England. Her mother 
was Danish and her father French. 

In Paris, where she spent her adoles- 
cent days she worshipped at the altars of 
Bernhardt and Duse. In her adoration 
for Bernhardt, the child craved a copy of 
her autobiography, at that time an ex- 
pensive book out of print. She borrowed 
it, and after eight months of toil she had 
completed copying the entire eight hun- 
dred page work in two huge scrapbooks. 
This illustrates her "stick-to-itiveness" as 
Miss Le Gallienne expresses it. 

Even in those days she announced that 
by the time she was thirty-five she would 
have played the leads in "Peter Pan," 
"Hedda Gabler," "Romeo and Juliet," 
"The Master Builder," "La Dame Aux 
Camelias" and "L'Aiglon." In her thirty- 
fifth year Miss Le Gallienne has fulfilled 
her promise with 'L'Aiglon." 

When she was sixteen she made her 
debut in "The Laughter of Fools," and a 
year later she played her first part in 
America in "Mrs. Boltay's Daughter." 
Richard Le Gallienne, the poet, who had 
not seen Eva since she was three, attend- 
ed the play, and made this criticism, "My 
God, is that my daughter?" 

At twenty she was doing "Lidliom" 
and "The Swan," and had established 
herself as one of the world's foremost 
practicing actresses, a spot where she 
promises to stay for many a year. 

Through her efforts to make the thea- 
tre available to more people at lower 
prices, in 1926 she opened the far-famed 
Civic Repertory Theatre on Fourteenth 
street, New York, where she has achieved 
her end in making this theatre more than 
a commercial element. 

She is more than an actress, for she 
has had four honorary degrees from 
various schools in the United States. 
She has an M.A. degree from Tufts Col- 
lege, a doctor's degree from Russel State 
College, a Litt. D. from Smith College, 
and another Litt. D. from Brown Uni- 
versity. 

The actress is five feet four inches tall, 
weighs one hundred twenty-five pounds. 
She has more varied interests than most 
Thespians. She is an English Girl Scout, 
and won all the badges and prizes there 
were to win. She speaks and writes six 
languages, which she knows perfectly 
and is a superb fencer. 



"Y" CABINET MEMBERS 

INSTALLED AT CHAPEL 



(Continued from Page One) 



A. president, and Robert Cassel, as Y. M. 
C. A. president, were installed last Thurs- 
day, March 14, by President Lynch. 

The program opened with a song by 
the entire student body, after which the 
scripture lesson was read by Lena Cock- 
shott, retiring Y. W. C. A. president. 
Following a prayer by Warren Mentzer, 
retiring Y. M. C. A. president, Lena 
Cockshott gave a challenge which was 
accepted by Louise Gillan. A similar 
challenge was given by Warren Mentzer 
to the new Y. M. C. A. cabinet and ac- 
cepted by Robert Cassel. 

A quartet composed of Helen Summy, 
Charlotte Stabley, George Hiltner, and 
Kenneth Sheaffer then harmonized on 
"Take My Heart, O Father, Take It." 
Following this, President Lynch adminis- 
tered the oath of office to the presidents 
and cabinet members. 

The service closed with another num- 
ber by the quartet entitled "O Master, 
Let Me Walk With Thee." 



LA VIE COLLEGIENNE TO 
HAIL TENTH BIRTHDAY 



(Continued from Page One) 



ly, because the first letters of La Vie 
Collegienne represent the initials of our 
alma mater, L. V. C. 

Early evidences of the rise of the so- 
cial aspect in the literary societies is 
noted in an article which tells of the 
Kclo boys holding two joint sessions, one 
with Clio and the other with Delphian 
within the past few weeks. Entertain- 
ment was furnished by Miss Gingrich of 
Palmyra, who impressed the Delphian 
group with several cello selections, and 
by Hank Bezdek and his Irish comedians 
who royally entertained the other group 
with their sparkling humor. 

However, there is also a trace of the 
literary element still remaining in the so- 
cieties, for we read of a debate held by 
the Philos, in which Milford Knisely and 
Millard Miller uphold the affirmative side 
of the question, "Resolved, that exami- 
nations should be abolished," and Arnold 
Zwally and Clarence Ulrich successfully 
support the negative. 

The Lebanon Valley student a decade 
ago, like today, was given the oppor- 
tunity of hearing various artists who ap- 



Riviera Restaurant 

Oysters and Crab Cakes 
Breyer's Ice Cream 



CENTRAL 
Shoe Repair Shop 

A Trial Will Convince You! 
FRANK PI NUNZIO, Prop. 



peared on the chapel stage. Walter Chap- 
man, a piano soloist of repute from New 
York City, gave a marvelous recital in 
which he held his audience spell-bound. 
Some time earlier, Edmund Burke, a fa- 
mous singer, gave a concert at the Acad- 
emy at Lebanon, and at this affair Miss 
Ruth Engle proved herself an accom- 
plished accompanist. 

Browsing around for other items of in- 
terest, we find the following article un- 
der the heading "This and That": It is 
to be noted that Lebanon Valley College 
is up with the leaders in local impiove- 
ments. The laying of gutters and con- 
crete curbs is about finished, and with its 
property facing on three thoroughfares 
the task of the college was greater than 
that of any other in Annville." 

It might also be noted that it was at 
this time that a Historical Society was 
formed by H. H. Shenk to discuss events 
historical in nature, and yet not fully 
covered by the history courses; to collect 
and foster an interest in papers, docu- 
ments, pamphlets, and books of an origi- 
nal historical significance; and to compile 
and publish a paper dealing with some 
one event or personage who has hereto- 
fore been overlooked in the field of his- 
tory. At the first meeting of th; group, 
Henry T. Ishimura gave a talk on ' Ja- 
pan, its History and Customs." Walter 
Krause served as the society's first presi- 
dent. 

W.- also find a touch of that subtle 
humor which continues to characterize 
the La Vie. For instance, the following 
reference may clearly show a well-known 
local leader: "Who is the Frosh who 
wished that the fifteenth of November 
would come so that he could write to his 
girl? ? ? Twinkle, twinkle, gentle Starr." 
Or from the section known today as the 
Boomerang: 

"I have a date tonight." 

"Are you going to be busy?" 

"I don't know. It's the first time I've 
been out with him." 

Tsk! tsk! 



The Logical Place for L. V. C. 
Students to Buy 

BOOKS & SUPPLIES 
ESBENSHADE'S 

38 N. 8th St., Lebanon, Pa. 



KREAMER BROS. 



Leonard Elec. Refrigerators 
Hoover Electric Sweepers 
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Hail, The 
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To A Good 

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Baseballers 



LEBANON VALLEY COLLEGE 



VOL. XI 



ANNVILLE, PENNSYLVANIA, THURSDAY, MARCH 28, 1935 



No. 24 



Theatre and Movies 
Club Discussion at 
March Meeting 

INTERESTING TOPICS 



Group Participation and Criti- 
cism Liven General Reviews 
And Reports 



The theatre and movies was the topic 
for discussion at the recent March meet- 
ing of the Readers' Club. Emma Mary 
Smyser reviewed Mrs. Wiggs o[ the 
Cabbage Patch in a typical little girl 
style. She stressed the fact that the 
movie and the book were quite different, 
explaining in great detail their wide var- 
iation. It appears apparently that matri- 
monial bureaus are not a new stunt, for 
they play an important role in this hum- 
orous drama. 

Kenneth Eastland criticized the Lives 
of a Bengal Lancer, from a rather world- 
ly standpoint. He confessed that the 
movie was a series of thrills and excite- 
ment, but he could see no other value 
other than mere entertainment. This In- 
dian story portrays a brilliant picture of 
Indian life, as well as several excellent 
realistic character sketches. As Dr. Wal- 
lace kindly summarized, the movie was 
melodrama plus. Mr. Eastland, though 
opposed by many enthusiastic lancer 
worshippers, held to his former opinion 
that the action was over-emphasized and 
often unnecessary, taking one back "to 
his younger days" 

L'Aiglon was reviewed by Maxine 
Earley who stated that though the play 
•n itself was disappointing, Miss Eva 
LeGallienne's acting was superb. Ros- 
tand in this production is attempting to be 
realistic, and in order to fulfill his pur- 
Pose he presents a story of insanity. 
The character of Hamlet and Jasper 
Deeter s role in Inheritors were compared 
to this drama. 

The French Revolution as seen through 
the dexterous actions of the Scarlet Ptm- 
Ptrnel was discussed by Lois Harbold, In 
^Plaining the significance of the title, 
Miss Harbold disclosed the fact that the 
sca rlet primperel is not a childhood dis- 
eas e. but a crimson flower. In the critic's 

(Continued on Page 3, Column 4) 



GROUP MEETS 

IN PHILO HALL 



At the student prayer meeting held 
,n Philo hall Wednesday night, March 
y - Bruce Metzger delivered a short, 
j" s Piring address on the subject "The 
ea sonableness of Christianity." Mar- 
garet Paige played a very impressive 
^°hn solo entitled "Living for Jesus." 

ese Wednesday night prayer serv- 
|^ es ' which are held under the auspices 
the two "Y" cabinets and which 
j Fe conducted entirely by students, 
0r m a regular part of the college pro- 
-am. 



Frances Holtzman 
Elected May Queen 

Yesterday morning during chapel 
hour the student body elected Frances 
Holtzman Queen of the May. Catha- 
rine Wagner, who received the next 
largest number of votes, was chosen 
as maid of honor. 

The six senior girls who were elect- 
ed to be on the court of honor are as 
follows: Helen Earnest, Kotty Mc- 
Adam, Alma Cline, Betty Ford, Re- 
becca Adams, and Margaret Weaver. 

The pageant, which is scheduled to 
be held on Saturday, May 4, is under 
the direction of Miss Mildred Ken- 
yon, head of the department of phy- 
sical education for women, and Prof. 
Charles Sharr, head of the Harrisburg 
Ballet and Dramatic Dancing School. 



Valley Team Wins 

Munitions Decision 



A very interesting debate was held on 
Wednesday, March 20, between the L. 
V. C. affirmative team composed of C. 
Reber and M. Hostetter, and the U. of P. 
negative team, M. Shapiro and M. Dei-, 
bier. 

Dr. Butterwick as chairman introduced 
the debate which was quite entertaining 
because of the humorous remarks on both 
sides. The munitions question was the 
subject for debate. 

Rabbi A. L. Davidson, as critic judge, 
gave the decision to the affirmative with 
a score of 5-1. His comments about the 
debate and question for debate were en- 
joyed by the audience. 

The next and last debate this season 
will be with Lincoln University on April 
2, with the negative team traveling. 



Local Business Man 

To Address Group 

At a meeting on Monday, March 25, 
the program committee, consisting of C. 
Edward Arndt, George Smeltzer, and 
Dean Gasteiger, made further arrange- 
ments for the remaining Commerce Club 
meetings for this year. Prof. Stokes sug- 
gested that the club get speakers for the 
various meetings from the Lebanon Cred- 
it Exchange. Mr. Ferguson, the head of 
this exchange, had written the club offer- 
ing his assistance in the way of supply- 
ing speakers. It was decided that C. Ed- 
ward Arndt and George Smeltzer should 
go to Lebanon to see Mr. Ferguson. 
They secured Mr. George B. Jacobs, 
manager of the Lebanon Bon Ton store, 
for the meeting on Wednesday, April 3. 

The committee also decided to finish 
up the meetings with a dinner to be held 
possibly at the Hershey Golf Club on 
May 13. Prof. Stokes consented to write 
to a Mr. Charles E. Proscasco, C. P. A. 
from Harrisburg. If the club is able to 
secure Mr. Procasco for a speaker at 
the dinner, it will be indeed fortunate. 

(Continued on Page 2, Column 4) 



First Senior Ball Veteran Baseballers 
Successful Affair Report For Practice 

PLAY KENTUCKIANS BORAN TO CAPTAIN NINE 



Closed Dance For Dignified 
Upper Classmen and Their 
Guests 



On Saturday evening, March 23, the 
seniors instituted a new affair on the 
campus when they sponsored the first 
Senior Ball in the history of the school. 
The dance, held at the Colonial Ballroom 
in Lebanon, was a glorious success, and 
the novelty of the affair was increased 
by the introduction of a heretofore un- 
known band, the Kentuckians, into this 
community. 

Every senior was invited to come and 
bring whomever he wished; thus the af- 
fair was not strictly an exclusive one, but 
was rather enjoyed by any under-class- 
man who was fortunate to get the bid 
The new feature, plus the novel arrange- 
ments of a marvelous orchestra, made the 
affair an exceptionally lively one. All 
who attended agree that the Kentuckians 
brought the best jazz combination ever 
presented to a Lebanon Valley dance 
group. The heartening glow of mellow 
lights lent a vivid, delightful resplend- 
ency to the cheerful atmosphere of the 

(Continued on Page 3, Column 1) 



Only Two Members of the 1934 
Varsity Missing; High 
Hopes Held 



College Band 
Makes Debut To 
Large Audience 

EXCELLENT PROGRAM 



Delicious Supper Is Served To 
Band Members By U. B. 
Church 



The band has made its debut into a 
program that gives promise of a bright 
future. Monday night it opened its con- 
cert tour beginning with the Chambers- 
burg U. B. Church. The concert was ex- 
ceptionally well attended and received, 
and everyone is agreed that the trip was 
a success. The members of the band were 
very pleasantly received and entertained 
personally by a group of girls and wom- 
en who served an excellent supper for the 
band and associates as a reward for their 
trouble of traveling the distance from 
Annville to Chambersburg, a distance of 
about eighty miles. After the supper there 
was much merry-making in the form of 
cheers and songs. 

The concert began at eight o'clock be- 
fore an audience of about a thousand 
music lovers of that section. The pro- 
gram opened in fine style and continued 
in the same manner until the last echoes 
of the final chord of "The Star Spangled 
Banner" ceased their reverberations in 
the obscure confines of the large building. 
(Continued on Page 3, Column 1) 



Only two members of last year's nine 
were missing when Coach Metoxen called 
the baseball candidates for their first 
practice period Tuesday afternoon. Wil- 
liams and Whiting, a pair of sluggers, 
will not be available for this year's dia- 
mond aggregation. 

There remains a formidable array of 
veterans who should be moulded into a 
first-rate club with real championship 
hopes. The nine will be captained by 
Frank Boran, capable second baseman, 
who was considered the class of the sec- 
ond basemen of the Eastern Pennsylvania 
Collegiate Baseball League last year. 

In addition to Boran, the veteran Blue 
and White diamond aggregation includes 
Warren Mentzer, catcher; Charles Bar- 
tolet, first base; Charles Rust, shortstop, 
who combines with Boran to form the 
snappiest keystone combination in the 
league; "Dutch" Arndt, dependable third 
baseman; and 'Bill Smith, "Butch" Bar- 
thold, John Witter, and Paul Billett, out- 
fielders and pitchers. 

The pitching staff boasts two right- 
handers and two southpaws, Billett and 
Witter being the right-handed twirlers, 
and Barthold and Smith the left-handers. 
All these men have seen plenty of serv- 
ice in the past, Billett seeing action in 
non-league games last year and the rest 
manning the mound in league frays. 

Reserve strength is unusually good 
this year with infielders Capka and Fee- 
ser, outfielders Davies, Ralph Billett, 
Rozman, and Klipa, and John Tindall, 
pitcher and first baseman, ready for ac- 
tion. 

The eleven-game schedule will open 
April 27 when the Blue and White nine 
meets Dickinson at Carlisle. Whether 
or not the two scheduled games with Al- 
bright will be played is a matter of con- 
jecture, for the diamond sport had been 
dropped by officials of the Reading insti- 
tution but may be reinstated and con- 
tinued. 



"Y" TO SPONSOR 

LENT SERVICES 



The regular Y. M. C. A. vespers 
service was held last Sunday evening 
in the men's dormitory. Professor 
Gingrich, a member of the college fac- 
ulty, was the speaker for the evening. 
He chose as his topic "The Skepticism 
of Youth." 

The Y. M. C. A. is planning to 
sponsor a series of early morning serv- 
ices during Lent. These services are 
to be held in the college chapel on 
Wednesday mornings, beginning at 
6:30 o'clock. 



PAGE TWO 



LA VIE COLLEGIENNE, THURSDAY, MARCH 28, 1935 



iU #te (Lollegtenne 

ESTABLISHED 1925 

A Weekly publication by the Under- 
graduate Students of Lebanon 
Valley College 

EDITORIAL STAFF 

Helen Earnest, '35 Editor-in-Chief 

George Hiltner, '35 Associate Editor 

Richard Baus, *37 Managing Editor 

David Yake, '36 Asst. Man. Editor 

REPORTORIAL STAFF 

Catherine Wagner, '35 
Sylvia Evelev, '36 
Louise Gillan, '36 
Lester Krone, '36 
Marian Leisey, 36 
Maxlne Earley, '37 

Grace Naugle, '37 General Reporters 

Ida K. Hall, '35..... .Conservatory 

William Earnest, '37 Athletics 

Miriam Eichner, *37. Alumni 

Louis Straub, '37... .Philokosmian 

Charles Hauck, '35 Kalozetean 

Jane Shellenberger, 36 — .....Clionian 

Marietta Ossi, '35... .Delphian 



BUSINESS STAFF 

Kenneth Sheaffer, '35~.Business Manager 
Albert Anderson, '36...Asst. Bus. Manager 

Robert Cassel, '36 Circulation Manager 

Elwood Needy, '37 Asst. Cir. Manager 



Single Copies-. 
Subscription. — 



5 cents 

..$1.00 per year 



Entered at the Annville, Pa., post 
office as second class matter, under the 
Act of March 3, 1879. 



THURSDAY, MARCH 28, 1935 

ONLY NINETEEN DAYS 
MORE 



With a vacant brain and nibbled fin- 
ger nails I am still at a complete loss to 
know what to write in this editorial. Not 
one informative idea enters my head, and 
I can only gaze in despair at the page 
before me and wonder what words may 
flow from my hesitant pen. It is not only 
the dreaded influence of Spring but an 
added absolute lack of a suitable topic for 
discussion. 

It is too early to urge you to study for 
semester exams, Professor Shaar needs 
no cooperation as yet in urging May Day 
dancers to present themselves, Spring 
fever has been discussed, masculine 
charm and beauty have been extolled, 
thus leaving what possible topic for my 
journalistic talents? 

Ah yes, on second thought, nothing 
has been put down in black and white 
about our near future recess— the Easter 
holidays, known to many collegians as 
the Spring vacation. 

My one regret, however, is that our 
La Vie does not have a larger inter-col- 
legiate circulation, for so many of one's 
friends and acquaintances turn up their 
noses disdainfully at our beloved Alma 
Mater for we have no such highly valued 
creation as a Spring adjournment, but 
they are unaware that our Easter home- 
coming lasts seven delightful days, while 
most other colleges are permitted but a 
few days' leave. Only nineteen more 
days until we can bid Lebanon Valley a 
fond farewell for a short period of time, 
renew our home acquaintances, and then 
count the hours until our return. 

What will our program be in that 
hoped-for week? It is easy to guarantee 
that no one will suffer from a nervous 
breakdown produced from over-work dur- 
ing this time, and the best possible advice 
to be given and the most acceptable to be 
carried out is to leave thoughts of classes 
and text-books entirely behind, to relax 
completely, and then return with renewed 
interest, hope, and vigor for the final 
stretch. 



Lebanon Valley Baseball Captain 




FRANK BORAN 



Hats off to the blushing, young gallant 
from Minersville. Four years at this ven- 
erable institution have not cured Frankie 
of this youthful trait—a class recitation, 
an unexpected introduction, a bit of clev- 
er humor, and Frankie is crimson to the 
tips of his ears. But with all hi? other 
outstanding qualities we can easily for- 
give this prominent senior his one in- 
curable weakness. 

As junior prom leader last spring we 
acknowledge Frankie as one of our best- 
liked classmates. The co-eds will also 
hasten to inform you that out friend 



Boran is a dancer of no mean ability. 

Besides these social virtues we con- 
gratulate Frankie on being president of 
the Men's Senate, and an able executive 
we have found him to be. Sport* have 
also been popular with this athletic male, 
and we saw him in football, basketball, 
and baseball skirmishes throughout his 
college years. An appendicitis operation 
put Frankie into the spectators gallery 
for most of the sports' season, but we 
hope to see him on second basz again 
this spring. 




BEYOND CfeMPUS 



College girls from some 150 Eastern 
and Southern campuses and from as far 
west as Ohio State University are gath- 
ering in New York this week to talk 
about 350 different kinds of jobs. At 
forty round-tables held at the Hotel Astor 
under the auspices of the Institute of 
Women's Professional Relations the 
young delegates hope to gain in three 
days a panorama view of women's work, 
from aviation and advertising to housing. 

With Frances Perkins, Secreatry of 
Labor; Mrs. Franklin D. Roosevelt; and 
Senator Robert F. Wagner among the 
speakers, the conference is perhaps the 
most ambitious effort so far to focus pub- 
lic attention on the present occupational 
plight of the woman college and high 
sthool graduate. The girls will be told 
of the necessary training and qualifica- 
tions for various types of work, of work- 
ing conditions, and of the outlook for 
openings and advancement. The program 
is planned for three sections: college stu- 
dents and recent graduates; secondary 
school and junior college students; and 
deans and personnel officers.— New York 
Times. 



Is the popular girl apt to be healthy 
and bright? Records of 165 girls selected 
for good, average, or poor adjustment by 
deans of women in 55 colleges and high 
schools seem to show that this is true. 
Dr, Ruth Strang of Teachers' College! 
Columbia University, who made the 
study, concludes that the well-adjusted 
girl has a kind of elan vital which the 
others lack and which gives her an ad- 
vantage in almost every field. 



What's up to the minute in entertain- 
ment? 

Have you been listening to the Satur- 
day operas? Do this week! La Boheme, 
by Puccini, is to be broadcast from the 
Metropolitan Opera House. Lucrezia 



Bori, soprano, and Frederick Jagel, ten- 
or, are in the leading roles while Vin- 
cenzo Bellazza will conduct and Geral- 
dine Farrar is to be the commentator. 

Heading the screen favorites this week 
are "Roberta'' and "Ruggles of Red Gap." 
The former is the very successful adap- 
tation of the stage play of the same 
name. It is highly recommended for the 
tudents of singing, dancing, and next 
season's female fashions. The picture es- 
tablishes Fred Astaire more firmly than 
ever as the number one hoofer of the 
cinema and proves Ginger Rogers to be 
a wholly acceptable partner. "Ruggles 
of Red Gap" is a United States classic 
which tempts its actors to perfection as 
inevitably as it tempts audiences to ap- 
proval. The best that can be said of the 
picture is that it does thorough justice to 
the original as well as to provide a ve- 
hicle for the acting of Charles Ruggles, 
Mary Boland, ZaSu Pitts, and Roland 
Young. 

The book of the week seems the latest 
addition to Marlborough: His Life and 
Times, the third and fourth volumes. 
Scribners have been publishing this biog- 
raphy by Winston Churchill. Critics place 
it high among the long lists of biographies 
of famous statesmen. 

A close second is the enchanting look- 
ing "Attack on Everest." This volume 
recounts the stirring and breath-taking 
adventures of Hugh Rutledge and his as- 
sociates on their expedition to this famous 
peak. 



LOCAL BUSINESS MAN 

TO ADDRESS GROUP 



(Continued from Page One) 



He is not only a certified public account- 
ant, but has a vast knowledge of many 
other fields of business. 

Mr. Arndt appointed Lois Harbold as 
chairman of a refreshment committee for 
the meeting on April 3. 



SAINT JOHNSBURY ACADEMY 

Saint Johnsbury, Vermont 

An Old New England Academy in an Old New England Town. Thorough 
preparation for college. Commercial courses. Dormitories for boys and girls. 
Tuition $550 covers all expenses. Scholarship aid for worthy boys and girls. 
WRITE PRINCIPAL STANLEY R. OLDHAM. L. V C. 08 





a tale 

of two cities! 



Between your home town 
and college town may be 
many weary miles. But 
that's all right — mere miles 
mean little* 

Say the word by telephone 
and you're back home in 
a jiffy. It's as easy as it's 



1 



Call 100 miles for 60 cent* 
by Day Rate; for 50 cent* 
by Evening Rate; for 
35 cents by Night Rate. 
(Station to Station calls 
— 3 - minute connections.) 



The Bell Telephone Company of Pennsylvania 



No. 4- 



i 



LA VIE COLLEGIENNE, THURSDAY, MARCH 28, 1935 



page three 



COLLEGE BAND PLAYS 

AT CHAMBERSBURG 



(Continued from Page One) 



The program was as follows: 

1 . March, Boston Commandery, Carter. 

2. Selection from the Musical Comedy 
"He Wanted Adventure," Waller-Tun- 
bridge. 

3. Cornet solo, "Rock of Ages," Barn- 
house, by Earl Linger. 

4. Novelty, "Comin' 'Round the Moun- 
tain," Fillmore. 

5. Tenor solos, "The Hills of Home," 
Fox; "Invictus," Huhn, by Stuart Good- 
man. 

6. Sacred selection, Joy to the 
World," Barnhouse. 

7. Xylophone solo, "Raymond Over- 
ture," Thomas, by Emily Kindt. 

8. Modern Rhapsody, "Headlines," 
Colby. 

9. "Star Spangled Banner," Key. 

The band owes part of its success to 
Stuart Goodman and Emily Kindt for the 
fine solo work rendered by them as an 
added feature. Irma Keiffer very capably 
accompanied the soloists. Next Tuesday 
the band will play at the Fourth U. B. 
Church at York. 



FIRST SENIOR BALL 

SUCCESSFUL AFFAIR 



(Continued from Page One) 



entire hall, while the orchestra, shrouded 
in a veil of bluish haze, presented a 
dreamy background to the amber tint. 

Numerous faculty members accepted 
the general invitation extended to the en- 
tire faculty to attend this first senior af- 
fair of the year, and these added to the 
cheerfulness of the frolic. Mrs. Green, 
Dr. and Mrs. Clyde Lynch, and Dr. and 
Mrs. Wallace served as hosts and host- 
esses to the group. 

The class of '35 deserves special com- 
mendation for the innovation of such an 
enjoyable affair. 



Campus Cuts 

Spring is here! There's evidence every 
where. What with the robins, the blue- 
birds, the walks to Kreider's, new couples 
every day, the annual campus baseball 
practice, and last but not least the water- 
battles. What a great battle that was 
one day last week! The consequences — 
only time and the men's Senate can tell. 



Clio's benefit movie brings golden op- 
portunity to many a Clionian. There's 
Ivy, for instance. It's not enough that 
she sells the men's dorm tickets but her 
own charming company is offered .^s well. 
What an inducement and may there be 
more benefits. 



Johnny Gongloff must find Lebanon 
Valley very boring after the week-end in 
Pittsburgh. How about that week-end, 
Johnny? 



A new use for Kreider's lily pond! To 
sail boats, or go swimming, or for water 
polo? Nary a one. Some of our fair 
freshmen find it very satisfactory, how- 
ever, for a feet-washing party — or was 
it a feet-mudding party? 



The gossips think Bill Zierdt could 
find much better places to run out of gas 
than on the lonely road out near the 
Water Works. Even with such agree- 
able company when the tank is actually 
empty that's pretty far to walk. 



The often longed-for elevator system 
in the ad building may become a reality. 
In fact such a contraption was in use this 
week. Fran Holtzman, the first passen- 
ger, found it very successful. For full 
particulars concerning general use and 
hours of running see Spickler. 



What an opinion Chambersburg will 
have of L. V. Any day we expect to re- 
ceive donations for the dining hall. Cer- 
tainly they had every evidence to believe 
that those poor band fellows don't get 
enough to eat here. 



And speaking of Chambersburg. — Bet 
Howe Keiter hopes the band goes over 
there soon again. 



The peace-loving inhabitants of our 
fair city were. rather rudely aroused from 
their beauty slumber a few nights ago 
by the raucous clattering of collegiate 
hoofs on Annville's well-kept pavements. 
The noise, which commenced precisely as 
the clock in the Ad Building was striking, 
grew to a furious din, accompanied by 
sundry puffs, gasps, and an assortment of 
pulmonary wheezings never heard around 
here before. It developed that two peo- 
ple — a co-ed who is an inmate of West 
Hall, and a co-Edward who infests the 
west end of the second floor of the men's 
dorm, were racing madly toward the 
northwest corner of the campus, which 
spot marks the habitat of the aforemen- 
tioned damosel. As this lady is no mean 
sprinter, she experienced little or no diffi- 
culty in outstripping her phlegmatic es- 
cort. She had just heard the clock strike, 
and indeed she knew full well that to ar- 
rive at the dorm after ten o'clock would 
mean a summary court martial. The gen- 
tleman was bringing up the rear in splen- 
did style when they arrived at West Hall. 
At this point, however, the over-taxed 
constitution of the track flash from Tren- 
ton gave way and she collapsed, but 
while she was in the act of gracefully 
collapsing she managed to find breath 
for a triumphant gurgle. 

"I made it, Lloyd," she panted, "I made 

it." 

The astounded incumbents of West 
Hall waddled out to the porch to ascer- 
tain the cause of the unseemly disturb- 
ance. Their glances went from the per- 
spiring young man who had barely man- 
aged to mount the steps, to the heaving 
form of their exhausted sister. 

"Warum bist du so fruh zuruckgekom- 
men?" they queried in chorus. "Es ist 
doch erst neun Uhr!" 

"Only nine o'clock!" shrieked our Jean. 
"I thought that was ten that just struck!" 
Selah. 



THEATRE AND MOVIES 
TOPIC FOR READERS* CLUB 



(Continued from Page One) 



opinion this movie is the best production 
of Leslie Howard's marvelous dramatic 
skill— from the old hag to the silly Eng- 
lish fob, from the ridiculous to the sub- 
lime. 

David Copperfield, the novel by 
Charles Dickens and the film production, 
was reviewed by Helen Earnest. It is a 
movie deserving great praise in its accur- 
ate following of minute detail and in ex- 
cellent character selection. W. C. 
Fields, Roland Young, and Richard 
Bartholomew reveal unknown depths of 
dramatic ability There is but one regret 
or criticism, and that is that it could 
not include all the characters and in- 
cidents of the story as revealed by Dick- 
ens. 

O'Neill's morbid but interesting play 
Beyond the Horizon was reviewed by 
Jean Harnish. It was pointed that the 
drama has great possiblities for produc- 
tion, and is evidently an appealing theme 
to Jasper Deeter. One member of the 
group called for a dose of arsenic which 
he considered appropriate after a discus- 
sion of O'Neill. 

Carolyn Kohler explained the story of 
Green Pastures in an interesting manner, 
by briefly but clearly stating the main 
items of the play— the creation of Adam 
and Eve, the flood, with a final culmina- 
tion in the crucifixion of Christ. The 
choir seems to be the most outstanding 
feature of this portrayal of the Old Test- 
ament conception of God and the Bible. 

With these reviews the meeting came 
to a close, and the topic for the next 
month's meeting was announced— Banned 
German Books— to be in charge of Emma 
J. Reinbold. 



Prof: What happened to the Titanic? 
Bartolet: He was shot. 



For a change: The laundry sent back 
some buttons with no shirt on. 



ART 




PIPE CLASS 



l ITS A N ART TO MAKE 

. PRINCE ALBERT 

SO MILD - SO LONG-BURNING 
- SO FREE FROM "TONGUE 
BITE" — ITS THE TOP IN 
PIPE PLEASURE — 



iQV'Q^AUfy Wl LL NOT BITE YOUR TONGUE' 
TOBACCO . . c \ 

csjaap y^-^/^u 

CUT 




hllNGEA 




LBERT 




THE NATIONAL 
JOY SMOKE! 



PAGE FOUR 



LA VIE COLLEGIENNE, THURSDAY, MARCH 28, 1935 




M m m m m m ! 
BREAKFAST 
Toasted Raisin Bread 
and 
Coffee 



THE PENNWAY 



Freshman Theme 



WHAT I KNOW ABOUT 
COWBOYS 



It is commonly believed east of the 
Mississippi that the cowboy, except for 
a few preserved specimens in the cheap- 
er moving pictures, is an extinct species 
of the genus homo sapiens. But this be 
lief, like the story which mammas tell 
their inquisitive little boys about the 
stork, is false. Cowboys— real, honest 
to-goodness, live, bow-legged cowboys, 
do exist. I know, for I have seen them 

Out on the great rolling plains of the 
West, where men, as Teddy Roosevelt 
used to say, are men and smell like 
horses, the cowboy works and sweats and 
cusses and rides. He neither looks nor 
acts like the moving picture or ranch 
novel hero. His face and hands are dirty, 
his head uncombed and unshorn. He 
wears overalls and canvas gloves because 
they are cheap and durable. His Stetson 
is often the worse for wear. From a dis- 
tance he might be mistaken for a Penn- 
sylvania German farmer were it not for 
the curve of his legs, for most cowboys 
today do as much farm work as ranch 
work. 

When I went West several years ago, 
I expected to learn to ride as well as the 
Westerner. For three years I rode and 
rode, but I never quite acquired that cer- 
tain something which cowboys have and 
I. lack the ability to stay with the horse. 
My efforts were not entirely in vain, 
however, for I did learn to fall properly. 
This in itself is an achievement. 

One of the most amusing characteris- 
tics of the cowboy is his fondness for 
western pictures. Whenever he goes to 
town.he goes to see a moving picture of 
the old West. Strangely enough, he does 
not laugh or sneer at the movie hero; On 
the contrary he envies him. 

HANS ERICH KOENIG 
(The Modest Frosh). 



CONSERV NOTES 



This past week has been a very busy 
one for the Conservatory. Monday eve- 
ning two band concerts were presented. 
The boys' band journeyed to Chambers- 
burg where they gave a concert at the 
First U. B. Church, under the direction of 
Professor Rutledge. The same evening 
the girls' band under the gracious baton 
of Professor Carmean gave a concert in 
the chapel for the Palmyra Automobile 
Club. The soloists for the Chambersburg 
concert were: Emily Kindt, Earl Linger, 
Stuart Goodman, and Irma Keiffer ac- 
companist. The soloists for the girls' 
band were: Kathleen Pool, Sara Light, 
piano-organ duo; Katherine Knoll, xylo- 
phone; Charlotte Stabley, soprano; Mar- 
tha Elser, violin; Nancy Bowman and 
Ruth Buck, accompanists. 

Two student recitals will be presented 
next week. Robert Breen, cornet; Bea- 
trice Fink, Katherine Knoll, Helen Sum- 
my, Charlotte Stabley, piano; and the 



girls' string quartette consisting of Helen 
Butterwick, violin; Margaret Paige, vio- 
lin; Helen Summy, viola, and Ruth 
Goyne, 'cello; and Sara Light as the ac- 
companist will appear in the Monday 
evening recital. Those appearing in the 
Wednesday evening recital are: Nancy 
Bowman, soprano; Oleta Dietrick, Lucille 
Mayberry, Esther Koppenhaver, Cordelia 
Schaeffer, and Elizabeth Bingaman, pi- 
ano; Ruth Buck as the accompanist; the 
boys' string quartet consisting of Jack 
Schuler, violin; Robert Sausser, violin; 
Russell Heller, viola, and Samuel Har- 
nish, 'cello; and also a string sextette. 

Ernest Koch was in charge of the pro- 
gram last Friday morning. This week 
Dale Roth is planning the program. 




Some of these share-the-wealth advo- 
cates might look at Al Capone. He tried 
it and got eleven years. 



Tony says a good poker-player can 
successfully handle almost any job. Per- 
haps so says Phillips, but what would a 
good poker-player want with a job? 



P. Fridinger— "Say, ma, what's the 
idea of making me sleep here every 
night?" 

Ma— "Ssh, dear, you only have to 
sleep in the piano for two more weeks, 
and then your picture will be in all the 

newspapers." 



Furlong— "Hey, Prof!" 

Gingrich — "Yeah?" 

Furlong— "You all right?" 

Gingrich— "Yeah." 

Furlong— "Then I've shot a bear.' 



It is pointed out in a newspaper article 
that there are hundreds of empty garrets 
in London. Modern poets refuse to starve 
them. 



Kinney (after Kalo play): "What's 
the verdict?" 

Leech: "I'm afraid it's touch and go." 

Kinney: "All right. What do I touch 
and when do I go?" 



Lady Astor 

Is a past-master 

Of snappy interjecs 

About the general thraldom of her sex. 



Kell— Can I catch the 6:45 if I take a 
cut across your field? 

Sheaffer-If my bull sees you, you'll 
catch the 6:15. 



Baby bonds are now on sale~Tet's 
hope no purchaser will have to walk the 
floor with them later on. 



Glee Club Presents 

Harrisburg Concert 

The Lebanon Valley College Glee 
Club and soloists will give a concert 
Thursday evening at Sixth Street U. B. 
Church in Harrisburg. This will prob- 
ably be one of the most outstanding con- 
certs of the season. 

The program: 

Invocation of Orpheus Peri 

My Dream of Love Liszt-McLeod 

The Heavens Resound Beethoven 

Glee Club 

The Hills of Home Fox 

Invictus Huhn 

Stuart Goodman, Tenor 

Lost in the Night Christiansen 

Winter and Spring Borowski 

Beautiful Savior Christiansen 

Bethlehem Night Warrell 

Glee Club 

1st Movement, Concerto for Violin and 

Piano Mendelssohn 

Martha Elser, Violin 
Oliver K. Spangler, Piano 

Joshua Fit de Battle ob Jericho Gaul 

It's Me, O Lord Cain 

Shortnin' Bread Wolfe 

Glee Club 

Serenade Titl 

Anthony Jagnesak, Flute 
Homer Barthold, Clarinet 
Pilgrims' Chorus, from "Tannhauser" 

Wagner 

Cecil Oyler, Trumpet, Nancy Bow- 
man, French Horn, Henry Steiner, 
Trumpet, Dale Roth, Trombone 

Sarabande Bohm 

Fairy Tale Komzak 

Intermezzo Pizzicato Neury 

Violin Quartet— Martha Elser, Oleta 
Dietrick, Russell Hatz, Margaret Paige 

A-Hunting We Will Go Kountz 

The Bubble Friml 

The Bugle of Spring Pitcher 

Glee Club 



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LEBANON V ALLEY COLLEGE 



VOL. XI 



ANNVILLE, PENNSYLVANIA, THURSDAY, APRIL 4, 1935 



No. 25 



Yake Appointed 
Editor-in-Chief of 
La Vie Collegienne 

FACULTY GIVES DECISION 



New Staff Will Be Announced 
In Forthcoming Issue of 
Weekly 



The reins of power for the year 1935- 
1936 for the La Vie Collegienne will rest 
in the hands of David Yake, of Lebanon, 
Pennsylvania, who was recently appoint- 
ed editor-in-chief of the student publica- 
tion. The various other staff positions 
have not been filled as yet, but the in- 
coming editor and the faculty committee 
will perforin these sacred rites for the 
publication of the next issue. 

His sophomore year Mr. Yake func- 
tioned efficiently on the reportorial staff 
ol the newspaper, acquainting himself 
with the literary phase of the work. This 
year he assisted Richard Baus with the 
managing details of newspaper make-up. 
As the editor of the 1936 Quittapahilla, 
Mr. Yake has clearly proved his literary 
and managing powers, and also as a 
member of the Green Blotter Club, to- 
gether with his wide experience in vari- 
ous newspaper fields, the faculty feels 
confident of the successful sailing of the 
ship of printed student feeling. 

This spring term offers to the new 
staff a splendid opportunity to secure 
definite hold of the work, for in these 
Half dozen issues before the summer va- 
cation a readjustment can be made and 
many minor problems can be solved be- 
fore the busy fall session taxes their time 
and efforts. It is one of Lebanon Valley's 
customs to install the new members at 
tMs appropriate season filled with many 
; iew.< items, anniversary plays. May Day 
Pageants, dance rehearsals, <>nd numer- 
ous other interesting topics for news 
articles. 



Senators Do Justice 
To Country Dinner 

Lebanon Valley's Men Senate en- 
joyed a banquet at Shartlesville last 
Wednesday night. The menu, consist- 
ing of chicken and waffles along with 
some fifty-odd other dishes was found 
to be quite the delight of the senators, 
n ot to mention the faculty committee- 
men. 

A social session followed the feast, 
with Frank Boran presiding. Dr. 
Lynch, Dr. Light, Prof. Grimm, and 
LV Wagner made r few remarks, as 
^11 as a number of the senators. The 
r ecent decision to have the Carmeans 
reside in the men's dormitory next 
year is looked upon by Jill concerned 
ns a valuable coordinating link be- 
tween the faculty, the senate, and the 
male element of the student body, and 
H distinct improvement in living con- 
ditions in the men's dormitory is anti- 
cipated. 



Stevensons Give Tea 
For Valley Cabinet 



The members of the International 
Relations Club have unanimously 
agreed that their meeting of March 28 
was the best of the year. On this 
Thursday afternoon the club was in- 
vited to the home of the Stevensons 
for tea. Over the teacups practically 
everything was discussed — everything 
from dorm life to drama and thence to 
Hitler. The hospitality of the Steven- 
sons and this hour or two of informal 
chatting together was enjo/ed vo l.'ie 
full by everyone. 



Children of the Moon 
Fast-Moving Drama 
For Clio-Philo Cast 



TO BE ANNIVERSARY PLAY 



Joint Production to Be Presented 
May 3, Coached By Dr. 
George Struble 



"Children of the Moon," by Martin 
Flavin, has been chosen as the Anniver- 
: ary Play to be presented by the Phiio 
and Clio literary societies on Friday eve- 
ning, May 3. Under the supervision of 
the coach. Dr. Struble, tryouts have been 
hold, and the cast hai been selected to 
start active rehearsing. The play is ex- 
pected to reveal new dra.natL taienr on 
the campus, for all of the female roles 
wi'.l be played by freshma-i git Is and sev- 
eral o ( . the male characters are relatively 
rew at the game. 

The play concerns the attempt of 
Madame Atherton to aid her grand- 
daughter, Jane, against the wishes of 
Jane's mother, to marry Major Bannis- 
ter, a young pilot. John Bannister is re- 
cuperating in the isolated Atherton home 
from injuries received in an airplane 
crash. Jane defies her mother in all at- 
tempts to prevent her marriage to the 
aviator. As a last resort, Laura, Jane's 
mother, warns Jane that she has no right 
to marry as she is one of the moon-mad 
Athertons. She gives Jane further proof 
by telling her of the tendency in the Ath- 
erton family to be affected by the power- 
ful influence of the moon. Jane resists her 
mother and endeavors to prove that she 
is not mad. The remainder of the story 
involves the overwhelming forces against 
(Continued on Page 3, Column 4) 



PRAYER MEETING 



At the regular student prayer service 
held Wednesday night in Philo Hall, 
Mary Haddox, a junior who transferred 
to L. V. C. from Shenandoah College 
last fall, presented a very fine talk on the 
subject "The Cost of Being a Friend." 
Miss Haddox was preceded on the pro- 
gram by Grace Naugle, who played the 
first movement of Beethoven's "Moon- 
light Sonata" on the piano. 



Pageant Theme 

For May Day 

"ALICE IN WONDERLAND" 



Childhood Story Book Friends 
To Be Reintroduced to 
College Campus 



The theme of the May Day pageant 
promises to be a little different this year 
from any of the past performances. The 
title of the pageant is "Springtime In 
Story-Book Land." The plot revolves 
around Alice in Wonderland who comes 
in with a large story book. She dances 
around until she gets weary enough to 
read; then the sandman comes and puts 
her to sleep with a magic dream ring. 
The sandman calls the elves to see Alice, 
and they join him in a dance and then 
put Alice on a couch. 

Presently Mother Goose and some of 
her family enliven the dream of Alice. 
There is a group of Mary, Mary's, Sim- 
ple Simon's, Red Riding Hood's, Little 
Boy Blue's. They all go to the throne 
where Mary discovers her flowers need 
watering. As each one is taken care of 
it springs to new life, and Mary soon 
has a pretty row of dancing posies. 

King Cole swaggers to the scene and 
calls for his pipe, bowl, and fiddlers three 
who all trip in gaily. Then the Queen of 
(Continued on. Page 3, Column 2) 



Dr. Pooley Gives 
Address At Chapel 

GUEST OF DR. STRUBLE 



Visitor Lectures Chaucer Class 
About His Modern English 
Translations 



The college campus was privileged to 
hear a short address by Dr. Robert C. 
Pooley in a recent chapel program. Dr. 
Pooley, a member of the English depart- 
ment at the University of Wisconsin, 
opened his remarks by hop'ng that he 
was not an appropriate speaker for April 
Fool's day. As the keynote to his ad- 
dress he quoted from an ode of Words- 
worth's, showing the poet's loss of the 
earlier glory and freshness in life, the joy 
that fades with the years. Dr. Pooley in- 
troduced this thought in connection with 
life on the college campus, especially life 
on a small campus where it is possible 
for intimate relations to exist between 
the faculty and the student body. It is his 
opinion that business is q-.uning too im- 
portant a place in modern college life- 
all phases of this higher education seem 
to be linked up in some way with the 
business world, a mere imitation of post- 
college days. 

Dr. Pooley concluded his message with 
a plea to cherish this four-year period 
when worldly activities can be laid aside, 
(Continued on Page 3, Column 1) 



Basketball League 
Statistics Revealed 



L. V. C. CAPTAIN FOURTH 



Barthold Trails Fish; Leiben- 
sperger, and Johnson In 
League Scoring 



Statistics released recently by league 
officials show that Stewart "Butch" Bar- 
thold, Lebanon Valley basketball captain, 
ranked fourth among the leading scorers 
in the Central Pennsylvania Collegiate 
League during the past season. The Blue 
and White forward counted 45 field goals 
and 22 fouls for a total of 1 1 2 points. 

Gettysburg's sensational sophomore 
forward, Jack Fish, copped top honors 
with 140 counters, sporting a margin of 
16 points over his nearest rival Muhlen- 
boig'.; "Legs" Leibensperger, who ac- 
•:c unfed for 124 of the Mules tallies 

Charlie Rust was second highest among 
the L. V. C. scorers with 89 points, a suf- 
ficiently high number to land him in thir- 
teenth position in league scoring. The 
othei Blue and White points were regis- 
tered by Smith, who had 61, Patrizio, 
who gathered 55, Billett, 48, Snell, guard, 
who achieved all-conference second team 
honors, 41, Boyd Sponaugle, 13, and 
Kinney, a single foul counter. 

The flashy Gettysburg Bullets showed 
the way in team scoring with a total of 
524 points in twelve games, an average 
of 43.7 per game. Muhlenberg registered 
467 in the same number of encounters for 
an average of 38.9 per gome. The Leba- 
non Valley quintet counted 420 points in 
a dozen contests for an average of 35 per 
game, the second lowest rating in the 
circuit. The Blue and White did snare 
some honors, however, their 104 foul con- 
versions leading the league in the free 
throw department. 

The Bullets were also the best defen- 
sive outfit in the league, holding their op- 
ponents to 27.2 points per game. Muhlen- 
berg's foes were able to count only 357 
points against them, an average of 32.5 
per contest. Lebanon Valley's opponents 
registered a total of 510 points, or 42.5 
per game, which was better than only one 
other team's defensive showing The Al- 
bright Lions allowed their foes an average 
of 45.4 points per game. 



Glee Club Presents 

Red Lion Concert 



The Glee Club gave a concert in 
Red Lion on Thursday, April 4. The 
Glee Cluh was ably assisted by Char- 
lotte Stabley, contralto; Stuart Good- 
man, tenor; Earl Linger, cornet; An- 
thony Tagnesak and Homer Barthold, 
flute and clarinet duet; the violin quar- 
tet, Martha Elser, Oleta Dietrich, 
Russell Hatz, and Margaret Paige; 
and the cornet quartet— Earl Linger, 
Cecil Oyler, Henry Steiner, and Wil- 
liam Black. 



PAGE TWO 



LA VIE COLLEGIENNE, THURSDAY, APRIL 4, 1935 



ia Viz CoUegtenne 

ESTABLISHED 1925 

A weekly publication by the Under- 
graduate Students of Lebanon 
Valley College 



EDITORIAL STAFF 

Helen Earnest, '35... Editor-in-Chief 

George Hiltner, '35 Associate Editor 

Richard Baus, '37 Managing Editor 

David Yake, '36 „..Asst. Man. Editor 

REPORTORIAL STAFF 

Catherine Wagner, '35 
8ylvia Evelev, '36 
Louise Qillan, '36 
Lester Krone, '36 
Marian Leisey, 36 
Maxine Earley, '37 

Grace Naugle, '37...- 

Ida K. Hall, '35 

William Earnest, '37„ 

Miriam Eichner, '37. 

Louis Straub, '37 

Charles Hauck, '35 

Jane Shellenberger, 36-., 
Marietta Ossi, '35 



General Reporters 

Conservatory 

....Athletics 

Alumni 

Philokosmian 

Kalozetean 

„ Clionian 

Delphian 



BUSINESS STAFF 
Kenneth Sheaffer, '35...„Business Manager 
Albert Anderson, '36...Asst. Bus. Manager 

Robert Cassel, '36 Circulation Manager 

Elwood Needy, '37 Asst. Cir. Manager 



Single Copies.. 
Subscription. 



5 cents 

$1.00 per year 



Entered at the Annville, Pa., post 
office as second class matter, under the 
Act of March 3, 1879. 



THURSDAY, APRIL 4, 1935 



SWAN SONG 



Fare thee well for we must leave thee, 
'tis the parting La Vie issue to be pre- 
sented by the senior staff. A fond adieu, 
student body, a fond adieu, but the first 
week in April annually brings with it a 
shift in newspaper authority, and now 
according to precedent the class of 1935 
answers the clarion call of custom and 
resigns its former duties to the incoming 
staff manned by junior leadership. 

It has generally been the Swan Song 
policy to recapitulate the progress made 
in the past year, but such changes that 
have been favorably effected have in turn 
been noticed by discerning students, and 
as to the unfavorable aspects of this 
work we had our share of adverse criti- 
cisms, making it wholly unnecessary to 
review our poor points for public atten- 
tion and print. 

Let us confine our goodbye message 
then to thanking the various staff mem- 
bers for their untiring efforts throughout 
the past year. It is not necessary to say 
that at times securing newspaper articles 
from the faithful reporters was like pull- 
ing teeth or collecting a long over-due 
bill, resulting in worries and unpleasant 
words. In the main, however, the work 
was done quite faithfully and conscien- 
tiously. 

The shrunken newspaper budget neces- 
sitated either a semi-monthly publication 
or a reduced size in the individual week- 
ly issue. After some serious considera- 
tion on the part of the faculty commit- 
tee and the student executives, we intro- 
duced the Lilliput edition to the campus, 
feeling that a weekly issue could be es- 
sentially more alive than the other pro- 
posed plan. An improved grade of news- 
paper is now being used in the publica- 
tion, but several economies have helped 
to reduce the cost in comparison to last 
year's bill. 

In closing, it is with mingled emotions 
that we, the senior staff, hand over our 
reins of power to the incoming juniors— 
joy that our hours of toil are at an end, 
but with regret that our college news- 
paper days are over, another evidence of 



Queenie 




FRANCES HOLTZMAN 



For I'm to be Queen o/ the May, 
mother. Oh, yes, to be sure, and may 
we too add our congratulations, Fran? 
This attractive bit of feminity has been 
chosen to rule the annual college court, 
and we predict that she will be a very 
attractive sovereign. Our queen hails 
from Harrisburg, and in her two years' 
residence with us has gained a decided 
amount of popularity. Her simplicity in- 



vites one to be friendly with her. 

Her interests also go beyond the col- 
lege campus, and we hear that Fran has 
a peculiar yen for other than Lebanon 
Valley males. Her admirers are numer- 
ous, for one sees Fran at all the social 
functions accompanied by some ardent 
admirer. More power to you, queenie. 

Here's to the Queen of the May! Drink 
her down! 



the end of our school days when we must 
actively not passively deal with the out- 
side world. We wish our successors joy 
and success in their hew tasks, the editing 
and managing of the La Vie Collegienne. 



VOX POPULI 



Dear Editor: 

The element of precedent as a factor 
in the regulation of many things is often 
discredited with the argument that it is 
often wholesome to break away from the 
past, the conventional method, and intro- 
duce novelty. However, in every instance 
this does not apply, and it is felt that oft- 
entimes to neglect precedent is to do in- 
justice to those who have been ruled by it. 

Heretofore, in the selection of Anni- 
versary Play casts, it has been the gen- 
eral rule to give those students who are 
members of the upper-classes the prefer- 
ence, or at least, the edge over under- 
classmen for the simple reason that they 
are nearing their final days in college, 
and the anniversary of their society is 
much more significant to them than to the 
newer students whose interest and ex- 
perience is much narrower, and therefore 
less significant. It is no more than fitting 
than that the final activities of the clos- 
ing celebrations of a social organization 
should be given over chiefly to those who 
have been actively engaged in the inter- 
ests of that organization for a period of 
three or four years. It will surely be an 
unusual experience that many of the up- 
per-classmen will have this year, to sit 
back and watch the biggest event of their 
society conducted for the n*>st part by 
members whose interest and pride cannot 
begin to measure up to theirs. This fact 
surely demands consideration, and it is 
believed that at times even superb ability 
should give way to experience, pride, 
and probably what may be termed only 
partial ability. Ability applied demands 
interest, and interest demands, or at least 
is abetted by experience, and pride. 

—A Wondering One. 



South Hall girls must be right up on 
playing checkers. Any inmate of that 
dorm must be ready when it is her move 
— especially on Sunday nights when the 
line reaches from the porch into the par- 
lor. 



Kalo Celebration At 
General Sutter Hotel 



This week-end the campus will be more 
densely populated than it has been for 
the past few weeks, for it is Kalo'.s hour 
in the sun. 

Festivities begin tomorrow night at 
eight with the presentation of the Kalo- 
Delphian play, "As Husbands Go," by 
Rachel Crothers. This is a delightfully 
modern play which has enjoyed a long 
Broadway run, in fact it is still playing 
stock companies on the road. It was 
filmed last year starring Ann Harding 
and Warner Baxter. "As Husbands Go" 
is one of America's most entertaining 
contributions to the theatre, an excellent 
example of the American comedy of do- 
mestic realism. Both Dr. Struble and Dr. 
Stonecipher have by their sacrifice of 
time and effort in their direction of the 
play proved themselves invaluable. 

When the curtain falls upon the last 
act the assembled guests are cordially in- 
vited by Kalo and Delphian to partake of 
more entertainment in the guise of a dance 
in the gym. 

On Saturday night the Kalo men will 
shine for it is their night. They and their 
dates will hie themselves off to Lititz 
and the General Sutter hotel for their 
traditional and scintillating dinner-dance. 
This affair gives all promise to be an out- 
standing event this year. 

The combination of the music of Ira 
Bowman's well-known orchestra and the 
homey hospitality of the General Sutter 
converts this promise into a certainty. An 
added attraction will be the distribution 
of favors at the dance. This moment will 
hold as much surprise for the men as for 
the girls because only the "favor com- 
mittee" has the least idea what the favors 



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Saint Johnsbury, Vermont 

An Old New England Academy in an Old New England Town. Thorough 
preparation for college. Commercial courses. Dormitories for boys and girls. 
Tuition $550 covers all expenses. Scholarship aid for worthy boys and girls. 
WRITE PRINCIPAL STANLEY R. OLDHAM. L. V. C. 08 



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«* e * hOB lb « 




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\o Station 



The Bell Telephone Company of Pennsylvania 



No. 27 



I 



LA VIE COLLEGIENNE, THURSDAY, APRIL 4, 1935 



PAGE THREE 



Lincoln U. Swamps 
Valley Debaters 

NEW JUDGING SYSTEM 



Morrow and Riley, Forceful Op- 
ponents, Show Mastery In 
Debating- Technique 



The inter-collegiate debating question 
of the season was discussed for the last 
time on our campus on April 2 when our 
men's affirmative team met the negative 
team of Lincoln University in the final 
debate of the year. The gentlemen from 
Lincoln University were Mr. E. Boyd 
Morrow and Mr. C. A. Riley, while Mr. 
Reber and Mr. Hostetter spoke for Leba- 
non Valley. 

There was an unusually large attend- 
ance at this debate, for the meeting with 
Lincoln University is always looked for- 
ward to as perhaps the most interesting 
debate of the season. The audience was 
not disappointed, for it was a real Ore- 
gon debate. There was the usual persis- 
tent questioning and sly answering and 
the usual fight for the right to talk. 

An experiment in judging the debate 
was carried out. Each member of the 
audience voted before the debate on the 
merits of the question. After the debate 
each person then put down his opinion 
on the question. One point was given to 
each team for each change to their side 
of the question. In the beginning' the neg- 
ative had six votes; the affirmative twen- 
ty-three. The debate completely reversed 
the opinion of the group. After the de- 
bate the negative votes amounted to 
twenty-seven while the affirmative re- 
tained only three of its votes. 



DR. POOLEY GIVES 

ADDRESS AT CHAPEL 



(Continued from Page One) 



years should be filled with a spirit of in- 
tellectual freedom. Although this seems 
to be an idealistic viewpoint, Dr. Pooley 
thinks the theory might be carried out in 

practise. 

During the next hour Dr. Struble 
turned his Chaucer class over to Dr. 
Pooley, who has been interested in mid- 
dle English since his graduate work. Up 
to the present time he has published a 
translation into modern English of many 
of Chaucer's writings for high school 
usage. The lecture included many of the 
professor's problems in his work such as 
the riming couplet, the limited vocabu- 
lary possibilities, and the many difficult 
words to rhyme. He presented a contrast- 
ing translation by Dr. Leonard in order 
to point out the latter's smooth ane prac- 
tical style. Various Canterbui y pilgrims 
were described through the medium of 
this modern translation. The period 
proved to be a very interestinq and in- 
lomiaiive one for the entire c!-iss. 



Hedgerow Players 
Present O'Neill Play 

LEBANON HIGH SCHOOL 



Excellent Acting of Difficult 
And Morbid Character 
Roles 



PAGEANT THEME 

CHOSEN FOR MAY DAY 



(Continued from Page One) 



Hearts makes her tarts. They are stolen 
by the knave who is caught by the king 
and beaten full sore. During the test of 
the dream King Cole and the Queen of 
Hearts hold court and are entertained by 
the Mother Goose folk. 

Mother Goose and family leave the 
t!i r one and take a place to the side. 
There are also Miss MufFets, a wolf, the 
three pigs, flowers, Bo Peeps, woman in 
the shoe and her children, and a spirit of 
perfume. They all perform in Alice's 
dream and finally move off while Alice 
is still asleep. Again the sandman comes 
and does his dance, awakening Alice. 
Alice inspects the changed scene, then 
rubbing her eyes in a bewildered way she 
takes her book and returns to her home. 



as a time for internal development not to 
be measured in the terms of dollars and 
cents. For business descends upon youth's 
shoulders soon enough, and these first 



Agnes — It's about time you part your 
hair in the middle. 
Baney— Why? 

Agnuts— Put an alley in that b'ock. 



Anyone who is familiar with Eugene 
O'Neill's plays can realize the difficulty 
that any cast faces in attempting to pre- 
sent a play such as he writes and make 
an audience appreciate it. The Hedgerow 
Players on Monday night presented "Be- 
yond the Horizon," a Pulitzer Prize play 
by Eugene O'Neill, one of the most mor- 
bid and most disillusioning plays which 
he has written. Except for a few evident 
weaknesses in some of the characters, the 
cast as a whole did very well in main- 
taining the general theme of disappoint- 
ment and dissatisfaction with life as it 
chanced to present itself to them. 

Each character in the play is obsessed 
by his desire for what he can never have 
— for what lies "beyond the horizon." 
Robert Mayo is a victim of his dreams. 
As he is about to embark on a long sea 
voyage with his uncle, he finds that the 
girl who, he thought, loved his brother, 
loves him instead. Under the spell of his 
"poetry talk," the girl accepts Robert, 
and Andrew, his brother, feels that he 
must sail away from home. Ill and dis- 
illusioned, in time Robert fails in his ef- 
forts to make a go of the New England 
farm and loses his wife's love and respect. 
She realizes too late that it was Andy 
whom she loved, the man who has gone 
out into the world to make a fortune. 
Andrew returns in time to have his dying 
brother ask him to marry his own wife 
and seek with her the happiness which 
they have all lost. Thus the play closes 
with just a faint tone of hope. 

Harry Sheppard as James Mayo, the 
old father, did an excellent piece of act- 
ing, while Tony Bickley delighted every- 
one with his extremely natural presenta- 
tion of the old sea-faring captain, Dick 
Scott. Miriam Phillips, who can be re- 



membered as the solicitous Aunt Isabel of 
the "Inheritors," displayed an absolute 
change of character as Robert's invalid 
mother-in-law, Mrs. Atkins, a nagging, 
bitter old woman. Mabel Sheppard, as 
Mrs. Mayo, was not so outstanding as 
she was in the part of grandmother Nor- 
ton in "Inheritors," nor was Catharine 
Ricscr, who took the part of Ruth Atkins. 
Fred Nofer, as Robert, did very well in 
portraying the temperamental dreamer. 
The other members of the cast were: An- 
drew, Walter Williams; Ben, David Met- 
calf; Dr. Fawcett, Sol Jacobson. The 
play was presented in the Lebanon High 
School under the auspices of the Lebanon 
City Teachers Association. 



VESPER SERVICE 



Warren I. Brubaker, M. D., has been 
secured as the speaker for the Y. M. C. 
A. vesper service to be held in the "Y" 
room of the men's dormitory next Sun- 
day evening at 5:45 P. M. His topic will 
be "Socialized Medicine." As Dr. Bru- 
baker is a competent physician well 
known in this community, he is sure to 
have a message of great interest and 
value to the local Y. M. C. A. 

David Shroyer, a popular alumnus of 
Lebanon Valley College, will provide the 
music for the evening. 



CHILDREN OF THE 
MOON CHOSEN FOR 

CLIO - PHILO PLAY 

(Continued from Page One) 



Jane's attempts to gain happiness. Judge 
Atherton, Jane's grandfather, shows 
marked signs of the power that the moon 
possesses over human beings. Dr. Weth- 
erell, the family doctor, joins forces with 
Madame in desiring a happy marriage 
for Jane. Walter Higgs, Bannister's me- 
chanic, and Thomas, the partially deaf 
and blind butler, contribute to the plot. 

The cast is as follows: Judge Ather- 
ton, Allen Steffy; Madame Atherton, 
Mary Zartman; Jane Atherton, Louise 
Stoner; Laura Atherton, Jean McKeag; 
Dr. Wetherell, Kenneth Sheaffer; Major 
Bannister, Lester Krone; Walter Higgs, 
William Earnest; Thomas, Clyde Magee. 



PHYSIOLOGY 



. THE HEART IS PART OF THE CIRCULATORY 
SYSTEM , AND PULSATES ABOUT SEVENTY 
TIMES PER MIN UTE IN THE AVERAGE MAN 
/^"XlAND IMPARTS PRESSURE TO 
THE BLOOD, ~ 




THE BRAIN AND THE SPINAL CORD FORM THE 
CENTRAL NERVOUS SYSTEM — THE CEREBRUM 
IS THE SEAT OF INTELLIGENCE AND 
I CONSCIOUS SENSATIO NS y J* „ 

>/ 7^''V 



THE SUPPORTING PART OF THE BODY IS THE 
SKELETON. WHICH C0N5IST5 OF TW/O PARTS 
THE AXIAL AND THE APPENDICULAR—^ 



TOBACCOLOCY 



THE MAIN THING IS TO SMOKE 
IPRJNCE ALBERT — YOU CANT 
* BEAT iT FOR. MILDNE55, 
COOLNESS, AND 



FLAVOR. / 



M - M - M 

TY / — 





hiki Albert 



j 



PAGE FOUR 



LA VIE COLLEGIENNE, THURSDAY, APRIL 4, 1935 




M m m m m m ! 
BREAKFAST 
Toasted Raisin Bread 
and 
Coffee 



THE PENNWAY 



Negro Discussed By 
Chas. H. Crampton 
At Sociology Class 

TRAINER AT WM. PENN 



Shows Real Insight Into Racial 
Problem As He Under- 
stands It 



To say that the opportunities afforded 
here at school are not many and unique 
would be to assume a disposition thor- 
oughly oblivious to the numerous rare oc- 
casions such as that of last Wednesday, 
March 27. It was the privilege of Prof. 
Gingrich's sociology class to have as its 
guest speaker Dr. Charles H.D Cramp- 
ton, one of Harrisburg's leading philan- 
thropists. 

Although a member of the colored race, 
he has demonstrated very clearly to his 
community that his race, too, if given a 
fair and equal chance, can prove itself a 
worthy group of citizens whose contri- 
butions to society are manifold. 

A graduate of the University of Penn- 
sylvania, he has won for himself a large 
circle of warm friends, due to his out- 
standing work as physician for the Wil- 
liam Penn High School of Harrisburg, 
as a member of the State Medical Board, 
and as president of the Colored Y. M. C. 
A. of Harrisburg. 

His pleasing personality and his jovial 
nature immediately breached the barrier 
that supposedly exists between the white 
and colored races and caused all to drink 
with eagerness the clever but true state- 
ments he had to make. 

Dr. Crampton was guided along in his 
address by Charles Bartolet, at whose 
suggestion he came to L. V. C. As a be- 
ginning, he pictured for us the importa- 
tion of the first negro slaves from Africa 
and their development from that early 
period up until the present time. One of 
the most impressive statements made was 
that even at that very early date the ne- 
groes held no rancor in their hearts for 
the white race, but only kind thoughts, a 
chance to better themselves, and an in- 
satiable desire to be strong friends with 
these people who brought them to the 
"land of opportunity." 

As he reviewed the Civil War period, 
one of the most beautiful thoughts ex- 
pressed was that portraying a typical 
southern home during the war. Every 
man and young boy of age was away 
fighting for the cause of the South, and 
every woman and young child was left 
at home under the care of the negro 
slaves. There is not one record in history 
of any attack upon these Southern wom- 
en, of any maltreatment of them; nothing 
but praise for their kind protection and 
their able provision of food and clothing 
for their mistresses. 

In regards to crime, statistics show that 
it is decidedly not the negro who special- 
izes in major crimes. In a most clever 
and characteristic manner, Dr. Crampton 
showed that if on one side a negro had 



the privilege of robbing a bank and on 
the other that of stealing two chickens, he 
would invariably decide in favor of the 
latter. 

With reference to the lynchings that 
are mentioned in the newspapers daily, in 
nine cases out of ten, if an equitable trial 
would be given to the negroes, they 
would be proved innocent. Many times 
they die for the offense of another be- 
cause of racial prejudice. A most pathe- 
tic incident, true by the way, was re- 
lated concerning four young colored 
boys, all innocent, the youngest of whom 
was 1 1 , who were convicted for attacking 
a white woman. Without investigation, 
these young boys were imprisoned in a 
horrible, dank, musty dungeon, shackled 
to irons, deprived of food, tortured, and 
now are blind. Is it not a strong chal- 
lenge to true Americans to try to do 
something to alleviate these dreadful cir- 
cumstances? 

Throughout his entire speech, it was 
evident that he honestly knew both sides 
of the story and his sense of justice 
seemed to point its accusing finger right- 
fully at us. Even at that, however, he 
said that his race will persist in following 
is through "thick and thin" in order to 
show its appreciation for the vast oppor- 
tunities that we have given them and the 
aids to their cultural development. 

With such an inspiring address as a 
forerunner, why not more of this same 
type in order to reveal to the minds of 
the present generation the conditions 
which exist that should be remedied and 
reformed? 



Marietta has been searching and 
searching for a solution to the mystery 
of her upturned bed. How did the Para- 
site wriggle into South Hall without be- 
ing seen? 



Campus Cuts 

Upper-classmen, did you notice that 
half-surprised, half-frightened look on the 
faces of the frosh at the first May Day 
practice? Well, frosh, what do you think 
of our heel, toe, one, two, three profes- 
sor? 



Wib Shroyer, we are dying to know 
what is the attraction or what is it that 
holds you down to play practice? We 
do appreciate your kind services as 
prompter with a mouthful of pipe. 



My, what charming wenches nous 
sommes— especially in the rain. The pa- 
rade from the post was anything but 
pleasing to the eye on Thursday. Femmes 
with gorgeously straight hair and water 
globules dripping from their probosci. It 
is a shame we all can't have hair that 
gets curly when it rains. Did you all no- 
tice the headgears of steel bobby-pins at 
one-thirty class? 



We have all been racking our brains 
trying to find out by the powers of elimi- 
nation who is the newly-married couple 
on the campus. 



Now Jackey, from now on please make 
your presence known when you visit the 
upper halls of the women's dormitories— 
for your own good, Jackey, don't read 
the bulletin boards. 



Did it occur to any of you yet why the 
tree has been plucked from South Hall's 
rear yard? Oh my, yes, it gives too much 
shade in the evenings, and it is too hard 
on the nerves of the governing bodies. 



Who is the dame in South Hall who 
would rather have a unicorn than two 
corns? 



Sarge. who was that mahogany com- 
plexioned, kinky-headed floozie you were 
gallivanting with over the week-end? No 
reflections on you, Kot. 



Will the composer of the new Jigger 
Board theme song please step up on the 
platform Friday morning for ner or his 
reward? The song is here printed so that 
the students may realize the talent that is 
hidden on this campus: 
When we are old and gray, dear. 
With children on our knees 
We'll teach them what a bugbear 
Old Jigger Board used to be. 
We'll tell them how they heckled us 
With sentences unfair 
And how the catty stooge's deeds, 
Were never laid bare. 



What is Trott's non-correspondence 
theorem? All we know is that it is an 
important result recently obtained by a 
Johns Hopkins mathematician. When 
pressed for more precise details, Dr. 
Schweigert refused to commit himself fur- 
ther than to state that Trott's non-corre- 
spondence theorem deals with horses. Ah 
me, just another mathematical mystery. 



The Logical Place for L. V. C. 
Students to Buy 

BOOKS & SUPPLIES 
ESBENSHADE'S 

38 N. 8th St., Lebanon, Pa. 



KREAMER BROS. 



Leonard Elec. Refrigerators 
Hoover Electric Sweepers 
Easy Electric Washers 
Gas and Coal Stoves 
Rugs and Linoleums 



Furniture - - Undertaking 



Phone J44 annville. pa. 



TOILET ARTICLES 

PATENT MEDICINES 
CIGARS - CIGARETTES 

ANDREW'S 
CUT RATE STORE 

OPPOSITE COURT HOUSE 

8th & cumberland sts. 

Lebanon, Pa. 
VISIT OUR FOUNTAIN 



THE BEST PLACE TO BUY 
BOOKS, STATIONERY and 
COLLEGE SUPPLIES 

BOLLMAN'S 

628 CUMBERLAND STREET 




Try ROEMIG'S 

25< LUNCH 

DELICIOUS SUNDAES 
With That Good Home-Made 
ICE CREAM 



FOR QUALITY 

Baked Products 

PATRONIZE 

FINK'S BAKERY 

MAIN STREET 



D. L. Say lor & Son* 
CONTRACTORS 

LUMBER and COAL 
Annville, Pennsylvania 



Van Heusen Shirts 

'Cut Right . . . Fit Right' 
New Assortment of Spring 
NECKWEAR 
John Hirsh Dep't Store 



CLOTHING OF QUALITY 

J. S. BASHORE 



it 

PRINTIN&%INDING CO 

WE B£AT TffE WORLD O^WS/f ORDERS 
MAKE US PROVE /T 

LEBANON 740 WALTON 520 WASHINGTON READING 



Attend 

The 
Festival 




LEBANON VALLEY COLLEGE 



VOL. XII 



ANNVILLE, PENNSYLVANIA, THURSDAY, APRIL 11, 1935 



No. 1 



Kalo and Delphian 
Present Crothers' 
"As Husbands Go" 



SOPHISTICATED DRAMA 



Large Audience Views Joint Play 
Coached By Dr. George 
Struble 



Reviewed by DR. E. H. STEVENSON 



In spite of the inclement weather a full 
house greeted the Kalo-Delphian players 
when the curtain was drawn aside in the 
Engle Conservatory on Friday evening, 
April 5 

The play, ably directed bv Dr. Struble 
and Dr. Stonecipher, was Rachel Cro- 
thers' clever and amusing comedy, "As 
Husbands Go." In "Dodsworth" Sinclair 
Lewis has treated the theme of the weal- 
thy middle-western wife approaching the 
dangerous age and seeking fulfillment or 
escape, or whatever you choose to call it, 
in the sophisticated atmosphere of Euro- 
pean society. In his novel and play Sin- 
clair Lewis celebrates his own and Amer- 
ica's coming of age with a remorseless 
satirization of the expatriate American. 
"As Husband's Go" treats the same theme 
but in lighter vein. 

As the play opens Lucile Lingard, thir- 
ty-five, wife of Charles Lingard, and Em- 
mie Sykes, widow, forty-three, and moth- 
er of Peggy Sykes, both of Dubuque, 
Iowa, are in Paris lapping up culture 
and champagne. Emmie has found ful- 
fillment in the person of Hippolitus Lomi. 

Hippy" has no money, but he has a 
monocle. Emmie has money and craves 
a man who can achieve a monocle. This 
reviewer (somewhat out of character at 
the moment) sees in this a perfect vindi- 
cation of Adam Smith's explanation of 
f he advantages of trade. 

Lucile has found escape in the person 
(Continued on Page 3, Column 3) 



Y.M.C. A. to Sponsor 
First L. V. Dad's Day 

Since the Y. W. C. A. was so suc- 
cessful in their mothers' week-end pro- 
ject some time ago, the Y. M. C. A. 
> s going to keep pace by holding a 
v ery similar affair. This coming week- 
end has been designated as Dad's 
Week-End. Arrangements are under 
Wa y to accommodate and entertain 
tn e fathers of male students at Leba- 
non Valley College. Bob Cassel, the 

* president, is arranging a baseball 
9ame to be played between the fathers 
and the sons on Saturday morning. In 
'he afternoon the dads will be enter- 
tained by the men's glee club, which 
Professor Rutledge is organizing. On 
Saturday evening at six o'clock there 
^ill be a father and son banquet in 
*he college dining hall, after which the 
dads will be entertained at a social to 
^ held in the "Y" room of the men's 
dormitory. 



Schmuck Conducts 
"Y" Prayer Service 



The regular student prayer service 
was held Wednesday night, April 3, 
in Philo hall. Miller Schmuck, who is 
the prayer meeting chairman of the Y. 
M. C. A. cabinet, conducted the serv- 
ice. After some hymns were sung and 
a portion of Scripture read John Loos 
played a trumpet solo entitled "Open 
thq Gates of the Temple." The piano 
accompaniment was played by Miss 
Helen Summy. The talk of the eve- 
ning was delivered by Robert Cassel, 
class of '36. He chose as his topic 
"Belief in God in a World of Science." 



Kalo Dinner-Dance 
At General Sutter 
Brilliant Success 



MANY ATTEND AFFAIR 



Bowman's Orchestra Supplies 
Music As Kalos Cele- 
brate 



Soft, delightfully played music, beau- 
tiful girls charmingly gowned, tuxedoed 
swains and an appetizingly prepared din- 
ner spelled Kalo last Saturday night. This 
vear's dinner-dance at the General Sutter 
hotel in Lititz will be a long-remembered 
event by all who attended it. 

Ira Bowman's orchestra lived up to its 
reputation by supplying ideal music with 
compositions which satisfied all tastes. 
They were as good if not better than 
any which has appeared on our campus. 
Eleven pieces and a one-man circus kept 
the dance floor filled to capacity all eve- 
ning. 

The surroundings were ne plus ultra, 
for the occasion. Five long banquet ta- 
bles ran the length of the hall. Even these 
accommodations did not prove too ample 
but just took care of the largest group to 
attend any of the recent dinner-dances. 
The comfortable lobby and lounge rooms 
provided an added attraction which gave 
the affair an atmosphere of soft, lanquid 
sophistication. 

The favors, traveling manicure sets, 
made up in leather with the Kalo Greek 
letters impressed upon them were given 
to the girls at the beginning of the meal. 
This presentation of the favors was mere- 
ly one of the high spots of the evening. 

Several Kalo faculty members attended 
the dance. Among the faculty members 
to grace the affair were: Prof. M. L. 
Stokes. Prof. E. P. Rutledge, Dr. H. M. 
Stonecipher, Mr. P. L. Clements, and 
Dr. G. E. Schweigert. 

This year s dance has set a new high 
mark of perfection for future Kalo Anni- 
versary committees to shoot at. If they 
can but equal the accomplishment the 
campus will be able to look forward to 
other perfect dinner-dances in the coming 
(Continued on Page 3, Column 2) 



Albright President 
Visits L. V. Campus 

GIVES INSPIRING ADDRESS 



Dr. Klein Guest of Honor At 
Fellowship Dinner In 
Dining Hall 



Sunday evening, March 31, Lebanon 
Valley was honored by a visit of Dr. 
Klein, the president of Albright College. 
Students, the faculty and their wives 
gathered in the dining hall at a fellow- 
ship dinner to listen to an address by Dr. 
Klein. 

The speaker was introduced by Robert 
Cassel, president of the Y. M. C. A., 
and gave an inspiring address, the theme 
of which was a vision of hope for youth. 
Youth, according to Dr. Klein, is ever go- 
ing onward and. upward. He gave nu- 
merous illustrations from his, wide travels 
and predicted generously a great future 
for Lebanon Valley. 

This visit from the president of Al- 
bright to the L. V. C. campus is signifi- 
cant as it demonstrates the healthy spirit 
and good feeling which is growing up in 
recent years between the two rival insti- 
tutions as a result of the activities of the 
student government associations and the 
official authorities of the two schools. It 
(Continued on Page 4, Column 3) 



MUSIC TREAT 

THIS FRIDAY 



The third annual Music Festival will 
be presented by the Glee Club and band 
of Lebanon Valley College, under the di- 
rection of Professor Rutledge, on April 
12. The Glee Club will give its program 
at 4:00 P. M. 

I. Invocation of Orpheis, Peri; Liebe- 
straum, Liszt; The Heavens Resound, 
Beethoven; Glee Club. 

II. Nocturne, Curran; White Horses 
of the Sea, Warren; Dale Roth, tenor. 

III. Neapolitan Nights, Zamecnik; Las- 
sie O' Mine, Walt; Song of the Fisher- 
Boats, St. Clair; cornet quartet, Earl lin- 
ger, Cecil Oyler, Henry Steiner, William 
Black. 

IV. Lost in the Night, Christiansen; 
Winter and Spring, Borowski; Beautiful 
Savior, Christiansen; Bethlehem Night, 
Warrell; Glee Club. 

V. Concerto for violin and piano, 1st 
Movement, Mendelssohn; Martha Elser, 
violin: Oliver K. Spangler, piano. 

VI. Joshua Fit De Battle ob Jericho, 
Gaul; It's Me, O Lord, Cain; Shortnin' 
Bread, Wolfe; Glee Club. 

VII. Serenade, Titl; Anthony Jagne- 
sak, flute; Homer Barthold, clarinet. 

VIII. March of the Wooden Soldiers, 
Tschaikowsky; Ave Verum, Mozart; 
Will-O-the-Wisp, Dont; violin quartet, 
Martha Elser, Oleta Dietrich, Russell 
Hatz, Margaret Paige. 

IX. A-Hunting We Will Go, Kountz; 
The Bubble, Friml; The Bugle of Spring, 

(Continued on Page 2, Column 4) 



G. B. Jacobs Speaks 
To Commerce Club 

DEPARTMENT STORE HEAD 



Gives Interesting Talk to Mem- 
bers On Subject of Modern 
Retailing 



The Commerce Club was extremely 
fortunate in securing the services of Mr. 
George B. Jacobs, president of the Bon 
Ton Department Store in Lebanon, to 
speak to them in the second of a series of 
bi-monthly meetings. His topic of discus- 
sion was "Modern Retailing." 

Mr. Jacobs is a most interesting speak- 
er and related many things which the 
public takes for granted but are of great 
importance to the retailer. For instance, 
he said that the department store business 
is like a game of bridge— it is a game of 
information. The stores and the public 
are the contestants and it is up to the for- 
mer to get as much information as pos- 
sible in order to win the patronage of 
the latter. 

He further accentuated this theory 
when he said, "Customer acceptance has 
a direct bearing on the policy of a store" 
and that, if women realized the impor- 
tance of their tastes to the department 
store management, they would be thirty 
times as conceited as they are. Every 
day we see examples of this influence un- 
knowingly. These concise statements of 
Mr. Jacobs caused us to realize this to 
be true more than we had imagined pre- 
viously. 

For his outline of the metamorphosis 
of the department store, he explained the 
technical structure of the enterprise. The 
relative value of style experts and person- 
al shopping services were discussed. One 
of the most interesting things was the 
correlation between the various depart- 
ments of the store. 

(Continued on Page 4, Column 2) 



Frosh Y. W. Cabinet 
Entertains At Tea 



With much pomp and sophistication, 
the last of those delightful social teas 
of the Y. W. C. A. was held in North 
Hall parlor Thursday, April 4. Given 
in honor of the new and old cabinets, 
it served as a project of the freshman 
"Y". 

In a very pleasing manner the fresh- 
man girls served as hostesses, wander- 
ing here and there through the rows 
of tables, trying to make each guest 
comfortable. (Pardon, please, but this 
was a real teal) 

After a delightful entertainment at 
which time the group was favored by 
several vocal numbers by Rae Anna 
Reber and a piano selection by Irma 
Keiffer, the delectable morsels of fem- 
inine diet were served. When all had 
"feasted" to the point of satiety, the 
guests departed and thus ended the 
last tea of the year. 



PAGE TWO 



LA VIE COLLEGIENNE, THURSDAY, APRIL 11, 1935 



Retiring Editor-in-Chief 




HELEN FRANCES EARNEST 



Editor Earnest has written her last editorial for the LA VIE COLLEGIENNE 
and now is engrossed in putting the finishing touches to an all around college 
career. For almost four years Helen has been a leader in nearly every possible 
phase of student activity on the campus, especially in society doings and in lines 
connected with her field of English, such as dramatics and journalism. As editor of 
the LA VIE she has been outstandingly progressive. It is rumored that Helen has 
a teaching job waiting for her to fill upon graduation. We all join in congratulating 
a great girl for her success in the past and in wishing her a speedy attainment in 
the future of the great success which she surely has coming to her. 



Ha Viz (LoUegtenne 

ESTABLISHED 1925 

A weekly publication by the Under- 
graduate Students of Lebanon 
Valley College 



EDITORIAL STAFF 

David Yake, '36..„ Editor-in-Chief 

George Hiltner, '35 Associate Editor 

Richard Baus, '37 Managing Editor 



REPORTORIAL STAFF 

Catherine Wagner, '35 
Sylvia Evelev, '36 
Louise Gillan, '36 
Lester Krone, '36 
Marian Leisey, 36 
Maxine Earley, '37 

Grace Naugle, '37 General Reporters 

Ida K. Hall, '35 Conservatory 

William Earnest, '37 Athletics 

Miriam Eichner. *37 Alumni 

Louis Straub, '37 Philokosmian 

Charles Hauck, '35 Kalozetean 

Jane Shellenberger, 36 „Clionian 

Marietta Ossi, '35 Delphian 



BUSINESS STAFF 

Kenneth Sheaffer, "35......Business Manager 

Albert Anderson, '36.„Asst. Bus. Manager 

Robert Cassel, '36 Circulation Manager 

Elwood Needy, '37 Asst. Cir. Manager 



Single Copies.. . - -5 cents 

Subscription „~.$1.00 per year 



Entered at the Annville, Pa., post 
office as second class matter, under the 
Act of March 3, 1879. 



THURSDAY, APRIL 11, 1935 



RECONSTRUCTION 

Verily, the machinery of state is slow! 
Although we had hoped to have the new 
La Vie staff functioning on this issue it 
was an impossible hope because of the 
necessary red tape that has to be gone 
through before a new staff is officially 
appointed and approved. It has been 
customary for the new editor on his first 
issue to have the assistance of the retir- 
ing staff and to have the new staff in- 
stalled for the second issue. This prac- 
tice is being followed this year. 

The La Vie in the past has had its ups 
and downs but it still breezes along mer- 
rily, striving hard to make up in quality 
what it lacks in volume. Of course, with 
the enthusiasm of the uninitiated we have 
high sounding and impractical ideas, per- 
haps, of the methods we will use in main- 
taining the high standards of the issues 
behind us and of ways in which we might 
improve a point here and there, but we'll 
save these for the next issue as a kind 
of declaration of aims for the incoming 
staff. 

For the present may we say that the 
policy of this paper has always been to 
welcome all criticism that might be of- 
fered and that this policy will be contin- 
ued in the future. We realize that the 
average reader is not aware of the tech- 
nical, financial, and editorial difficulty 
that stands in the way of any staff of any 
publication. But we of the staff can "take 
it." Unwarranted criticism bothers us not 
a whit and really intelligent criticism is 
given attention and helps a great deal in 
determining our policies. 

In closing may we add just a few lines 
of congratulations to the retiring editor 
and staff who have finished their work 
and have left a job well done. The edi- 
torial problems encountered during the 
past term have been just a little more 
serious than usual and have in all in- 
stances been dealt with efficiently and in 
a manner that well warrants our admira- 
tion and respect. To the retiring staff, 
then, our most hearty and sincere con- 
gratulations. 



Other Colleges 



In a recent lecture addressed to the 
Drexel Cultural Society, Professor Fran- 
cis A. Brown, former instructor at M. I. 
T., stated that high marks are no indica* 
tion of true ability. Professor Brown 
supported his tenet by citing several ex- 
periments he had performed on students 
at M. I .T. He gave a series of practical 
problems to one of his classes in chem- 
istry, problems such as any industrialist 
might have to face, and the results 
proved to his satisfaction that the most 
practical men were not those who re- 
ceived the "A's" but rather the "B" and 
"C" students. He pointed out, moreover, 
that frequently the under-classmen are 
more practical-minded than the seniors 
or juniors. 

"High marks," said Mr. Brown, "might 
be the result of several factors," among 
which he lists the following: an excellent 
memory, ability to cram, bluff, showing 
unusual interest in the course, outside 
help, etc. Mr. Brown also found that 
low marks might be the result of outside 
influences, lack of interest, a heavy 
ichedule, nervousness at exams, inability 
to cram, poor memory, etc. The speak- 
er, however, does not maintain that "A" 
students will not succeed, but adds that 
he believes an "A" student with a prac- 
tical mind would probably turn out to be 
a genius. 



The faculty of Lehigh University rose 
to its heights of authoritative dominance 
recently when it suspended indefinitely a 
student publication, the Burr, for over- 
stepping the limits of decency in its Feb- 
ruary issue, "Keep Sex Out of It." Li- 
quidation of the financial affairs of the 
Burr was entrusted to the Board of Pub- 
lications. The Burr, which is Lehigh's 
comic magazine, was originally a news- 
paper edited for strictly literary purposes, 
but after the Brown and White, the pres- 
ent Lehigh publication, had been started, 
the Burr gave itself to the comic aspect! 
On several occasions previous to its re- 
cent suspension, members of the editorial 
staff had been warned against the vul- 
garity which they employed, but in more 
recent years the Burr had been compara- 



tively free from criticism. 

In a certain college in Kentucky it is 
reported that all the young man has to 
do is call at his "date's" home, get the 
keys of her father's Dusenberg, and drive 
the girl to the place of entertainment in 
style. Upon arriving at the scene of ac- 
tion the young lady opens her purse and 
slips you the ticket to the dance. To add 
to the Paradise, you only have to dance 
the opening number with your date. The 
rest of the evening is spent in being cut 
in on, or in cutting in. 



MUSICAL FESTIVAL 

THIS FRIDAY 

(Continued from Page One) 



Pitcher, Glee Club. Sara Light, accom- 
panist. 

In the evening the band program will 
be given at 7:30. Many unusual things 
will be heard. The program: 

March, Boston Commandery, Carter- 
selection, He Wanted Adventure, Waller- 
Tunbridge; cornet solo, Rock of Ages, 
Barnhouse; Earl Unger. 

Novelty, Comin' Round the Mountain, 
Fillmore. Tenor solos, Kashmiri Song, 
Lehmann; The Old Road, Scott; Stuart 
Goodman. 

Sacred selection, Joy to the World, 
Barnhouse; xylophone solo, Raymond 
Overture, Thomas; Emily Kindt. 

Modern Rhapsody, Headlines, Colby. 

Following this concert a reception and 
dance will be held in the gymnasium. Re- 
freshments will be on sale, the proceeds 
of which will be added to the girls' band 
uniform fund. The 40-cent ticket will ad- 
mit one to both concerts and will admit 
a couple to the reception. The 25-cent 
ticket will admit one to either concert or 
will admit a couple to the reception. 
Many invitations have been sent out and 
an unusually large audience is expected. 
This is one of the most outstanding events 
of our college year— don't miss it. 

The first spring recital will be given 
Tuesday evening. We have been eager- 
ly awaiting this series of recitals and ex- 
pect to hear some very delightful pro- 
grams. Those participating in this re- 
cital are: Sara Light, organ; Robert 
Sausser and Jack Schuler, violin; and 
Myrle Deaven, piano. 

The Lebanon Valley concert band gave 
a program on Tuesday evening at the 
Fourth United Brethren Church in York, 
Penna. 



SAINT JOHNSBURY ACADEMY 

Saint Johnsbury, Vermont 

An Old New England Academy in an Old New England Town. Thorough 
preparation for college. Commercial courses. Dormitories for boys and girls. 
Tuition $550 covers all expenses. Scholarship aid for worthy boys and girls. 
WRITE PRINCIPAL STANLEY R. OLDHAM. L. V C. 08 



it's at least 
worth trying! 

What, no funds? That's 
surely a reason to tele- 
phone home. A few ehoice 
words in the family ear 
may ease the situation. 

(Yes, it can be done — 
even when "broke". Just 
ask the operator to re- 
verse the charges.) 



The Bell Telephone Company of Pennsylvania 



No. 6 



LA VIE COLLEGIENNE, THURSDAY, APRIL 11, 1935 



PAGE THREE 



Sport Shots 

Lebanon Valley's spring sports activi- 
ties get under way at the close of this 
month, and the month of May will be a 
busy one for Blue and White athletes. 



court teams in the brief history of tennis 
at L. V. C. 



The eleven-game baseball schedule 
opens with a contest with Dickinson at 
Carlisle on Saturday, April 27. The ten- 
nis season inaugural is scheduled for 
Monday, April 29, when the L. V. court- 
sters will cross racquets with Elizabeth- 
town College on the home courts. 



With an unusually large number of 
veterans in the baseball squad, and a par- 
ticularly strong pitching staff, the dia- 
mond sport should enjoy one of its best 
years. Six of the eleven games arranged 
for the Blue and White nine are league 
games. The league will in all probability 
he composed of the same colleges as it 
was last year, including the champion Al- 
bright Lions, Juniata, Ursinus, Drexel, 
Bucknell, and Gettysburg. Last year the 
Valley baseballers lost three games and 
won six, but the defeats were all dealt 
out by league opponents. 



The tennis schedule: 
Monday, April 29— Elizabethtown, Home 
Wednesday, May 1— Dickinson, Away 
Friday, May 3— F. and M., Home 
Saturday, May 4— Catawba, Home 
Monday, May 6— St. Joseph's, Away 
Wednesday, May 8— Juniata, Home 
Friday, May 10— Bucknell, Away 
Wednesday, May 15— Moravian, Away 
Saturday, May 18— Ursinus, Away 
Saturday, May 25— Muhlenberg, Home 
Thursday, May 30— Albright, Home 
Saturday, June 8— Alumni, Home. 



Twelve engagements have been sched- 
uled for Lebanon Valley's exponents of 
the racquet game. This will be one less 
contest! than last year's courtsters played, 
but a new arrangement has made it pos- 
sible to include five new opponents on the 
lists. Instead of playing one home and 
one away match with each foe, two-year 
arrangements have been made so that 
each opponent will be met only once a 
year, alternating yearly at home or away. 
Colleges to appear on the L. V. schedule 
for the first time include Franklin and 
Marshall, Catawba, Bucknell, Ursinus, 
and Muhlenberg. 



All of last year's court team except 
Fred Lehman are back again this year. 
Donmoyer, Nye, Walborn, Ax, and 
Shroyer are all available for service. This 
aggregation, veterans of a team that won 
nine and lost but four matches, should 
form the heart of one of the strongest 



The baseball schedule, with results of 
last year's games: 

Saturday, April 27— Dickinson, Away 
Tuesday, April 30— Penn State, Away 
'Wednesday, May 1— Juniata, Away, 6-1 
'Saturday, May 4— Albright, Home (ten- 
tative), 0-5 
Wednesday, May 8 — Susquehanna, 

Away, 9-7 
'Friday, May 10— Ursinus, Home 
'Wednesday, May 15— Drexel, Away 
Thursday, May 16— Susquehanna, Home, 
7-0 

Wednesday, May 22— Albright, Away, 
4-2 

'Saturday, May 25— Bucknell, Away, 
6-7 

'Saturday. June 1 —Gettysburg, Home. 
6-12. 

( * ) Denotes league games. 



KALO AND DELPHIAN 

PRESENT JOINT PLAY 



[Continued from Page One) 



KALO DINNER-DANCE 

BRILLIANT SUCCESS 



(Continued from Page One) 



years. To the present seniors who have 
devoted their time and abilities to the so- 
ciety for the past four years this dance 
w;r; a grand finale for their life as active 
members of Kappa Lambda Sigma. They 
cannot keep a trace of wistfulness, a 
touch of sadness out of their thoughts 
when they realize that it was 'heir last 
anniversary. The rest of the members are 
also sorry to see it pass on but they mark 
time until next year. 



of Ronald Derbyshire, a very young 
English poet, whose spark of genius is 
fanned to a warm glow by Lucile's beau- 
ty, charm and romantic nature. This is 
serious, and Adam Smith does not help us 
here. Lucile is loath to hurt her tender 
and devoted husband, but she cannot en- 
dure the thought of returning to Dubuque. 
Paris and Ronald have made her live. She 
agrees to obtain her release from Charles 
and to marry Ronald. 

The Paris scene is a prologue to the 
action which takes place in the Lingard 
establishment in Dubuque. Act I reveals 
Charles, the doting husband of Lucile, 
pacing the floor in anticipation of his 
wife's return. At length she arrives and 
with her come Emmie and Hippy. 

With some difficulty Peggy is won over 
to the idea of having Hippy in the family. 
She comes to realize that he is a regular 
fellow in spite of his accent, his monocle, 
and a sense of values different from any 
she has encountered in the corn belt. She 
asks him whether he would marry her 
mother if she had no money, and is tem- 
porarily floored by his reply, "Certainly 
not!" 

But Lucile can not seem to get around 
to telling poor old Charles, and when 
Ronald turns up two weeks later to claim 
her, the family is at first under the im- 
pression that he is another suitor of Em- 
mie's. Jake, Betty's bucolic beau, seems 
first among the homefolks to have pene- 
trated the mystery of Ronald. Very subt- 
ly it is revealed that Charles likewise has 
come to understand the situation. He 
takes Ronald off fishing. They develop 
a warm admiration for each other, and 
during the evening, mellowed with Scotch 
and soda, Ronald reaches a decision. The 
greatness of Charlie's love for Lucile is 
too fine a thing to sacrifice. He writes 
her a letter of farewell and departs. 

Compared with Dodsworth this play 
is a slight thing. Lacking its searching 
and profound analysis of character and 
philosophically less satisfying than Sin- 



clair Lewis' work, it is none the less good 
drama, deftly put together, and convin- 
cing enough in the key in which it is 
pitched. 

The performance of the play was quite 
up to the high standard we have learned 
to expect ofLebanon Valley College dra- 
matics. Catherine Wagner portrayed ex- 
cellently the part of Lucile, and Marietta 
Ossi as Emmie Sykes seemed perfectly 
cast, interpreting the part magnificently. 
Charles Hauck as Hippy managed his 
foreign accent and monocle with profes- 
sional assurance, and brought out the es- 
sentially strong features of the character 
as well as the comedy. Wilbur Leech as 
Ronald gave a smooth performance 
throughout, but was best in the last scene 
in which he became increasingly inebri- 
ated at just the right tempo to achieve 
verisimilitude. Charles Kinney as Lucile's 
husband had the heaviest and most diffi- 
cult role to interpret, and he handled it 
very capably. A little more variety in 
mood and tone of voice would perhaps 
have strengthened his characterization, 
but he was always perfectly in character. 
Emma Mary Smyser as Peggy seemed to 
this reviewer to possess outstanding tal- 
ent for comic roles, and Greta Heiland 
was very good as Katie. Paul Hershey 
as the boorish lover of Peggy furnished 
good comedy. David Byerly, Duey Un- 
ger, Richard Huber, and Claire Adams 
acted well the minor parts assigned to 
them. 

The audience was appreciative and 
seemed to enjoy the play, but is it not 
about time we gave up chuckling when 
a boy embraces a girl properly, if not 
quite professionally, on the stage? Not 
to end on a note of carping criticism we 
wish to extend a vote of thanks for the 
stage settings, arranged, we infer from 
the program, by Harold Philips and to 
the players and directors a cordial vote 
of appreciation for an enjoyable evening. 



Esbenshade: Hey, there, Fridinger, 
didn't you tell me you never got tired? 

Pete (doing F.E.R.A. work): Yes, 
sh! You see, I always rest before I get 
tired. 




PAGE FOUR 



LA VIE COLLEGIENNE, THURSDAY, APRIL 11, 1935 




Freshman Theme 

WHAT I KNOW ABOUT 
COWBOYS 

I have never seen a real cowboy, but 
only the kind referred to as "drugstore" 
cowboys. They are not cowboys, but 
merely loafers who spend the greater part 
of their time holding down the stools at 
a drugstore counter. They haunt drug- 
stores and similar places, are not gallant 
as cowboys should be, and they are not 
even worth noticing. 

I have read many stories and novels 
of the West. I always get a thrill out of 
"cowboy" picture shows, and when I'm 
there) I like to stamp my feet, clap, whis- 
tle, or yell with the other children. It's 
all rather melodramatic. I hold my breath 
when the hero is in the clutches of the 
dastardly villain; I thrill at the handsome, 
truly masculine appearance of the cow- 
boy hero; I loathe the villain with his 
confident swagger, his lack of honor, and 
his injustice; I, too, often dare to join in 
the hisses of the excited audience; and 
when the hero at last captures the vil- 
lain and wins the love of the fair maiden, 
I have to clap with the rest. But they 
are all the same; the heroine has always 
been captured, tied, bound, and is being 
guarded in a mountain shack, or perhaps 
she is clinging to a shrub on the side of a 
cliff; the shrub is breaking loose from the 
earth of the cliff, the heroine has fainted, 
but she does not fall. Enter the hero! 
She is saved and they live happily ever 
after. 

Cowboys are usually pictured as being 
tall and muscular, broad-shouldered, with 
dark, unruly hair, firm chiseled features, 
and wearing flapping pants usually 
rather fancy, plaid shirts, big, broad- 
brimmed hats, and kerchiefs knotted 
around their throat. I don't know whe- 
ther such men exist. They are so pictur- 
esque, handsome, and strong, there could 
not be many. Tom Mix and Buck Jones 
are like them. 

Then there is that group of tobacco- 
chewing, singing, cussing, happy-go-lucky 
cowboys. They are rather homely, one 
is always very tall and slim, the other 
short and stumpy. They answer to the 
characteristic names Slim and Pee- Wee. 
Slim is always with Pee-Wee, Pee-Wee 
with Slim. They quarrel with each other, 
but really they are firm friends. They, 
too, wear flapping pants, boots with long 
spurs, checkered shirts, kerchiefs around 
their necks, and broad-brimmed hats. But 
they are usually bow-legged. Maybe be- 
cause they do the work, while the hero 
protects the fair maiden from the villain, 
scheming to seize her ranch on which oil 
has just been struck. 

Cowboys are romantic figures. Their 
ballads are part of our national amuse- 
ment. "The Last Roundup" swept the 
the country with its appeal to our adven- 
turous, melodramatic nature. Cowboys 
are gods to most children, who are 
brought up playing cowboys and Indians. 
A small child, roaming the fields in a ty- 
pical cowboy garb with a pistol in his 
belt, is aroused to search for "Bandit 



M m m m m m ! 
BREAKFAST 
Toasted Raisin Bread 
and 
Coffee 



Four-Eyed Pete" or "Big Chief Running 
Water." The reward will be five hundred 
dollars for the capture of the villain, dead 
or alive. 

That's my experience with cowboys. 
I know little about the real cowboy, but 
the fictitious one always appeals to me. 

WANDA PRICE. 



Campus Cuts 



Did you hear Emma Mary's enlight- 
ening version of "Mrs. Wiggs of the 
Cabbage Patih"? Anyway, she informs 
us that Mrs. Wiggs had a passion for 
geography as well as her husband. May- 
be it's ambiguity. 



And then there was the time Gayle 
cleaned behind her dresser and found a 
double socket for her lamps after two 
years' residence in the same room. There's 
one for Ripley— think what she may be 
able to find in a decade. Nothing slow 
about her. 



Maybe Mrs. Wallace didn't think any- 
thing about it the other night when she 
said to Cappy, "Demi tasse?". Cappy re- 
torted, "Oh, no, thanks, I never drink 
more than half a cup." Maybe the Greeks 
had a word for it. 



Then there was the two cents that 
some junior put in the collection box 
when he went to hear the Glee Club. 



Didn't you think it was the cutest thing 
the way Moser displayed his rhythmical 
manipulations at the Saturday night af- 
fair? 



It's a wonder Palatini hasn't told you 
the story about the time he said "I have 
went" instead of "I have gone." His 
teacher made him write the correct form 
on the board twenty times. Meanwhile, 
she went out of the room and when she 
came back, found on the board this: "I 
have wrote I have gone twenty times 
and now I have went." 

G. B. JACOBS SPEAKS 

AT COMMERCIAL CLUB 

(Continued from Page One) 



After his talk, the meeting was thrown 
open to general discussion. It was during 
this time that he pointed out *he advan- 
tages of cooperative buying, chain store 
competition, and the opportunity for col- 
lege graduates in the retail field. It was 
most heartening to the seniors especially, 
when he said there was as much oppor- 
tunity in the craft as there ever had been. 

The Commerce Club is very indebted 
to Mr. Jacobs fon his services throughout 
the evening. It also wishes to express its 



Goodman Brothers 

SODA FOUNTAIN 



gratitude to Mr. Stuart Goodman who, 
at the opening of the meeting, sang that 
beautiful song of Joyce Kilmer's, "Trees." 

At the close of the evening, refresh- 
ments were served and every one left 
with the sentiment that it had been a most 
successful meeting. We are looking for- 
ward to the next meeting on April 15 
when we shall again have a well-known 
business man speak to us. 



ALBRIGHT PRESIDENT 

VISITS L. V. CAMPUS 



(Continued from Page One) 

also demonstrates that if we do have to 
be rivals we can be friendly rivals and 
gentlemen about it. 

Last June Dr. Klein was awarded the 
honorary degree of Doctor of Law at the 
Lebanon Valley commencement exercises. 



Advice on how to handle women ranks 
foremost among the futilities. 

Hobby^I paid a hundred dollars for 
that dog. He's part collie and part bull. 

Galen— Which part is bull? 

Hobby— That part about the hundred 
dn'iars. 



Dr. Bender: I would like to have the 
formula for phenylisothiocyanate. 

Hemperly: Do you mean mustard oil? 

Prof: Oh yes. I can never think of 
that name. 



No wonder there's a lot of krowlc jge 
in the colleges— the freshmen always 
bring a little in and the seniors never take 
any away. 



Louise — There's something wrong with 
these hot dogs. 

Kirk — Well, don't tell me; I'm only a 
waiter, not a veterinarian. 



The Logical Place for L. V. C. 
Students to Buy 

BOOKS & SUPPLIES 
ESBENSHADE'S 

38 N. 8th St., Lebanon, Pa. 



KREAMER BROS. 



Leonard Elec. Refrigerators 
Hoover Electric Sweepers 
Easy Electric Washers 
Gas and Coal Stoves 
Rugs and Linoleums 



Furniture - - Undertaking 



Phone 144 ann villi:, pa. 



TOILET ARTICLES 

PATENT MEDICINES 
CIGARS - CIGARETTES 

ANDREW'S 
CUT RATE STORE 

OPPOSITE COURT HOUSE 

8th & cumberland st8. 

Lebanon. Pa. 
VISIT OUR FOUNTAIN 



THE BEST PLACE TO BUY 
BOOKS, STATIONERY and 
COLLEGE SUPPLIES 

BOLI,MAN\S 



628 CUMBERLAND STREET 




For Recreation, Try 



ROEMIG'S 

BILLIARDS and BOWLING 



FOR Ul AI.ITY 

Baked Products 

PATRONIZE 

FINK'S BAKERY 

MAIN STREET 



D. L. Say lor & Sons 
CONTRACTORS 

LUMBER and COAL 
Annville, Pennsylvania 



Van Heusen Shirts 

"Cut Right . . . Fit Right" 
New Assortment of Spring 
NECKWEAR 
John Hirsh Dep't Store 



CLOTHING OF QUALITY 

J. S. BASHORE 

. • « 



THE PENNWAY 



printin& x %indinc CO 

W£B£AT T/ff WORLD 0// /?(/Sff ORDERS 
MAKE US PROVE /T 

L EBANON 7 40 WALTON 520 WASHINGTON READING 1 



Weather? 
Clear On 
Saturday!!! 




"Children of 
The Moon" 
Fri. Night 



LEBANON VALLEY COLLEGE 



VOL. XII 



ANNVILLE, PENNSYLVANIA, THURSDAY, MAY 2, 1935 



No. 2 



May Day Pageant 
To Take Place On 
Campus Saturday 

COLORFUL ANNUAL EVENT 



Final Practice Will Be Held On 
Friday In Preparation 
For Festival 



Professor Shaar and Miss Kenyon 
are putting forth all possible efforts this 
last week to make this May Day surpass 
all others. The various "Y" committees, 
Professor Rutledge, and the band have 
given their time and cooperation; the fac- 
ulty and students are preparing to enter- 
tain many prospective students; the great- 
er part of the student body will have an 
active part in the May Day program. 

At 2:30 P. M. the band will lead the 
procession on the campus, followed by 
the May queen and her court. After the 
queen has been crowned, the members of 
the junior class will perform the annual 
May Pole dance. Those participating 
are: Geraldine Harkins, Louis Frank, 
Louise Gillan, Victor Fridinger, Virginia 
Britton, Richard Ax, Jane Shellenberger, 
Fred Gruber, Louise Shearer, Albert An- 
derson, Iva Claire Weirick, Robert Ed- 
wards, Rae Anna Reber, Richard Huber, 
Virginia Summers, Paul Hershey, Vir- 
ginia Goodall, Robert Spohn, Jane Show- 
ers, John Muth, Louvain Roberts, Irma 
Keiffer, Ken Eastland, Louise Bishop, 
Guy Beaver, Sara Lupton, Theodore 
Loose, Evelyn Frick, Charles Kinny, June 
Gingrich, David Yake, Mary Haddox, 
Mike Kanoff. 

The pageant proper opens with the en- 
trance of Mother Goose, Charlotte Stab- 
fey, and all the toys. Alice in Wonder- 
land, Maxine Earley, will be escorted by 
f he Sandman, Miss Kenyon, one of the 
feature dancers. Next is Old King Cole, 
Louis Straub, with his Pipe, Walter Fri- 

( Continued on Page 2, Column 2) 



Weirick Is Prayer 

Meeting Chairman 

The regular student prayer service 
was held last Wednesday night, April 
10, in Philo hall. Iva Claire Weirick, 
the prayer meeting chairman of the 
Y. W. C. A., presented the various 
participants as they appeared on the 
program. Ruth Goyne opened the 
meeting with an appropriate piano 
prelude entitled "Calvary" by Rod- 
ney. Alma Cline then read the third 
chapter of the Book of James and led 
the group in a prayer. Jane Showers, 
who is a student in the conservatory 
of music, sang a soprano solo entitled 
"Thou Wilt Keep Him in Perfect 
Peace." She was accompanied at the 
piano by Ruth Buck. The talk of the 
evening was given by Rebecca Ad- 
ams, who chose as her topic "Being 
the Best Wherever One Is." The 
meeting ended with a very impressive 
prayer circle. Miss Weirick, because 
of her enthusiastic effort, is to be com- 
mended for the exceptionally large 
number present at the service. 



Two Meetings Held 
By Commerce Club 

KISHPAUGH, HEISEY TALK 



Shenk Attends Penna. 
Historical Meeting 

°n April 19 and 20, Prof. H. H. Shenk 
tended the annual meeting of the Penn- 
sylvania Historical Association which 
^ as held at the University of Pittsburgh, 
'Ksburgh, Pennsylvania. Prof. Shenk 
as accompanied by his daughter, Lucille, 
? 9raduate of Lebanon Valley College, 
. is now head of the department of 

, ' st0l 7 in the Hershey Industrial high 
Nct iool. 

. ne Historical Association was organ- 
fQ ed in April, 1933, to supplement the ef- 
1 . S °* tne local historical societies and 
e ' r Federation, to promote scholarly ac- 
n nc j y , in fi^d °f Pennsylvania history 
S yj le teaching of that history in Penn- 
l^k nif> schools and colleges, and to stim- 
e *aJl tflC intcrest °f Pennsylvanias gen- 
y in the history of their Common- 
continued on Page 2, Column 3) 



Foreign Business and Psychol- 
ogy of Selling Were Topics 
Discussed 



The Commerce Club had one of its 
most interesting meetings of the season 
on Monday evening, April 15. Mr. W. 
M. Kishpaugh, who has been taking some 
courses in the Business Administration 
department, gave a very interesting and 
instructive talk on "The Sidelights on 
Foreign Business." 

He discredited the existing belief that 
an enterprising young man can sell any- 
thing he desires to a foreign country by 
.-.'howing that these countries are more in- 
.erested in ideas than in products. This 
is especially true in the cases of Russia 
and Japan and is becoming more so in 
die Latin American countries. 

Another matter of extreme importance 
in this trade is courtesy and friendliness. 
An example of the benefit from this policy 
he met one time at Caracas, Venezuela. 

(Continued on Page 3, Column 3) 



1936 "QUITTIE" NEWS 



The staff of the Quittapahilla pub- 
lished by the Class of 1936 announced 
today that the latest edition of the 
Lebanon Valley annual has gone to 
press and will be here in a few days 
for distribution. The new book prom- 
ises to be just a little different from 
its predecessors containing new col- 
ors, new inks, new arrangement, and 
a beautiful new cover design. Watch 
the bulletin boards for announcements. 



Derickson Presides 
At Late Meeting of 
Academy of Science 

HEADS STATE SCIENTISTS 



Drs. Light and Derickson Repre- 
sent Lebanon Valley College 
At Carlisle Meeting 



The Pennsylvania Academy of Science 
held its eleventh annual meeting April 19 
and 20, at Dickinson College. The meet- 
ing was presided over by Dr. S. H. Der- 
ickson, president of the Academy. About 
125 Pennsylvania scientists were present. 

The first annual meeting of the Junior 
Academy of Science, composed of repre- 
sentatives of high school science clubs, 
was also held with 75 members present. 
All meetings of both bodies were held in 
the Science building of Dickinson Col- 
lege. 

A preliminary business session took 
place on Thursday evening at 6:30. A 
meeting of the executive committee was 
intended by Dr. Derickson and Dr. V. 
Earl Light, assistant secretary of the 
/ody. Following this, a special commit- 
tee met for drafting proposed recom- 
mendations to the Department of Educa- 
tion for increasing the requirements of 
science teachers in secondary schools. 

The report of this committee which 
was unanimously adopted by the Acad- 
emy recommends those certified to teach 
science in secondary schools shall have 
completed a minimum of twenty-four 
semester hours in science. For teaching 
biological sciences, at least eighteen hours 
(Continued on Page 2, Column 4) 



Thespians Present 
Short Comedy Skit 
By Rachel Crothers 

McADAM, MAGEE DIRECT 



Well Acted Wig and Buckle 
Production Is Very Well 
Received 



DAD'S WEEK-END 
A BIG SUCCESS 

It was quite evident that the fathers 
who visited us during our recent Dad's 
Week-end had a thoroughly enjoyable 
time. The Y. M. C. A. is already dis- 
cussing plans to hold a similar affair 
some time next year, preferably during 
the football season so that the "dads" 
might attend a home game in company 
with their sons. 

The mush-ball game was called off on 
Saturday morning because of inclement 
weather, but the Men's Glee Club, under 
the direction of Professor Rutledge, pre- 
sented a very good concert in the after- 
noon. The father and sons banquet was 
the climax of the entire week-end. All 
the male students and the visiting fathers, 
in company with the male faculty mem- 
bers, gathered in the dining hall to par- 
ticipate in a very enjoyable program. 
Dr. H. H. Shenk was the toastmaster. 
After making a few preliminary remarks 
he introduced Robert Cassel, the Y. M. 
C. A. president, who formally welcomed 
the "dads" to the campus. Rev. P. B. 
Gibble, D. D., of Palmyra, responded 
with greetings from the fathers. Dr. G. F. 
Bierman, Ph. D., a student of other days, 

(Continued on Page 2, Column 3) 



Rachel Crothers' one-act play, "The 
Rector," was given in the chapel April 9 
by members of the Wig and Buckle Club. 
The play was directed by Sarah Katha- 
rine McAdam and Clyde Magee. 

The story has a light plot but it is pri- 
marily a character sketch. The cast 
showed exceptional ability in interpreting 
the different personalities in the story, for 
each was a distinct and unique character. 

The setting is modern and the action 
takes place in a country parsonage. The 
rector, Mr. Herresford, has called a meet- 
ing of several leading women figures of 
the parish to decide upon a floor cover- 
ing for the church. But aside from this 
business matter they are quite anxious 
to make a match for the unattached 
young rector, thinking this is altogether 
essential to complete his success. All the 
women who come are eligible except Mrs. 
Lemmingworth, but she is very anxious 
to see the rector married to Miss Trim- 
ball. The latter has been waiting for 
many years, we gather by her appear- 
ance, for the right man, and the rector is 
the man. She is tall and thin and her 
clothes are quite out of fashion, though 
she attempts to be modern and makes 
her play for the rector in no underhand 
method. She nods and wags her head in 
accord with all that Mrs. Lemmingworth 
has to say. Mr. Herresford has made his 
own selection and tries to evade this is- 
sue of marriage to Miss Trimball. Mar- 
garet Norton enters and then Mrs. Mun- 
sey. They pay their respects to the rec- 
( Continued on Page 4, Column 2) 



Interesting Meeting 

Held By Delphians 

Miss Mary March, president of Del- 
phian Literary Society, called a meeting 
on Friday, April 26, at 7:30 P. M. The 
meeting was called to order and Marietta 
Ossi was installed as vice-president. 
Claire Adams, chaplain, took charge of 
the devotions. The roll call, minutes and 
treasurer's report were read. The presi- 
dent reported the judiciary committee to 
be composed of Catherine Wagner, June 
Gingrich, Claire Adams, Romaine Stiles, 
Ethel Houtz, and Esther Flom. 

An informal business meeting was held 
and the Delphians made plans to invite 
boy friends from the campus to a hike, 
and feed, in short, an afternoon of fun 
for May 1 1 . 

An amusing program arranged by sev- 
eral sophomore girls was presented. The 
(Continued on Page 3, Column 4) 



PAGE TWO 



LA VIE COLLEGIENNE, THURSDAY, MAY 2, 1935 



Ha Viz (LolleBtenne 



ESTABLISHED 1925 



A weekly publication by the Under- 
graduate Students of Lebanon 
Valley College 



EDITORIAL STAFF 

David Yake, '36 Editor-in-Chief 

Lester Krone, '36. ....Associate Editor 

Richard Baus, '37 .. Managing Editor 

Calvin Spitler, '38 Assistant Managing Editor 



REPORTORIAL STAFF 

Louise Gillan, '36 
Marian Leisey, '36 
Maxine Earley, '37 

Grace Naugle, '37 General Reporters 

Sylvia Evelev. '36 

Robert Spohn. '36 Features 

Helen Summy, '36 Conservatory 

William Earnest, '37 Athletics 

Eleanor Lynch, '37 Faculty and Alumni 

Duey Unger, '37 Kalozetean 

June Gingrich. '36 Delphian 

Louis Straub, '37 Philokosmian 

Jane Shellenberger, '36 Clionian 



the student body's hands late Thursday 
afternoon. 

With an enthusiastic staff to work with 
and a whole year ahead of us, we can 
promise our reading public that every ef- 
fort will be expended in attaining these 
objects. 



MAY DAY PAGEANT 

THIS SATURDAY 



(Continued from Page One) 



BUSINESS STAFF 

Albert Anderson, '36 Business Manager 

Robert Kell, '37. Assistant Business Manager 

Elwood Needy, '37 Circulation Manager 

David Byerly, '38 Asst. Circulation Manager 



Single Copies 5 cents 

Subscription $1.00 per year 



Entered at the Annville, Pa., post 
office as second class matter, under the 
Act of March 3, 1879. 



THURSDAY, MAY 2, 1934 



PROSPECTUS 



In the last issue of La Vie Collegienne 
we promised an outline of the policy that 
this publication will follow during the 
coming year. It is evident that there is 
room for improvement in all phases of 
the publication and we have selected as 
a major objective several points that are 
aimed at making a better and more inter- 
esting paper. 

In the first place, we are making a 
studied attempt at improving the tech- 
nical details of the weekly. Headlines, 
makeup, and journalistic style are among 
some of the things that will receive spe- 
cial attention. The adoption of a style 
book, possibly one of our own making, 
will stimulate interest on the part of re- 
porters and should insure more pleasing 
grammatical construction from our bud- 
ding reporters for the eye of the discrimi- 
nating reader. 

Secondly, although the La Vie is a 
weekly and cannot possibly contain all 
up-to-the-minute news, we will attempt 
to heighten the news interest. Arrange- 
ments with the various college depart- 
ments for special and exclusive releases 
of important news, more interesting and 
unusual presentation of familiar though 
important news items through the use of 
columns and by searching out angles not 
generally known, more liberal use of fea- 
ture and human interest articles, reviews 
of major play productions by student re- 
porters as well as by faculty reviewers 
and student reviews of all plays, a great- 
er number of previews of important things 
that are GOING to happen, and the in- 
troduction of regular columns in the pa- 
per interestingly written by experienced 
staff members should help to make the 
publication more readable. 

Thirdly, although financial conditions 
stand in the way at present, we will make 
every effort to return to the regular large 
size paper next semester either by increas- 
ing our income from advertisements or 
from some other source. 

Fourthly, we will endeavor to make 
the necessary arrangements so that the 
circulation department will be able to dis- 
tribute the papers so that they will be in 



dinger, his Bowl, Ross Sheesley, and the 
Fiddlers Three. Professor Shaar is hop- 
ing that the original "Fiddlers Three" of 
the college will appear here— Robert 
Sausser, Jack Schuler, and Russell Hatz. 

The dance performed by Little Miss 
Muffets and Simple Simons will consist 
of the following: Hazel Heminway, 
Wanda Price, Martha Baney, Ella Ma- 
son, Greta Heiland, Mary Webb, Jean 
Harnish, and Helen Netherwood, Miss 
Muffets; Lloyd Berger, Marshall Frey, 
Charles Raab, Ben Bollinger, Boyd Shaf- 
fer, Roger Saylor, Clarence Aungst, and 
Carl Shearer, Simple Simons. The Bo 
Peeps and Boy Blues will dance together. 
Bo-Peeps are Velma Gingrich, Ernestine 
Jagnesak, Hazel Heminway, Sylva Har- 
clerode, Lena Risser, Isabel Cox, Lucille 
Mayberry, Martha Shriner. Boy Blues 
are Betty Kirkpatrick, Carolyn Roberts, 
Dorothy Kreamer, Kathryn Mills, Bea- 
trice Zamojski, Agnes Morris, Theresa 
Stefan, and Emma Mary Smyser. 

The Mary Mary Quite Contrarys, 
Ruth Buck, Lois Harbold, and Grace 
Naugle, will water a bed of Flowers and 
bring them to life in a lovely ballet dance. 
Carolyn Kohler, the Spirit of Perfume, 
will be the solo dancer in the Flower Bal- 
let, composed of Ruth Goyne, Sara K. 
Meckley, Eleanor Engle, Eleanor Lynch, 
Sara Light, Esther Koppenhaver, Janet 
Holsinger, Helen Summy, Gayle Mountz, 
Anna Orth, Cordelia Shaeffer, Edna 
Binkley. 

The Red Riding Hoods, Wolves, and 
ihe Three Little Pigs will all make their 
appearance. Red Riding Hoods are: Gail 
Spangler, Christine Yoder, Theresa Ste- 
fan, Mary Zartman, Mary Riegel, Nora 
Franklin, Beatrice Fink, Charlotte Over- 
ly; Wolves, Dean Gasteiger, Gilbert 
Knupp, Adolph Capka, and Richard Kei- 
per; Pigs, Mike Garzella, Ralph Billett, 
Robert Cassel. 

Emma Reinbold will be the Old Wom- 
an in the Shoe, drawn by Brownies — 
William Conway, Russell Heller, Peter 
Klipa, Frank Rozman, and Daniel Shear- 
er. Her children are Pauline Yeager, 
Emily Kindt, Kathryn Knoll, Ethel Houtz, 
Ethel Wilt, Violet Hoerner, Rita Sholley, 
Lucille Hawthorne, and Barbara Sloane. 

The Queen of Hearts, Rose Dieter, and 
the Knave, Galen Baugher, will waltz to- 
gether. Their court consists of: Ladies, 
Elizabeth Carl, Ida Hall, Pauline Snave- 
ly, Sara Heilman; Lords, Alan Steffy, 
Robert Kell, Bernard Stevens, and Duey 
Linger. 

Mother Goose and King Cole will 
dance; the Royal Toys will do a minu- 
et, followed by the Grand Finale and 
Recessional. 

Let us have every student reveal 
enough true college spirit to do every- 
thing possible during these last few days 
to make the efforts of the directors and 
committee chairmen worthwhile— to make 
this the most effective May Day in the 
history of Lebanon Valley College. 



DAD'S WEEK-END 

A BIG SUCCESS 



(Continued from Page One) 



gave a few reminiscences of his college 
experience. Dr. Bierman graduated from 
Lebanon Valley in 1878. 

Dr. Wilt, the pastor of the college 
church, next gave a talk on the relation- 
ship of the church to the college young 
men. Professor J. I. Baugher, superin- 
tendent of the Hershey schools, was next 
called upon to speak. He told about 
modern education and the necessity for 
well-trained men. Professor D. C. Car- 
mean, who is one of the instructors in 
L. V. C.'s department of music, was 
called upon to make a speech. He told 
of the plan whereby he and Mrs. Car- 
mean are to occupy a suite in the men's 
dormitory next year. He prophesied plea- 
sant relationships between himself and 
the students in the dorm. 

To conclude the banquet, all the fa- 
thers and sons present joined in singing 
some well-known songs. The singing was 
led by Dale Roth. At various points in 
the program a male quartette consisting 
of Dale Roth, George Hiltner, Lester 
Krone, and Samuel Harnish regaled the 
banqueters with appreciated song. 



DR. DERICKSON PRESIDES 
AT SCIENCE MEETING 



(Continued from Page Orte) 



SHENK ATTENDS PENNA. 

HISTORICAL MEETING 



(Continued from Page One) 



wealth. Prof. Shenk is a member of the 
executive council of the Association. 

The meeting this year was held in con- 
junction with the Annual History Con- 
ference and consisted of addresses and 
the reading of papers by professors from 
Wilson, Carnegie Tech, University of 
Pittsburgh, Cornell, and other schools, 
and by other prominent speakers, as well 
as a luncheon and dinner on both Friday 
and Saturday. 



of the twenty-four shall be devoted to 
botany and zoology. For teaching phy- 
sical science at least eighteen hours shall 
be spent in chemistry and physics, and 
for teaching general science at least eight 
hours shall be spent in each of biology, 
chemistry and physics. The following 
Lebanon Valley alumni served on this 
committee: Mr. W. N. Martin, '18, Wy- 
omissing, and Mr. Earl Tschudy, '19, 
Hazleton. 

The Friday morning session was called 
to order by President Derickson after 
which Dr. Clyde A. Lynch gave the in- 
vocation. The remainder of the day was 
given over to the reading of short papers 
by members of the society. After dinner 
at the Hotel Argonne, the headquarters 
of the visiting scientists, President Derick- 
son addressed the group on the subject 
"The First Ten Years of the Pennsyl- 
vania Academy of Science in Retrospect." 
The events of the day concluded with a 
public lecture at which Dr. William W. 
Cort of Johns Hopkins University, a 
world-famous authority on the hook- 
worm, spoke on the subject "Biological 
Studies on Human Parasites." 

The meeting was concluded on Satur- 
day morning with the reading of addi- 
tional papers by members. 



There's many a slip in the co-ed's 
laundry. 



Phillips— "Do you believe in the sur- 
vival of the fittest?" 

Leech — "I don't believe in the survival 
of anyone. I'm an undertaker." 



She was so dumb she thought the 
Geneva Arms Conference was a necking 
party. 



SAINT JOHNSBURY ACADEMY 

Saint Johnsbury, Vermont 

An Old New England Academy in an Old New England Town. Thorough 
preparation for college. Commercial courses. Dormitories for boys and girls. 
Tuition $550 covers all expenses. Scholarship aid for worthy boys and girls. 
WRITE PRINCIPAL STANLEY R. OLDHAM. L. V C. 08 



it's somebody's 
birthday! 

Somewhere, someone 
is having a birthday to- 
day — a friend of yours 
perhaps ! 

Reach her by telephone. 
She'd more than welcome 
your spoken greetings be- 
cause your voice is you! 



The Bell Telephone Company of Pennsyh 



No. 15 



LA VIE COLLEGIENNE, THURSDAY, MAY 2, 1935 



PAGE THREE 



Sport Shots 



Lebanon Valley's nine finished its first 
nine innings of intercollegiate competition 
of the 1935 schedule on the short end of 
a count of 8-4, Dickinson having regis- 
tered a victory at the Blue and White's 
expense at Carlisle last Saturday. 

Lebanon Valley scored first, stepping 
into a two-run lead at the start of the 
third inning, but the Red Devils retali- 
ated with a brace of counters in their half 
of the same frame and went out in front 
in the fourth with another pair of runs. 

The Blue and White knotted the count 
again at the beginning of the fifth session 
but a quartet of tallies in the sixth sewed 
up the game for the Dickinsonians. Wit- 
ter and Billett handled the mound duties 
for the Blue and White, fanning a total 
of eleven men, but allowing thirteen hits. 
Sivess, opposing twirler, set down no less 
than fifteen Valleyites on strikes, and al- 
lowed only eight safe bingles. 

The L. V. nine looked good consider- 
ing the fact that it was the first game of 
the season, played against a team which 
has already engaged in several contests. 
Tuesday the Blue and White diamond 
artists opposed Penn State at State Col- 
lege, and yesterday they opened the 
league season against Juniata at Hunting- 
don. Saturday Albright's Lions will be 
contested on the home grounds as one of 
the annual May Day celebration. Sum- 
maries : 

DICKINSON 

r. h. o. a. 

Smith, ss 2 3 12 

Airland, rf 10 10 

Scaraboro, If 2 3 10 

Larsen, If 

Bartley, 2b 2 13 

Binder, lb 17 

Sivess, p 110 2 

Kimmel, 3b 12 10 

McClatchey, cf 110 

Landis, cf 

Reckineg, c 15 

Totals 8 13 27 7 



LEBANON VALLEY 

r. h. o. a. 

Rust, ss 112 

Arndt, 3b 10 2 2 

Bartolet, lb 2 4 

Boran, 2b 10 1 

Barthold, If 13 

Witter, p 1 

Sheesley, rf 10 

Smith, cf 10 

Billett, rf-p 110 

Mentzer, c 1 1 12 

Totals 4 8 24 4 

Errors— Smith, 2; Scaraboro. Two- 
base hits— Barthold, Bartley. Struck out 
—by Sivess 15, Witter, 2; Billett, 9. Base 
on balls— off Sivess, 1; Witter, 3; Billett, 
1. Umpire— Palmer. 

Losing but one of the singles encoun- 
ters and one of the doubles matches, Leb- 
anon Valley's tennis team turned in a 5-2 
triumph in the opening match of the 1935 
court season against the Elizabethtown 
racqueteers on the home courts. 

Homer Donmoyer, Blue and White No. 
1 man, lost the opening match on the card 
to his E-town foe, Newman, in straight 
sets, 6-2 and 6-2. Donmoyer and Nye 
were defeated in their doubles encounter 
with Newman and F. Lander, but only 
after a stiff battle, the scores being 10-8 
and 7-5. 

The other four singles battles resulted 
in victories for Nye, Walborn, Ax, and 
Shroyer over their Elizabethtown oppo- 
nents, and Ax and Shroyer won in the 
second doubles match, bringing the final 
tally to five matches for L. V. C. to two 
victories for Elizabethtown. Summaries: 

Newman, E-town, defeated Donmoyer, 
L. V. C, 6-2, 6-2. 

Nye, L. V. C, defeated F. Lander, 
E-town, 6-0, 6-2. 

Walborn, L. V. C, defeated Zusk, 
E-town, 6-4, 6-2. 

Ax, L. V. C, defeated Cassel, E-town, 
6-3, 6-4. 

Shroyer, L. V. C, defeated E. Lander, 
E-town, 6-2, 6-2. 

Newman and F. Lander defeated Don- 
moyer and Nye, 10-8, 7-5. 

Ax and Shroyer defeated Cassel and 
E. Lander, 6-0, 6-1. 



TWO MEETINGS HELD 

BY COMMERCE CLUB 



(Continued from Page One) 



He struck up a chance acquaintance with 
a man whom he met there in a park. 
During a conversation he learned some 
very important data concerning his own 
industry. This resulted in his being able 
to successfully place several orders that 
other companies could not place because 
of their lack of knowledge. This policy 
pays not only in America but in every 
country of the world. He cited instances 
where courtesy and kindness had been of 
value to him in several European coun- 
tries. 

Mr. Kishpaugh concluded his talk with 
a discussion of Russia which he has twice 
visited. He spent a long while there on 
his last trip since he was selling his serv- 
ices to the government. He was able to 
become fairly well acquainted with the 
country and people, with the result that 
he enlightened the club a great deal on 
conditions there. The social condition of 
the people was probably of more interest 
to the club than the explanation that all 
Knowledge in any industry is the common 
property of all industry. 

T he meeting was indeed a success and 
the Commerce Club wishes to thank Mr. 
Kishpaugh for his services. It also wants 
to thank Mr. Koch for his delightful piano 
jolos and Mr. John Loos who played a 
very fine cornet solo. 



On Monday evening, April 29, the 
Commerce Club held its fourth meeting 
of the year. Mr. Frank C. Heisey, presi- 
dent of the Lebanon Business Men's As- 
sociation, was the principal speaker of 
the evening, giving a very interesting 
and instructive speech on "The Psychol- 
ogy of Selling." 

Due to the severity of a storm, there 
were few present to hear him stress the 
fact that some of the chief factors in suc- 
cess in selling are: to tell the truth, to give 
the customer a square deal, and a pleas- 
ing personality built up through good 
morals and high standards of life. He 
showed very cleverly that success is not 



a destination but a journey. We must 
continually push on and never say in an 
egostistical manner that we are a success 
and therefore decide to rest on our past 
laurels. The result of such action is often 
disastrous to all parties concerned. 

In the latter part of his discourse, Mr. 
Heisey devoted himself to differentiating 
the various types of buyers and pointing 
out the most successful methods of deal- 
ing with them. A few of the outstanding 
ones are: the flighty person who flits from 
counter to counter even as a butterfly 
flits from flower to flower; the person who 
likes to argue and will differ with any- 
one on whatever topic is brought up pure- 
ly for argument's sake; the easy mark 
who will buy anything on impulse and 
then, perhaps, regret doing so to the cha- 
grin of the collector when payments fall 
due. 

In all, there were fifteen different types 
mentioned with the part the salesman has 
to play in order to close the deal. He 
stressed, above everything, the need of a 
salesman to be intelligent enough to keep 
ahead of his customer and be able to an- 
ticipate the latter 's demands. 

The club is much indebted to Mr. Hei- 
sey for addressing our group and also 
wishes to thank Mr. Ferguson of the Leb- 
anon Credit Exchange for helping to se- 
cure the speaker. 



INTERESTING MEETING 

HELD BY DELPHIANS 



(Continued from Page One) 



first number was a Dutch reading by 
Claire Adams. The next number was a 
dramatization of the song "We Just 
Couldn't Say Goodbye." Agnes Morris 
read "The Duel," Velma Gingrich sarig 
a popular song called "A Heart of Stone." 
The last number was a dramatization of 
"Pok-i-hontas." This act kept the Del- 
phians in an uproar which was brought 
to a climax when the north wind, after 
storming across the stage, tripped over 
a stool and fell in a corner. 

The girls spent the rest of the evening 
playing cards, singing popular songs and 
knitting. 



FOREIGN TRADE 



THE BELGIANS SHIP US STUFF- SUCH AS 
STRING, HAIR FELT, AND RIBBON FLY- 
CATCHERS. WE SEND THEM VERYJVIICE 

„ LINSEED OIL CAKE 





— OUR AUTOS AND MOVIES GO ALL 
OVER, AND WE BRING IN SCADS OF 
COCOA BEANS, ART PICTURES. 
AND YES, BANANAS -WE HAVn i 
NO BANANAS. >. r^X^^ 




PAGE FOUR 



LA VIE COLLEGIENNE, THURSDAY, MAY 2, 1935 




M m m m m m I 
BREAKFAST 
Toasted Raisin Bread 
and 
Coffee 



THE PENNWAY 



ROEMIG'S 
RESTAURANT 

UNDER NEW MANAGEMENT 
w#vv 

New Name To Be 
Chosen By Contest 

WIN A PRIZE 



Campus Cuts 



At last, we must admit that spring is 
with us, that is, if this is not another one 
of those false alarms we've been having. 
At any rate, the tennis courts are being 
much used, probably too much for some 
of these budding Tildens who have to 
sit on the sidelines disgruntledly coach- 
ing and jeering those of the lesser ability 
who happened to get there first. And 
what is not said and thought of that chick- 
en yard is hardly worth considering by 
the users of invective language. 



According to Fred Allen, famous mas- 
ter of ceremonies of the N. B. C. ama- 
teur hour, Lebanon Valley is one of the 
leading colleges of America. Yes, indeed, 
dear reader, we have been represented 
in a major broadcast program. "Fritz" 
Hatz (those two names go together 
rather well. Not?), "Joshua" Sausser, 
"Rubinoff" Schuler, and "Eddie" Ander- 
son are the guys responsible for the pub- 
licity. Some of the less important col- 
leges represented were Yale, Princton, 
N. Y. U., and others. The boys salve 
their hurt of defeat with the knowledge 
that there was New York competition to 
be reckoned with in the applause, and 
rightly so, we agree. Fred Allen made a 
crack about the boys making up an Ann- 
ville chorus. Well, at least we can be 
thankful that nothing was said about 
Lebanon bologna. 



And while we are on the subject, we 
might mention Dale Roth. He was more 
successful, but on a smaller scale. He 
took first prize in a program broadcast 
from York. To add to his prowess, there 
were telephone calls to the station to 
repeat his number. We would not dare 
to think that any of them came from the 
vicinity of Annville. 



THESPIANS PRESENT 

SHORT COMEDY SKIT 



(Continued from Page One) 



There's a good story floating about the 
campus. It could and would be included 
here in full detail, but Jean McKeag takes 
such a hideous delight in telling it that 
we would rather give her a chance. See 
her for the full, unexpurgated account. 
We refer to the automobile incident. 



That, friends, constitutes the publish- 
able dirt for this issue. Anyone who 
knows anything louder and funnier, see 
the editor. 



tor and the meeting is called. Mrs. Lem- 
mingworth, a very dictatorial woman, 
takes full charge and neither the rector 
nor anybody else present chooses to ar- 
gue with her for it would be useless. 

As the action continues, we are amused 
at Mrs. Lemmingworth's efforts and Mrs. 
Munsey's weaknesses. We laugh at the 
awkward Miss Trimball and sympathize 
with Margaret Norton. In the end, in 
spite of all the plans made for him by 
others, the rector asks Victoria Knox to 
be his wife— Victoria who was so late 
that she was not at the meeting at all. 

Robert Spohn was able to interpret the 
rector's part without difficulty, this being 
not the first time he carried the role. His 
characterization was excellent. His voice 
was pitched a trifle too high throughout 
the play and would have sounded better 
if he had spoken in a natural tone. His 
acting was excellent and could not have 
been improved. 

Mrs. Lemmingworth's part, taken by 
Sylva Harclerode, was excellently done. 
She domineered all those present to the 
extent of trying to force the rector to 
marry Miss Trimball. She well repre- 
sented a domineering female character in 
any organization. 

Mrs. Munsey, taken by Lois Harbold, 
was especially good. It was a difficult 
part to do well. She was a young and 
attractive widow who had been pam- 
pered all her life and expected every- 
body to pay attention to her. She talked 
incessantly in a gushing manner but nev- 
er said much. Nevertheless she was sin- 
cere. She might have easily overdone 
the part but she played it perfectly. 

Dorothy Kreamer in the part of Miss 
Trimball added the humor to the play. 
She was exceptionally good and the audi- 
ence appreciated her tremendously. Her 
appearance in four-buckle galoshes was 
in keeping with her personality. She did 
not make her part silly but genuinely 
amusing. 

Grace Naugle played Margaret Nor- 
ton. She was an intelligent, broadmind- 
ed, and sympathetic young girl with a 
great deal of dignity, but she lost the 
affections of the rector to Victoria, her 
friend. Miss Naugle showed fine ability 
in expression. Her part was difficult but 
she brought out the fine qualities in the 
character of Margaret. 

Louise Stoner took the part of Vic- 
toria Knox, the object of the rector's af- 
fection. She was a bright, young and 
frivolous girl yet with a certain poise 
and sophistication. Louise fitted and act- 
ed the part perfectly. When Mr. Herres- 
ford told her that he loved her, she was 



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greatly surprised but in a very coy man- 
ner she accepted the delightful surprise 
and him. 

Martha Faust took the part of Janie, 
the rector's house-maid. She was inter- 
ested in all matters which concerned him 
and made it her point to overlook noth- 
ing. Miss Faust exploited all the comic 
possibilities of her role to perfection. 

Miss McAdams and Mr. Magee are to 
be congratulated for their fine directing. 
It required a great deal of time on their 
part but the results show their excep- 
tional ability. Harold Phillips for the 
make-up and stage hands for assisting the 
players are to be thanked and the audi- 
ence regrets only the fact that the play 
was just one act. As a character sketch 
it ranked as one of the best given in 
school. 




Prof. Stokes— "My father was a great 
politician in his day." 
Prof. Gingrich— "What did he run for?" 
Prof. Stokes— "The border." 



Carolyn— "I think dancing makes a 
girl's feet big, don't you?" 

Boy Friend— "Yeah." 

Carolyn— "I think swimming gives a 
girl awfully large shoulders, don't you?" 

Boy Friend— "Yeah." 

Pause. 

Boy Friend— "You must ride quite a 
bit, too." 



Shelley— "Isn't it strange that the 
length of a man's arm is equal to the cir- 
cumference of a girl's waist?" 

Gruber— "Let's get a string and see." 



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Van Heusen Shirts 

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LEBANON VALLEY COLLEGE 



Read 
The New 
Column 



VOL. XII 



ANNVILLE, PENNSYLVANIA, THURSDAY, MAY 9, 1935 



No. 3 



L. V. C. Nine 

Defeats Albright 

ONLY TWO HITS FOR LIONS 



Billett Pitches Great Ball As 
Valley Batsmen Run 
Riot 



A pitchers' battle staged between Billett, 
Blue and White hurler, and Fatzinger, 
Albright righthander, was turned into a 
complete rout of the Lion forces last 
Saturday when the Flying Dutchmen 
celebrated May Day with an eighth-in- 
ning riot of runs to rout their traditional 
rivals and score their second straight 
Eastern Pennsylvania Collegiate League 
victory. When the smoke of battle cleared 
and the official scorer secured an adding 
machine, it was found that the Blue and 
White had counted no less than eleven 
times in their spectacular splurge and a 
first-inning tally brought the total to an 
even dozen counters to compare with a 
series of nine successive zeros chalked 
up for the Lions against the airtight pitch- 
ing of the sophomore sensation, Paul Bil- 
lett. 

Only 29 men faced Billett all afternoon. 
Of this number, seventeen had the plea- 
sure of retiring to the bench with Umpire 
Gallagher's basso profundo voice ring- 
ing in their ears to the tune of "steer-rike 
three, yer gone." Only two hits, both 
singles, were registered by the Lions, and 
two of the opposing batsmen reached first 
base, one on a last-inning error chalked 
against Rust, and the other on the single 
base on balls given by Billett. Of this 
quartet of runners, only one advanced as 
far as second base. Haldeman registered 
a single in the seventh and moved to sec- 
ond while Felty was being retired on a 
long fly to Barthold. The Albright short- 
stop was left stranded at the keystone 
sack as Fatzinger went down on strikes 
for the third out of the inning. Haldeman 
had previously been left out in the cold 
when Felty flied out to Witter after the 
Lion shortfielder had drawn a base on 
halls in the fourth session. The other two 
(Continued on Page 4, Column 1) 



PRESIDENT'S CALENDAR 



May 2— Attended the Association 
of College Presidents at the Penn 
Harris Hotel. 

May 3— Present at the State Coun- 
cil of Education held at the Forum in 
Harrisburg. 

May 4— In the morning, attended 
'he inauguration of Dickinson's new 
President, Dr. Corson. After Lebanon 
Valley's May Day program, attended 
Philo's Anniversary at Reading. 

May 5 — Preached at the 40th anni- 
versary service of the Pleasant Hill 
United Brethren Church. 

In the evening, addressed the Young 

e °ple's Anniversary service at 
lVle Shepherdstown United Brethren 
Church. The college quartette accom- 
p:i nied him on this trip. 



Y Cabinets Confer 

On Valley Campus 

The Y. M. C. A. and '. W. C. A. Cabi- 
nets of the college entertained a group 
of representatives from various nearby 
schools at a cabinet training conference 
on Tuesday. There were approximately 
thirty visitors who met to discuss with 
Student Christian Movement leaders such 
problems vital to the functioning of a 
successful cabinet as: qualifications of of- 
ficers, meetings and programs, campus 
problems, intercollegiate seminars, Eagles 
Mere, budgets, and work with new stu- 
dents. Franklin and Marshall, Albright, 
Millersville, and Elizabethtown were the 
colleges which cooperated with Lcoanon 
(Continued on Page 2, Column 1) 



Phi!o Celebrates 
68th Anniversary 

HOLDS ANNUAL FORMAL 



Kentuckians Play For Society 
Dance Held At Berkshire 
Hotel 



The formal dance to celebrate the six- 
ty-eighth anniversary of the Philokos- 
mian Literary Society was held in the 
beautiful ballroom of the Berkshire hotel 
in Reading, Pa., on Saturday night, May 
4. The dance, which lasted from eight 
o'clock P. M. to 11:30, was one of the 
most colorful the society has ever spon- 
sored. Kenneth Sheaffer was the anniver- 
sary president. 

The music for the affair was furnished 
by the "Kentuckians," a ten-piece orches- 
tra from Wilmington, Delaware. They 
presented a very enjoyable program, in- 
cluding a college medley which contained 
a special arrangement of some of our own 
Lebanon Valley campus airs. The pro- 
gram also included a number of vocal se- 
lections, presented by a charming young 
couple who accompanied the orchestra. 

Almost sixty couples were present, 
among whom were: Dr. and Mrs. Lynch, 
Dr. and Mrs. Wallace, and Dr. and Mrs. 
Struble, who acted as chaperones. 

The favors given on this occasion were 
boxes which contain compartments for 
cosmetics and jewelry. A committee com- 
posed of Lester Lingle, Galen Baugher, 
and Lester Krone arranged for the dance. 



CLIO-PHILO PL A YERS 
GIVE ST RIKIN G DRAMA 

PROF. STRUBLE COACHES STAGE HIT 

Large Audience Held Breathless By Tragedy As Cast Gives Real 
Professional Performance Of Martin Flavin's Play, "The 
Children of the Moon." 



Reviewed by MRS. P. A. W. WALLACE 



As we settle down again after the 
crowded days of the past week-end. we 
all look back with very real pleasure to 
the time spent in Engle hall on Friday 
night, May 3, when we attended the joint 
production by the Clionian and Philokos- 
mian Literary Societies of Martin Fla- 
vin's play, "The Children of the Moon." 
This tragedy, a study of a slight heredi- 
tary insanity running through three gen- 
erations of the Atherton family, inevita- 
bly reminds one of Clemence Dane's "A 
Bill of Divorcement," written on a simi- 
lar theme. 

"The Children of the Moon," while not 
a great play, is an interesting one. The 
first act seems rather long drawn out, 
with too much time spent in arousing 
suspense before we are told of the motif 
of the action. The second act is well 
written and motivated, and rises to a real 
crisis which leaves the audience tense. 

The third act is much weaker and the 
ending somewhat unsatisfactory. Several 



Student Musicians 
Prepare Concerto 

E. P. RUTLEDGE DIRECTING 



Bailey and Orchestra Co-star In 
Greatest Musical Number 
Of the year 



On Friday evening, May 17, the great 
MacDowell Concerto No. 2 for piano 
and orchestra will be rendered in Engle 
hall of the Conservatory building, with 
the efficient E. P. Rutledge directing the 
orchestra, and our talented and accom- 
plished Ruth Bailey at the piano. 

The concerto is composed of three 
movements: Larghetto calmato; Presto 
giocoso and Largo-molto allegro being 
(Continued on Page 3, Column 4) 



members of the audience expressed this 
criticism by asking what D7D happen, 
showing, maybe, a lack of imagination 
or understanding on their part, but also 
suggesting a weakness in the text— not, 
I think, in the action. The acting of the 
players in the first act was sometimes 
rather slow and stiff, but in the second 
act the actors came thoroughly alive and 
showed real power in difficult emotional 
scenes. The third act slowed down again, 
but that was more the fault of the play 
than of the acting. This act would have 
been greatly helped had the off-stage 
sound and lighting effects been more sus- 
tained. The moon was allowed to shine 
brightly all the time, though the fog was 
talked of insistently. Most sea fogs that 
call for a fog-horn at least dim the power 
of the moonlight, and a fog so insistent 
as to cause Thomas to feel rheumatism 
in his knees would have needed a fog- 
horn all the time. If we had heard the 
weird booming of the horn throughout the 
scene, and at the end had heard the roar 
of the plane as it took off on its last 
journey, the sense of tragedy and finality 
would have been complete. 

"The Children of the Moon" is a wom- 
an's play, the male parts being quite sub- 
ordinate to those of the women. Miss 
Louise Stoner made a charming heroine. 
She was rather stiff in the first act, but 
showed herself capable of real, emotional 
acting in Act 2. 

Her mother, Laura, a thoroughly neu- 
rotic woman, was well played by Miss 

(Continued on Page 3, Column 4) 



May Day Dancers Battle Icy Wind 



Hail! May Day, with its dull and 
dreary sky, with its chilling wind and 
threat of rain. Hail! Lebanon Valley 
College's 1935 May Day. Brilliant but 
absurd costumes: —Boy Bit , Miss Muf- 
fet, Simple Simon— persuiu .ng the audi- 
:nce to forget the conditions and trans- 
planting them into Mother Goose Land 
(or would have transplanted them were 
it not for reporters, cameras, and camera- 
men). People claim that if a May Day 
ticket permits amateur or professional 



photographers to halt the queen's proces- 
sion, distract the dancing groups, ob- 
struct the audience's view, then every- 
one should mob the queen. 

After the band in its natty blue and 
white uniform heralded the arrival of the 
queen, the audience with "ahs" and ' ohs 
paid tribute to the natural loveliness and 
gorgeous gown of Miss Frances Holtz- 
man. Miss Catherine Wagner's dignity 
was nearly lost when the tiny flower girls 

(Continued on Page 4, Column 2) 



CONSERV RECITALS 



A spring recital will be held in 
Engle hall May 14. Those participat- 
ing will be: Oleta Deitrich, violin; Stu- 
art Goodman, tenor; Helen Summy, 
soprano; a trio composed of Russell 
Hatz, viola, Martha Elser, violin and 
Anthony Jagnesak, flute; Sara Light, 
piano, and Catherine Deisher, organ. 

Another spring recital will be held 
on May 16 in Engle hall. The parti- 
cipants will be Charlotte Stabley, con- 
tralto; Ethel Keller, piano; Robert 
Scheirer, bassoon, and Kathleen Poole, 
piano, will, together present a concerto 
for bassoon and piano; and Martha 
Elser, Russell Hatz, and Nancy Bow- 
man will give a suite for two violins 
and piano. 



PAGE TWO 



LA VIE COLLEGIENNE, THURSDAY, MAY, 9, 1935 



Ha Viz (LoUegtemte 

ESTABLISHED 1925 

A weekly publication by the Under- 
graduate Students of Lebanon 
Valley College 



EDITORIAL STAFF 

David Yake, '36 ...Editor-in-Chief 

Lester Krone, '36_ Associate Editor 

Richard Baus, '37 Managing Editor 




REPORTORIAL STAFF 

Louise Gillan, '36 
Marian Leisey, '36 
Maxine Earley, '37 
Grace Naugle, '37 
Martha Baney, '38 
Jean McKeag, '38 
Paul Schach, '38 
Emma Mary Smyser, '38 

Calvin Spitler, '38 General Reporters 

Sylvia Evelev. '36 

Robert Spohn, '36 Features 

Helen Summy. '36 _ Conservatory 

William Earnest. '37 Athletics 

Eleanor Lynch, '37. .Faculty and Alumni 

Duey Unger, '37 Kalozetean 

June Gingrich, '36 Delphian 

Louis Straub, '37 „.Philokosmian 

Jane Shellenberger, '36 Clionian 

BUSINESS STAFF 

Albert Anderson, '36 Business Manager 

Robert Kell, '37 Assistant Business Manager 

Elwood Needy, '37 Circulation Manager 

David Byerly, '38 Asst. Circulation Manager 



Single Copies- 
Subscription... 



5 cents 

..$1.00 per year 



Entered at the Annville, Pa., post 
office as second class matter, under the 
Act of March 3, 1879. 



THURSDAY, MAY 9, 1935 



ALUMNI ISSUE NEXT WEEK 



The next issue of the La Vie Colle- 
gienne will be the annual Alumni Issue 
which is published with the cooperation 
af the Alumni officials and is sent out to 
hundreds of Lebanon Valley graduates. 
After the Alumni Issue there will be two 
more issues for this semester after which 
the La Vie will close up shop until next 
fall. 



Y CABINETS CONFER 

ON VALLEY CAMPUS 



(Continued from Page One) 



Valley in holding the conference, which 
was previously arranged by Miss Ann 
Graybill, a former Bucknell student and 
an active worker for the Student Chris- 
tian Movement. 

Miss Graybill and Dr. Harry Bone of 
New York conducted the conference pro- 
gram which lasted from 4:00 P. M. until 
10:00. Dr. Bone is a graduate of Wash- 
burn college, has served as a secretary — 
regional and national— of the Student Y. 
M. C. A., and has led discussions on 
campus problems in all sections of the 
United States. He has taken graduate 
work at the Universities of Colorado, 
Chicago, and Columbia, and at Union 
Theological Seminary. The last two and 
a half years he has spent in Paris, where 
he has been a member of the Psychologi- 
cal Center. The practical experiences of 
the young ex-student, Miss Graybill, and 
the interesting nationally^known lecturer 
combined to make the conference discus- 
sions individually worth while. Each of- 
ficer of the Student Christian Movement 
has been given a clearer viewpoint re- 
garding his work and responsibilities. It 
is the goal of the conference to make as 
its result better equipped cabinets work- 
ing unitedly for better relations and con- 
ditions on their campuses. 



L.V.Stage 



Five hundred hearts throbbing in five 
hundred throats for two and one half 
hours during an excellent performance of 
the most difficult play of the year— the 
Clio-Philo Club play, readers. 



LIBRARY NOTES 



A gripping psychopathic situation 
handled with convincing success by a 
well-cast group— hats off to Dr. Struble! 



Miss McKeag held her college audi- 
ence in such suspense at times that the 
proverbial pin dropping would have 
sounded like a minor explosion. Her 
well-adapted range of voice, studied in- 
flection, and stage presence gave her per 
formance absolute genuineness. Her 
Laura, at first despised, gradually drew 
our pity. Watch those final syllables, 
Miss McKeag, they floated into thin air 
at times and congratulations on a sincere 
and excellent performance. By the way, 
it was Jean's first play. 



Miss Stoner played a slow first act in 
which she seemed lifeless and too con- 
scious of her audience. The second and 
third acts in which she revealed her tor- 
tured emotions were dramatically tense 
and brilliant. Her pleasing stage appear- 
ance offset her inexperience and a slight- 
ly saccharine voice. With coaching, Miss 
Stoner will develop into a clever actress 
One thing more, Miss Stoner, "been" i: 
not pronounced "ben." 



Miss Zartman spoke strainedly but 
with good inflection and excellent use of 
the facial muscles. She berated Laura in 
a passionate tone that rang true. She 
was somewhat too active and youthful 
for the part. However, make-up and spec- 
tacles would have remedied the situation. 
She put across admirably an atmosphere 
of kindliness and magnanimity. 



Kenneth Sheaffer's pleasing voice and 
complete ease on the stage bolstered the 
authenticity of the action considerably. 
He attacked his cigar in a gingerly ciga- 
rette fashion but soon was puffing away 
confidently. Done like an "old stager," 
Ken. 



Lester Krone as the internaUy injured 
avntor was erratic. He lacked the enthu- 
siasm of a man in love but carried the 
role with true military bearing. 



Allan Steffy, the nutty grandfather of 
the moon-obsessed Athertons, Clyde Ma- 
gee, with a sea-faring man's appetite, 
and \Vj;liam Earnest, the faithful me- 
chanic, carried the humor aptly. 



The make-up, except for Miss Zart- 
man's, was excellent. The lighting was 
well calculated in the use of green and 
amber, the fog-horn was realistic but 
should have been sustained, and the air- 
plane motor effect was cheesy. A badly- 
constructed door was annoying. 

Lebanon Valley audiences are improv- 
ing. It took the one on Friday night only 
an act and a half to get into the spirit of 
the play. 



Putting all analysis aside, this play was 
as high class a production as may be seen 
on most college stages. Give us more like 
it, Thespians! 



Recently the following list of books 
was completed by Miss Myers, the col 
lege librarian, as the final purchase made 
from the endowment fund of the class of 
1916. Each book was selected carefully 
and chosen because of its merit in some 
particular phase of study. 

Breasted— Dawn of Conscience, Bailey 
— How Plants Get Their Names, Parker 
and Haswell— Manual of Zoology, Wal- 
ter—Biology of the Vertebrates, Ameri- 
ca's Power to Consume. 

Wright — Life Histories of Frogs, 
Walker— Biology of Civilization, Baum- 
gartner— Laboratory Manual of the Foe- 
tal Pig, Bigelow— Directions for Dissec- 
tion of Cat, Little— Laboratory Manual 
for Comparative Anatomy. 

Hill— Chemical Wave Transmission in 
Nerves, Jackman— Development of Trans- 
portation in England, Englebrecht— Mer- 
chants of Death, Hanighen— Secrets of 
War, Williams— Peoples and Politics of 
Latin America, Beard— Open Door at 
Home, Beard— Idea of National Interest, 
Swinnerton— Georgian Scene, Davey— 
Study of Crystal Structure, Ridley- 
Keats Craftsmanship. 



CLIO-PHILO PLAYERS 

GIVE STRIKING DRAMA 



CONSERV NOTES 



The second spring recital was given 
Tuesday evening, May 7. Those parti- 
cipating were Ida Katharine Hall, sopra- 
no; John Loos, cornet; Ruth Goyne, pi- 
ano; Kathleen Pool, organ; and Martha 
Elser, violin. The accompanists were Rae 
Anna Reber and Ruth Buck. 

Thursday evening another spring re- 
cital will be given in Engle hall. Those 
participating in this recital will be: Nan- 
cy Bowman, piano; Russell Hatz, violin; 
Irma Keiffer, piano, and Gayle Mountz, 
soprano. Ruth Buck and Kathleen Poole 
will be accompanists. 



(Continued from Page One) 

Jean McKeag. It was a difficult p ar t 
well handled. Miss Mary Zartman as 
Madam Atherton gave a remarkably con- 
sistent study of an old lady. Miss Zart- 
man's clear tone and clear enunciation of 
every word were a delight to listen to 
and her dignified, quiet, but forceful as- 
sertion of her personality was a very able 
piece of work. 

Lester Krone as the hero, handsome in 
ids uniform, made the best of what was 
;.iter all a very conventional part. Ken- 
neth Sheaffer made an excellent doctor 
with his familiar and assured professional 
manner. His outburst against Laura was 
well done. 

Allan Steffy presented a well-sustained 
study of the weak old man, the first of 
the Children of the Moon. Both Mr. 
Sheaffer and Mr. Steffy showed that they 
had sunk themselves in their parts, and 
their characterizations made a fitting cli- 
max to their dramatic careers at college. 
Clyde Magee as Thomas provided most 
of the humor, and acted with a delicacy 
and sureness that added much to the sub- 
tle atmosphere of the play. Mr. Earnest 
made an engaging young sergeant. But 
his Cockney and his motor grease seemed 
assumed for the occasion. Only a Cock- 
ney can speak Cockney, and only an old 
shirt well worn acquires that patina of 
dirt and grease that marks a convincing 
mechanic. We look forward to seeing 
Mr. Earnest in a real part some day. 

The stage was a live one, well bal- 
anced and lighted. The make-up was 
good, except for the mechanic. The dis- 
tinction between the generations was well 
done. 

We heartily congratulate the members 
of the cast for an excellent performance, 
and Dr. Struble for a very fine, detailed 
piece of coaching, by far the best he has 
dene on this campus. 



SAINT JOHNSBURY ACADEMY 

Saint Johnsbury, Vermont 

An Old New England Academy in an Old New England Town. Thorough 
preparation for college Commercial courses. Dormitories for boys and girls, 
luition $550 covers all expenses. Scholarship aid for worthy boys and girls. 
WRITE PRINCIPAL STANLEY R. OLDHAM, L. V C OS 




The Bell Telephone Company of Pennsyb 



No. 1 



LA VIE COLLEGIENNE, THURSDAY, MAY, 9, 1935 



PAGE THREE 



Sport Shots 



Lebanon Valley's tennis team met dis- 
aster in the last four matches scheduled 
for the past week. These were washed 
out by the continual rains, and the single 
one played resulted in a 5-4 defeat for 
the Blue and White racqueteers at the 
hands of the Dickinson netmen at Car- 
lisle last Wednesday. 

Seven of the nine matches were carried 
to the three-set limit, but the Yalleyites' 
fighting spirit was all to no avail as they 
i.plil even in the half dozen singles en- 
counters and then dropped two of the 
three doubles matches to succumb by the 
r.lim margin of a single match. 

Donmoyer, Shroyer, and Lazin turned 
in victories over their singles opponents, 
but the doubles team of Shroyer and La- 
zin was the only one of the three L. V. 
C. combinations able to turn in a triumph. 
Summaries: 

Singles— Donmoyer, L. V. C, defeated 
Steele, Dickinson, 3-6; 6-3; 6-4. 

Rosenberg, Dickinson, defeated Nye, 
L. V. C, 6-2; 6-3. 

Eton, Dickinson, defeated Walborn, L. 
V. C, 6-4; 3-6; 6-2. 

Falk, Dickinson, defeated Ax, L. V. C, 
6-3; 6-3. 

Shroyer, L. V. C, defeated Wertz, 
Dickinson, 6-3; 6-8; 9-7. 

Lazin, L. V. C, defeated Hershner, 
Dickinson, 4-6; 9-7; 6-4. 

Doubles — Rosenberg and Steele de- 
feated Donmoyer and Nye, 6-2; 4-6; 6-2. 

Eton and Falk defeated Walborn and 
Ax, 4-6; 6-4; 6-4. 

Lazin and Shroyer defeated Wertz and 
Hershner, 6-4; 4-6; 6-4. 

The schedule for this week includes 
three matches. Yesterday Juniata was 
listed to oppose the Blue and White on 
the home courts, and the F. and M. en- 
counter which was rained out last Friday 
has been re-scheduled for today, this 
match also being on the home courts. To- 
morrow the netmen travel to Lewisburg 
to cross racquets with the Bucknellians 
to round out a busy week. 



SUMMARIES OF LEBANON VALLEY GAMES WITH PENN STATE & JUNIATA 

Lebanon Valley divided two games last week, losing to Penn State at State College by a count of 11 to 1, 
but defeating Juniata, 5-1, in the Blue and White's first league start, with Billett starring on the mound and Pa- 



trizio leading at bat. 






Lebanon 


Valley 






r. 


h. 


o. 


a. 


Rust, ss 


1 


1 


2 


3 


Sheesley, If .... 





1 


1 





Bartolet, lb .... 








4 





Boran, 2b 





1 


2 


1 


Barthold, cf .. 








2 


1 


Kroske, c 








2 





Mentzer, c 








3 





Smith, rf 








1 





Feeser, 3b 














Tindall, p 














Witter, p 








1 





Totals 1 


3 


18 


5 



Penn State 

r. h. o. a. 
Stocker, 3b .... 112 1 
McKechnie, lb 1 

Miller, cf 2 

Bielicki, rf .... 2 
Robbins, 2b .... 2 
Kornick, c .... 1 

Ohora, ss 1 

Slabodian, If .. 
Rugh, p 1 



8 
2 

2 3 
6 

2 
1 



Lebanon Valley 

r. h. o. a. 

Rust, ss 1 

Patrizio, If .... 2 3 



Juniata 

r. h. o. a. 



3 3 Shingler, 2b .. 2 
1 o Kepler, ss 



Totals 11 11 21 11 

Lebanon Valley 1 0—1 

Penn State 4 1 6 x-11 

Errors— Barthold, Feeser, Tindall, McKechnie. 
Three-base hit— Rust. Home run— Korniik. Double" 
play— Ohora to Robbins to McKechnie. Struck out— 
by Rugh 7, Witter 4. Base on balls— off Rugh 1 , Tin- 
dall 3, Witter 4. 



Bartolet, lb .... 9 Kunsman - 3b ■■ 

Sicholson, lb.. 1 

4 Scott, cf 

1 Black, c 

Jenkins, c 



1 
1 
1 




Mentzer, c .... 1 1 10 Daher, rf 2 

Billett, p 1 2 Kne PP er - 3 5> -00 

Arndt, 3b 12 



Boran, 2b 2 

Barthold, cf .. 1 1 
Witter, rf 1 



Flanagan, 3b.. 11 
Matlock, p .... 2 1 



Totals 5 10 27 9 Totals 1 7x26 11 

x Witter out, hit by batted ball. 
Lebanon Valley .... 1 0000300 1—5 
Juniata 00000 1 00 0—1 

Errors— Rust, Boran, Kepler, 3. Two-base hits— 
Arndt, Patrizio. Three-base hits— Daher, Patrizio. 
Home run— Patrizio. Struck out— by Matlock 4, Bil- 
lett 10. Base on balls— off Matlock 2, Billett 2. 



Campus Cuts 

It seems as though, after all these 
months the freshmen— especially the 
girls, think they're quite the thing around 
these parts. They displayed a very con- 
temptible side of their nature on May 
Day when they practically refused to 
have anything to do in helping to prepare 
for the pageant. They had better soon 
realize that they are too, too insignificant 
for words, they simply don't know every- 
thing there is to know, and they just 
can't get away with that stuff. A word 
to the wise is sufficient, so be careful, 
freshmen! 



many streamers on as the real one had 
and dolls at the end of each streamer in 
various flower costumes. On the top was 
written "Lebanon Valley College May 
Day." The cake was cut on Saturday 
and distributed to quite a few people. 



May Day was quite a big affair, not 
only on the campus but also in room 14 
of North Hall. It seems as though Louise 
Shearer's parents were quite proud of 
their fond offspring being in the May 
pole dance so they brought her a very 
large May-pole cake with exactly as 



Congratulations to Miller Schmuck for 
his very clever piece of work on the shoe 
for the pageant. It was one of the clever- 
est things that has ever been done for 
the campus festival. 

And say, we don't mind the short cir- 
cuits in the gym when there's a dance, 
but for goodness' sake why do they insist 
on substituting the glaring dome lights in 
the emergency? The dark would be much 
better— providing the orchestra knows 
"Dinah" and another piece or so. What 
do ya say, fellas? 



STUDENT MUSICIANS 

PREPARE CONCERTO 



(Continued from Page One) 



What do you suggest for Ginney? She 
seems to have lost her voice all of a sud- 
den. Jack certainly must have scared her 
some way or another. The big bully! 



the last movement of this magnificent 
concerto. The composition is the biggest 
that ever has been given here— and as 
the movements suggest the composition 
is at times quite heavy and stormy, then 
in direct contrast calm and placid— cer- 
tainly worthwhile hearing. 

The orchestra will also play such num- 
bers as the outstanding and famous "Ra- 
vel Bolero"; two movements for the 
"Suite Algerienne," by Saint Saens, and 
an overture, "Men of Prometheus," by 
Ludwig von Beethoven. Several shorter 
numbers will also be given by the or- 
chestra. 



Ricker— "Sir, I want your daughter for 
my wife." 

Mr. Ford— "And I, sir, am not willing 

to trade." 



JOURNALISM 



WHEN A DOG BITES A MAN, IT ISN'T 
NEWS — UNLESS THE MAN IS A BIG 
SHOT. THEN V0U SHOULD GET THE A 
J>0Q>S PI CTURE. ^ -5-4 




★ EXTRA /EXTRA / * 



THE BEST NEWS SMOKERS HAVE 
EVER H AD IS THAT PRINCE ALBERT 
IS MILD , MELLOW, AND 
NEVER BITES THE TONGUE 
THAT SMOKES IT 
TRY P. A./ 

M - M - 





PAGE FOUR 



LA VIE COLLEGIENNE, THURSDAY, MAY, 9, 1935 




M m m m m m I 

BREAKFAST 
Toasted Raisin Bread 
and 
Coffee 



THE PENNWAY 



ROEMIG'S 
RESTAURANT 

UNDER NEW MANAGEMENT 

New Name To Be 
Chosen By Contest 

WIN A PRIZE 



L. V. C. NINE 

DEFEATS ALBRIGHT 



(Continued from Page One) 



Readingites who reached base did not 
even last long enough to expire on the 
paths, but were erased by accurate pegs 
from Mentzer to Rust at second base. 
Perette, who singled in the. third inning, 
and Becker, who poked one through Char- 
lie Rust in the ninth, were both retired 
attempting to steal the keystone sack. 

Fatzinger did quite an acceptable job 
on the mound for the Red and White for 
the first seven innings. He fanned eight, 
walked but two, and allowed only five 
hits and one run during that time. Rust 
walked in the opening inning, scampered 
to third while Patrizio was being retired, 
Fittapaldi to Becker, and dented the plate 
with the first Valley run on Bartolet's 
single. 

Both pitchers were in complete control 
of the situation from the time Rust count- 
ed until the seventh inning, when Fatzin- 
ger was forced to work himself out of a 
hole. Boran singled to open the Valley 
half of that inning. He promptly stole 
second, and Barthold drew a walk after a 
count of three and two had been called. 
Boran and Barthold worked a double steal 
while Witter was fanning, but Mentzer 
and Billett could not deliver the necessary 
bingle. This failure to score brought the 
teams into the eighth with L". V. C. lead- 
ing by a slim 1-0, Billett being a shade 
better than his rival. Both pitchers had 
attained top form in the fifth, six straight 
batsmen retiring on strikes in that session. 
But the eighth inning was something 
quite different! 

Nine Valleyites faced Fatzinger in that 
fatal inning before the Lion twirler was 
finally replaced by Claude Felty. The 
latter also found the going tough, and six 
more men came to bat before the side 
was finally retired after eleven runs had 
been registered. 

Paul Billett's triple was the parting 
shot against Fatzinger. The pitcher's 
wallop came with the bases filled and 
scored the fifth, sixth, and seventh runs 
of the inning, and would have been a 
home run if Billett had not stumbled 
rounding first base. A single and a double 
by Boran, Billett's triple, three other sing- 
les, three bases on balls, and three errors 
were the ingredients which accounted for 
the Valley's eleven counters. A force-out 
and two strike-outs by Felty finally re- 
tired the side. 



The ninth was just a breeze for Billett. 
Becker got a life on an error, but was out 
foaling. Fittapaldi fanned for the fourth 
straight time, and Scholl was the twenty- 
seventh out on strikes, bringing Billett's 
strike-out total for the game to seventeen. 

Every member of the Blue and White 
nine counted at least once, Rust leading 
the parade across the plate with three 
tallies. Boran led the stickmen with three 
singles and a double in five trips to the 
plate and ran wild on the paths, being 
credited with three stolen bases. Billett's 
triple was the longest hit of the day, and 
was an extremely timely wallop, seeming 
to complete the demoralization of the 
Lions. Catcher Mentzer did a nice job 
behind the plate, catching in veteran 
style, throwing accurately to keep Lion 
base-runners in check, and contributing 
two hits in four times at bat to his day's 
work. 

Five errors did the Albright nine a lot 
of no good, contributing greatly to the 
complete breakdown of the Lions. Con- 
sidering everything, it was a great game 
— for Lebanon Valley. How about it, 
Lions? 

Lebanon Valley 

ab. r. h. o. a. e. 

Rust, ss 4 3 2 1 

Patrizio, If 4 1 

Bartolet, lb 5 2 2 5 

Boran, 2b 5 1 4 2 

Barthold. cf 4 1110 

Witter, rf 3 1110 

Mentzer, c 4 1 2 17 2 

Billett, p 4 1 10 2 

Arndt, 3b 3 10 110 

Totals 36 12 11 27 7 1 

Albright 

ab. r. h. o. a. e. 

Fittapaldi, 2b 4 1 1 

Scholl, c 4 10 2 

Haldeman, ss 2 14 10 

Felty, 3b-p 3 1 

Fatzinger, p-lf 3 1 4 1 

Riffle, rf 3 1 

Oberzut, lf-3b 3 

Perette, cf 3 1 1 

Becker, lb 3 9 1 1 

Totals 28 2 24 10 5 

Albright 0000000 0—0 

Lebanon Valley 1 011 x— 12 

Two-base hit, Boran. Three-base hit, 
Billett. Stolen bases, Boran 3, Barthold 2. 
Struck out, by Billett 17, Fatzinger 8, 
Felty 2. Base on balls, off Billett 1, Fat- 
zinger 5. Umpire, Gallagher. 



MAY DAY DANCERS 

BATTLE ICY WINDS 



(Continued from Page One) 



followed their fancies and wandered 
about the campus. She was picturesque 
with a youngster in each hand,— the only 
way she could avoid a second miniature 
wrestling match. It was a relief when the 
presentation of gifts was made with no 
one stumbling. And the court looked 
lovely in their cool— or were they cold— 
gauzy blue chiffon gowns. 



It was heard that the youngsters did 
not believe that Maxine Earley was Alice 
in Wonderland because Maxine had short 
black hair. And the mothers in the crowd 
were worrying because of pneumonia and 
rheumatism while Alice slept. 

The May dance was very sedate but 
the winding of the pole did not resemble 
the pictures and descriptions one has read. 
Anyway, Kanoff narrowly escaped be- 
ing hanged. 

In the audience's opinion the flowers' 
dance was second only to the cavortings 
of Boy Blue and Bo Peep. The Brown- 
ies' leap frog and the wolves' chase were 
very interesting. If "pigs is pigs'' then 
L. V. C. will have to build a sty for some. 
Was the shoe too big for Emma Rein- 
bold or was she too big for the shoe? At 
any rate the Brownies seemed unable to 
pull the shoe out on the field. One of 
the Old Woman's boys, Ethel Wilt, did 
not like to wear shorts because she is a 
girl. It did not matter, however, because 
her friend did not arrive until after May 
Day. 

The whole program was enjoyed by 
the prospective students. It is hnp^d that 
it was not just reaction from their har- 
rowing morning. One newcomer con- 
fessed that he blindly??? walked into the 
dining hall at 11:15 A. M. with the regu- 
lar students, and at 1:15 he again en- 
tered, this time with his group. 

Professor Shaar and Miss Kenyon as 
well as the costume committee deserve 
our heartiest appreciation. The fresh- 
men and Louise Gillan and Robert Cas- 
sel must be thanked for their efforts on 
the campus. By the way, "Bob" remarked 
that it was easier to collect the town kid- 
dies and pay them with a piece of candy 
to work for him than to get the freshmen. 
And, with commendation to all for an- 
other successful May Day, you will have 
to pardon me now while I run home lor 
a clean handkerchief. Sniff! Sniff! 



The Logical Place for L. V. C. 
Students to Buy 

BOOKS & SUPPLIES 
ESBENSHADE'S 

38 N. 8th St., Lebanon, Pa. 



KREAMER BROS. 



Leonard Elec. Refrigerators 
Hoover Electric Sweepers 
Easy Electric Washers 
Gas and Coal Stoves 
Rugs and Linoleums 



Furniture - - Undertaking 



Phone 14 4 ANNVILLE. PA. 



TOILET ARTICLES 

PATENT MEDICINES 
CIGARS - CIGARETTES 

ANDREW'S 
CUT RATE STORE 

OPPOSITE COURT HOUSE 

8TH a CUMBERLAND ST8. 

Lebanon, Pa. 
VISIT OUR FOUNTAIN 



THE BEST PLACE TO BUY 
BOOKS, STATIONERY and 
COLLEGE SUPPLIES 

BOLLMAN'S 

628 CUMBERLAND STREET 



"Always Reliable' 




For Recreation, Try 

ROEMIG'S 

BILLIARDS and BOWLING 



FOR QUALITY 

Baked Products 

PATRONIZE 

FINK'S BAKERY 

MAIN STREET 



D. L. Say lor & Sons 
CONTRACTORS 

LUMBER and COAL 
Annville, Pennsylvania 



Van Heusen Shirts 

'Cut Right . . . Fit Right' 
New Assortment of Spring 
NECKWEAR 
John Hirsh Dep't Store 



CLOTHING OF QUALITY 

J. So BASHORE 



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LEBANON 740 WALTON 520 WASHINGTON READING 



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Exj 



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Alumni Issue 



laftte Colktjiennt 

LEBANON VALLEY COLLEGE 



2,200 Copies 



VOL. XII 



ANNVILLE, PENNSYLVANIA, THURSDAY, MAY 16, 1935 



No. 4 



j^ew Moller Organ 
To Be Installed 
In Conservatory 

TRUSTEES APPROVE DEAL 

Expensive New Four-Manual In- 
strument to Rival Any in 
State 

Lebanon Valley College, following a 
special meeting of the finance committee 
n d board of trustees, signed a contract 
with the Moller Organ Company of Ha- 
gerstown, Md., on May 10, for the pur- 
chase of new four-manual pipe organ to 
replace the three manual organ in the 
chapel and Conservatory of Music. The 
new instrument, which can rightfully be 
called one of the most outstanding in the 
state, is now under construction and will 
be installed during the summer and be 
ready for use by the opening of the 1935- 
1936 school year. Additional voicing will 
be necessary before the organ installation 
can correctly be termed finished, however. 

The selection of the Moller organ was 
made after an extensive examination of 
instruments built by the five most impor- 
tant companies in the United States. The 
.i-uaon was due largely to the unques- 
tioned improvement in the tonal and me- 
chanical qualities demonstrated in some 
of the recent large installations. This is 
largely due to the work of Mr. R. O. 
Whitelegg, tonal director of the Moller 
Company, who came to this- country from 
'he Willis Organ Company of England. 
Mr. Whitelegg is responsible for the suc- 
cessful installation of the great Liverpool 
cathedral organ and other outstanding in- 
struments on the continent, and his ex- 
perience with these masterpieces has 
ma de him a valuable contributor to the 
art of organ building in America. 

The detailed specifications for the new 
0r 9an were made by R. Porter Campbell, 
Pressor of organ at Lebanon Valley 



Coll 

le 



e 9e, in consultation with Mr. White- 
a "d Mr. Ridgely of the Moller Com- 
^Y- In the instrument chosen, they 
p J e Ve en deavored to combine the princi- 
ca^h ° f tonal ensemble found in the best 
0r , edral or gans with the many beautiful 

fe«k> Stra " C ° lors and the mechanical P er " 
faJ° n which American organs are 

mou, resu should 9 ive an enor " 

(ers s sc ope in the softer and solo regis- 
' and also a well-balanced ensemble 

(Con «nued on Page 3, Column 1) 



RESIDENT'S CALENDAR 



lay in » 

j u ~Attended the inauguration 
' "ood Colleae's new president, 
, Dr ' Stahr. 

l4 ~ Addressed the State W. C. 
t . It d 

5j w ' Kegional Conference at 
, Cr anto n . 

Cq °~Addressed the Franklin 
at w y Sunday School Convention 
"a y Iiams on, Pa. 

y i7-_\ ViU deliver the Good Sa _ 



^aritan u 
^ d ' hospital Commencement 

r . ess at the Woman's Club in 

JfT * non - 

y is \x 

C ou n r addre s* the Schuylkill 
^''n G Leban ° n Valley A,umni at 



rove Park. 



Bretu ~*^ U1 preach at the United 
D, r Church in Washington, 



Messages To L. V. C. Alumni 



FROM THE PRESIDENT 

OF THE COLLEGE 



With this special issue of the La Vie 
Collegienne the president is glad to have 
the opportunity of extending his personal 
greetings to the loyal alumni of the col- 
lege. The buildings located on the camp- 
us at Annville do not constitute the real 
Lebanon Valley — the real Lebanon Val- 
ley is a living organism; it consists of 
faculty, students, and our graduates of 
former years. Wherever the living prod- 
ucts of the college are, there is the col- 
lege in the truest sense. 

Even since the graduation of the first 
class in 1870, a steady and ever-increas- 
ing stream of life has been flowing from 

(Continued on Page 2, Column 3) 



FROM THE PRESIDENT 

OF THE ALUMNI 



A cordial invitation is extended to all 
members of the Alumni Association to 
attend the annual spring reunion to be 
held Saturday, June 8, 1935, at Lebanon 
Valley College. Your committees, who 
have planned for the day, have worked 
faithfully, and I feel sure that we will en- 
joy one of the greatest Alumni reunions 
in the history of our association. 

The Alumni banquet will be held in the 
Her she y Community Building dining hall 
instead of the Park Golf Club dining hall. 
This is the only major change in the or- 
der of events for the day. You will find 
the complete program of the day's events 

(Continued on Page 4, Column 1) 



Junior Promenade 
Ends Dance Season 



KIRKPATRICK LEADS PROM 



Beautiful Hershey Ballroom Is 
Scene of Highly Successful 
Final Dance 

The curtain of the social season for the 
present school year was lowered at mid- 
night May 10 with the last dance of the 
season, the Junior Prom. 

In the beautiful, modernly redecorated 
Hershey Park Ballroom the trippers of 
the light fantastic held sway for a perfect 
evening of delightful dance rhythm fur- 
nished by Ira Bowman's orchestra. Pro- 
fessor Shaar, director of May Day fes- 
tivities on the campus, ably conducted 
the grand march which was headed by 
Prom Leader William Kirkpatrick and 
his partner, Louise Shearer. 

The chaperones for the dance were Dr. 
and Mrs. Paul Wallace, Dr. and Mrs. 
Paul Wagner, Professor and Mrs. Ed- 
ward Rutledge, Professor and Mrs. Sam- 
continued on Page 4, Column 4) 



Readers' Club Meets 
For Final Session 



INTERESTING PROGRAM 



German-Banned Books Furnish 
Theme For Evening's 
Discussion 



The Readers' Club met at the home of 
Dr. and Mrs. Wallace on May 7 for its 
last meeting of the year. There was a 
short but thoroughly interesting program. 
\n entirely new theme was chosen for the 
evening's discussion — "Books That Are 
Banned in Germany." 

The first book to be considered was 
"Von Hindenburg" by Emil Ludwig. 
Theodore Loose, in his discussion of the 
book, spoke of it as it centers around the 
four main situations of Hindenburg's life: 
first, his career as field marshal in the 
war; second, a "passive spectator" in the 
new republic; third, a constitutional dic- 
tator during his presidency; and fourth, 
his eclipse by Hitler. Von Hindenburg 
is presented as a man who never admit- 
ted defeat. Mr. Loose told of the under- 
standing of the German people which 
this book gives to the reader. The book 
is claimed by reviewers to be the best of 
Ludwig's books. 

Harold Philipps then gave an excellent 
review of the book "Forty Days of Musa 

(Continued on Page 3, Column 5) 



NOTICE! ALUMNI! 



Do you know of any prospective 
students with exceptional scholastic 
or athletic qualifications? Have you 
tried to interest them in Lebanon Val- 
ley College, your Alma Mater? Send 
along all the information, a letter to 
the college office or your alumni sec- 
retary will provide the means of 
placing all of us on the job. 

D. K. Shroyer. 



Football With P. M. C. 
Next Homecoming Day 



The Pennsylvania Military College 
football game to be played on the Leba- 
non Valley College athletic field Satur- 
day, November 2, at 2:00 P. M. has been 
selected as the Third Annual Homecom- 
ing game for next fall. 

The many alumni and friends who were 
on hand for the Second Annual Home- 
coming game in 1934 were favorably im- 
pressed with the first attempt to play a 
home football game in Annville. The new 
stands accommodate approximately 1500 
and efforts are being made to secure addi- 
tional bleachers for the 1935 season. 

The homecoming game this year will 
be one of the toughest games on the 
schedule. Jud Timm's Pennsylvania Mili- 
tary College Cadets were undefeated last 
year and unscored on until the Lebanon 
Valley game when, aided by perfect in- 
terference, Ross Sheesley, diminutive Fly- 
ing Dutchman halfback, intercepted a pass 
and galloped 99 yards to score. 

In addition to the homecoming game, 
Coach Frock's chargers will play Drexel 
Institute and Albright College on the 
Annville gridiron. Alumni and friends 
are urged to support the 1935 edition of 
the fighting Flying Dutchmen. 

(Continued on Page 4, Column 4) 



KALO ELECTIONS 



The following members were elected 
to rerve as Kalo officers during the fall 
term of the coming school year: Presi- 
dent. ). William Kirkpatrick, Jr.; vice- 
pre ident. Anthony Jagnesak; treasurer, 
Boyd Sponaugle; recording secretary, 
fohn Brosious; corresponding secretary, 
Wilbur Leech; chaplain, Harold Hollings- 
worth; pianist, Stuart Kutz; sergeants-at- 
arms, Clarence Aungst, David Byerly and 
Ralph Billett. These elective officers will 
be duly and regularly installed in the near 
future. 



NOTICE OF DUES 



Have you paid your alumni dues of 
$2.00? Mrs. Lillian K. Shroyer, cor- 
responding secretary, reports that thus 
far the prompt response from the 
alumni has been most gratifying. If 
you have overlooked this request do 
your best to arrange for payment in 
the near future. Each two dollars aids 
greatly in the advancement of the in- 
terests of our association and our Al- 
ma Mater. 

D. K. Shroyer. 



Alumni Giving Fund 

Alumni of Lebanon Valley College 
have responded favorably to the plea for 
donations to the Annual Alumni Giving 
Fund. To date ninety-two graduates and 
former students have contributed approxi- 
mately $800.00 to be used to help deserv- 
ing students who need financial assistance. 
The complete list of contributors, divided 
according to classes, is as follows: 

1879. Mrs. Clara Craumer Leavens; 
1885, Mrs. Ida Speck Davis, Dr. J. A. 
Lyter; 1894, Oscar E. Good; 1899, Dr. 
Harry M. Imboden, Mary Kreider Steh- 
man Longenecker, Rev. G. Mahlon Mil- 
ler; 1900, Mrs. Enid Daniel Jones, Dr. 
H. H. Shenk, Mrs. Lillian Kreider Shroy- 
er; 1901, H. H. Baish, Dr. R. R. Butter- 
wick; 1902, Edith Myers, Dr. S. H. Der- 
ickson; 1903, Mrs. Edith Spangler Es- 
benshade, J. Walter Esbenshade. 

1904, Alfred K. Mills; 1906, Dr. An- 
drew Bender, Mrs. Lucille Mills Gerbe- 
rich, John B. Hambright, Rev. J. Warren 
Kaufman; 1907, Mrs. Elizabeth Stehman 
Cowling, Helen Ethel Myers; 1908, Mrs. 
Neda Knaub Hambright, Mrs. Edith 
Frantz Mills; 1910, Lena May Hoerner, 
Rev. Filmore T. Kohler, Dr. Wilbur C. 
Plummer, Victor O. Wiedler; 1911, Rev. 
Paul R. Koontz; 1912, Mrs. Sarah Strick- 
ler Bachman, Earl H. Carmany, Prof. S. 
O. Grimm, Mrs. Elizabeth Lau Koontz; 

(Continued on Page 4, Column 3) 



'Conserv' Prepares 
For Music Festival 



PLAN CONCERTO, CONCERT 



Miss Ethel Keller and College 
Band Share Big Music 
Event 



Ethel Keller will present on Friday af- 
ternoon of May 24 the famous Schumann 
Concerto in A minor with orchestra ac- 
companiment—directed by Professor D. 
Clark Carmean as the first part of the 
annual spring music festival of the con- 
servatory. The concert has three move- 
ments, which are all exceptionally well 
interpreted by our promising Ethel Kel- 
ler. The first movement is a fast but ten- 
der melodied movement named the Alle- 
gro affetuoso; the second, or Intermezzo, 
serves as a rest period while the Allegro 
vivoce— another fast movement, closes 
t-'ie concerto. The orchestra will also pre- 
;ent other numbers such as the Clock and 
the Dresden Figures with Sara Light as 
the piano soloist. 

The festival will continue in the eve- 
ning with a concert by the Lebanon Val- 
ley band, directed by Prof. Rutledge. The 
band has prepared a splendid program 
with several solo numbers featuring Em- 
ily Kindt, xylophonist, and Earl Unger, 
cornetist. There will be no admission 
charge. 



Dr. Weygandt Will 
Give The Address 
At Commencement 



IS U. OF P. PROFESSOR 



Subject of His Speech Will Be 
"The Great Gift of 
Caring" 



Dr. Cornelius Weygandt, A. B., Ph. 
D., Litt. D., LL. D., Professor of Eng- 
lish Literature at the University of Penn- 
sylvania, Philadelphia, will deliver the 
address at the Sixty-sixth Commencement 
to be held in the College Church of the 
United Brethren in Christ, Monday, June 
10, at 10:00 a. m„ eastern standard time. 

Dr. Weygandt's address, "The Great 
Gift of Caring," promises to be one of the 
most outstanding of the school year. The 
students and faculty of Lebanon Valley 
College were well pleased with his lecture 
"Poets Off Parade," delivered in the col- 
lege chapel during the fall. He received 
much praise for the clever way in which 
he handled and presented his valuable 
and. interesting material. 

Beginning as a newspaper man in the 
employ of the Philadelphia Recnrrj ^nH 
Philadelphia Evening Telegraph, 1892- 
1897, Dr. Weygandt has had a colorful 
career. He became an instructor in Eng- 
lish at the University of Pennsylvania in 
1897 and held that position until 1904. 
From 1904 to 1907 he was associate pro- 
fessor of English and since that time he 
has served as Professor of English. Dr. 
Weygandt is an active and influential 
member of the Modern Language Asso- 
ciation of America, the American Orni- 
thologists' Union, and the Delaware Val- 
ley Ornithological Club. His social life is 
confined to his interest and membership in 
the Franklin Inn of Philadelphia. 

In addition to serving on the faculty of 
the state institution of higher learning, 
Dr. Weygandt has made a number of 
valuable contributions to the literary 
world. His "Irish Plays and Playwrights" 
appeared in 1913, "A Century of the 
English Novel" in 1925, "Tuesdays at 
Ten" in 1928, "The Red Hills" in 1929, 
and his most recent, "The Wissahickon 
Hills," came off the press in 1930. He is 
also ranked among the leading literary 
criticis of the day. 



BACCALAUREATE 
SERMON 



Dr. R. R. Butterwick, A. B., A. M., 

D. D., Professor of Philosophy and 
Religion, will deliver the baccalaureate 
sermon to the graduates of the class of 
1935 Sunday, June 9, at 10:30 a. m., 

E. S. T, in the College Church of the 
United Brethren in Christ. 

Dr. Butterwick has been a member 
of the Lebanon Valley College faculty 
since 1921. Before that time he served 
as pastor of the Palmyra Church of 
the United Brethren in Christ, 1901- 
1906, field agent of Lebanon Valley 
College, 1906-1907, pastor at Schuyl- 
kill Haven, Pa., 1907-1908, Mount- 
ville. Pa., 1908-1915, and Hershey, 
Pa., 1916-1921. He has gained quite 
a reputation as a sound and logical 
thinker and his interpretation of the 
baccalaureate sermon is expected to 
be one of the highlights of the com- 
mencement program. 



PAGE TWO 



LA VIE COLLEGIENNE, THURSDAY, MAY 16, 1935 



la Viz Collestemte 

ESTABLISHED 1925 



A weekly publication by the Under- 
graduate Students of Lebanon 
Valley College 



EDITORIAL STAFF 

David Yake. '36 Editor-in-Chief 

Lester Krone, '36..._ Associate Editor 

Richard Baus, '37 Managing Editor 



REPORTORI AL STAFF 

Louise Gillan, '36 
Marian Leisey, '3G 
Maxine Earley, '37 
Grace Naugle, '37 
Martha Baney, '38 
Jean McKeag, '38 
Paul Schach, '38 
Emma Mary Smyser, '38 

Calvin Spitler, '38... General Reporters 

Sylvia Evelev. '36 

Robert Spohn, '36™ Features 

Helen Summy, '36 - Conservatory 

William Earnest, '37 Athletics 

Eleanor Lynch, '37 Faculty and Alumni 

Duey Unger, '37- Kalozetean 

June Gingrich, '36 _ Delphian 

Louis Straub, '37 - - Philokosmian 

Jane Shellenberger, '36 - Clionian 



BUSINESS STAFF 

Albert Anderson, '36 Business Manager 

Robert Kell, '37 Assistant Business Manager 

Elwood Needy, '37 Circulation Manager 

David Byerly, '38.. Asst. Circulation Manager 



Single Copies.. 
Subscription — 



5 cents 

,..$1.00 per year 



Entered at the Annville, Pa., post 
office as second class matter, under the 
Act of March 3, 1879. 



THURSDAY, MAY 16, 1935 



Welcome, Alumni! 

With this alumni issue the La Vie 
Collegienne takes the opportunity to 
welcome to Lebanon Valley's campus all 
graduates, new and old, who are plan- 
ning to attend the many functions planned 
for them during Commencement Week, 
and to urge those who have not yet 
planned to do so to put forth every effort 
to be here at school when all the old 
crowd assembles. 

You grads have all been through a 
Commencement Week and you know the 
warm-hearted spirit of welcome that 
awaits you, and we can assure you that 
an interesting and delightful program of 
events has been scheduled for your bene- 
fit. 

The La Vie Collegienne also wishes 
to thank the Alumni Association and 
especially Mr. David K. Shroyer for the 
part that each has had in preparation 
of this issue. Mr. L. P. Clements, the 
college publicity director, deserves our 
thanks for the preparation of many of the 
news articles pertaining to the Alumni. 

Remember, Alumni, we'll be seeing you 
Commencement Week! 



L. V. Commerce Club 
Holds Final Banquet 

Attended by much festivity, the Com- 
merce Club held its first and last big so- 
cial event of this year, a banquet, at 
Pearson's restaurant in Hershey, Tues- 
day evening, May 14. 

The guest speaker of the evening was 
Mr. Charles L. Procasco, certified public 
accountant of Harrisburg, and also a bril- 
liant and clever speaker well known in 
his field. His topic, well-suited for this 
group of business administration students, 
was "Ethics in Business." 

Among the other notable guests, in ad- 
dition to the regular students of the busi- 
ness administration department who 
formed this group for social and intellec- 
tual experiences were Prof. Stokes, Prof. 
Gingrich, ana" Mr. Kishbaugh, who spoke 
to the Commerce Club just a few weeks 
ago. 



ALUMNI NOTES 



Two interesting branch alumni organi- 
zation meetings were held during the 
month of February: 

On the 19th of that month the alumni 
met at Dayton, Ohio, with President 
Lynch as guest. Bishop A. R. Clippin- 
ger, '05, served as toastmaster. The Rev. 
Dr. John A. Lyter, '85, spoke on "The 
College Fifty Years Ago." The Rev. V. 
O. Weidler, '10, spoke on "The Humor- 
ous Side of College Life." Dr. W. G. 
Clippinger, '99, president of Otterbein 
College, discussed "Recent Trends of the 
Liberal Arts Movement," and Dr. Lynch 
on "The Present Status of the College." 

The following officers were elected: 
President, Bishop A. R. Clippinger, 05; 
vice-president, Rev. V. O. Weidler, '10; 
secretary-treasurer, John B. Lyter, '14. 



The alumni of the Lehigh Valley held 
an organization meeting at the Hotel 
Traylor, Allentown, February 19. Fred 
Weiss Light of the class of 1900, gave 
interesting reminiscences of college days 
more than thirty years ago. Dr. Shenk 
represented the college. Officers elected 
were as follows: President, Dr. Joseph 
D. Rutherford, '17, Allentown; vice-presi- 
dent, Rev. Chester Rettew, '12, Allen- 
town; secretary, Miss Hilda Buckley, '32, 
Allentown; treasurer, Miss Irene Peter, 
'30. 



The alumni of Schuylkill county will 
hold an outing at Twin Grove Park on 
Saturday, May 18, according to the an- 
nouncement of Ellwood Bodenhorn, '16, 
president of the organization. 



The Lebanon Valley Club of Balti- 
more, Md., held its annual dinner Friday, 
April 26. Approximately forty alumni 
and friends were present. Dr. Lynch, '18, 
delivered greetings from the college, and 
Dr. Bender, '06, spoke of the improve- 
ment in the equipment and offerings of 
the chemistry department and college in 
general. Mrs. Ruth Engle Bender, '15, 
gave a very interesting report of the 
progress in the conservatory of music and 
also played several delightful piano selec- 
tions. Mrs. Edith Gingrich, '11, of Pal- 
myra, Pa., sang a number of soprano se- 
lections that were very well received. L. 
P. Clements, '33, displayed several reels 
of motion pictures that had been taken 
on the campus and at the various football 
games. Rev. Paul Koontz, 'li, spoke of 
the plans of the Baltimore group. Mrs. 
Edith Lehman Bartlett, '13, presided at 
the meeting. 



A meeting of the Berks County Alumni 
Branch will be held at the Berkshire hotel 
on May 23. 

The following are the officers: Presi- 
dent, William N. Martin; secretary, Mrs. 
Meta Burbeck Bauer; treasurer, Mrs. Vir- 
ginia Smith Ruth. 



Officers of the York County Alumni 
Branch: President, Rev. Paul E. V. 
Shannon; vice-president, David Fink; 
secretary, Florence Mentz. 



Word has been received of the election 
of the following officers of the various 
alumni association organizations. Alumni 
in the respective areas who are desirous 
of obtaining information concerning the 
group meetings, plans, etc., should con- 
sult the group officer named below. 

Philadelphia Branch— President, Dr. 
Reuben Williams, '17, Philadelphia, Pa. 

York County— President, Rev. Paul E. 
V. Shannon, '18, Dallastown, Pa. 

New England— President, W. O. Ellis, 
'11, Concord, Massachusetts; secretary, 
Mildred Christiansen, '33, Randolph, 
Mass. 

Baltimore— Secretary, Mrs. Edith Leh- 
man Bartlett, '13. 

Western Maryland — Secretary, Mrs. 
Mary Wygand Coblentz, '15, Middle- 
town, Md. 



Information Wanted 



The Office of the Registrar desires 
information concerning the where- 
abouts and activities of the following 
alumni with whom contact has been 
lost: 

J. Witmer Allwein '30, Mr. and 
Mrs. Allen U. Baer '98 and '96, G. E. 
Barber '04, Mrs. Matilda Bohr Ran- 
dall '16, William M. Clarkin, Flor- 
ence Copenhaver '07, Helen E. Copen- 
haver '30, J. Robert Eshleman '31, 
Mrs. Mary Fegan Snyder '24, Estella 
Felty '16, Ruth L. Garner '33, Ervin 
Hatz '08, Russell M. Henne '33, Jesse 
Hostetter '05, Mrs. Ruth Huber Aishe 
'17, James W. Jamison '15, Joji Kin- 
goro Irie '95, Elias J. Kline '27, Robert 
T. Knouff '27. 

Miss Jennie M. Leslie '04, Mrs. 
Jane Lindsay Hoppis 18, Helen I. 
Longenecker '26, Isaac F. Loos 02, 
Dorothy C. Mancha '24, Mary E. Mc- 
Curdy '30. Willis E. McNelly '16, 
Oren G. Meyers '00, Luke Shigeyuki 
Mimura '27, Andres L. Morales '32, 
Paul D. Peiffer '34, Palmer E. Poff 
'29, Mrs. Violet Prout Toole '09, Wm. 
J. Sanders '02, Mrs. Florence Seifried 
Fulweiler '24, Rev. Irvin S. Seitz '07, 
Nora Steffey '91, Ruth A. Strubhar 
'29, Mrs. Edna Tittle Snider '22, J. 
Lon Whitmoyer '79. 

Any news or clues will be greatly 
appreciated. 



PRESIDENT LYNCH'S 

MESSAGE TO ALUMNI 



(Continued from Page One) 



this fountain-head of higher learning. In 
all the honorable professions and occupa- 
tions and in every part of the world the 
sons and daughters of our Alma Mater 
are doing their share of the world's work 
all the more adequately because of the 
knowledge, the skills, the inspirations, 
and the Christian ideals they acquired 
here as students. 

I wish to call your attention to several 
encouraging signs that point in the direc- 
tion of a larger and better college. The 
first of these signs is the increasing inter- 
est and the growing activity among our 
various alumnal groups. It has been my 
happy privilege to attend a number of 
these sectional meetings, and I have been 
deeply impressed and greatly encouraged 
by the enthusiastic spirit that pervaded 
those gatherings. Not only did I hear 
gratifying testimonials of appreciation 
from alumni who are realizing as never 
before what the college has meant to 
them, but better still, there has been un- 
mistakable evidence of a general lively 
interest in the present status as well as the 
future development of our institution. 
This revival of interest is already bearing 
fruitage in the coming to the college of 
splendid young people from the homes, 
the schools, and the immediate communi- 
ties of our alumnal friends and boosters. 
Alumni of other schools are exerting eve- 
ry effort to direct high-school students 
under their supervision to their respective 
Alma Maters, and in these days of unpre- 
cedented competition among the colleges 
we are expecting our alumni to put forth 
every legitimate effort to induce promis- 
ing students to come to Lebanon Valley 
College. 

If you have an inferiority complex with 
reference to your old college, get rid of 
it quickly; as a good liberal arts college, 
we can stand up with the rest of the small 
colleges of our type without apologizing 
for our existence or the quality of our 
graduates. It is true that we. do need 
several buildings urgently, particularly a 
gymnasium and a science hall, and we 
should by all means renovate the men's 
dormitory as soon as funds are available; 
but one of the best ways to prepare for 
the improvement of our physical plant is 
to increase our educational efficiency and 
attract a larger number of good students 
here who can pay their bills and thus in- 
crease our income. H6w many good stu- 
dents have you sent here since your 
graduation? If you love your college, say 



t with a student occasionally. 

Another favorable sign has been the 
ready response of our alumni to the An- 
nual Alumni Giving Fund. Practically 
all the colleges are resorting to similar 
appeals to their former students for the 
purpose of supplementing the diminishing 
returns from shrinking endowment funds 
and decreasing student payments (due 
largely to the scholarship racket) by a'n- 
nual alumni contributions to the general 
expenses or to restricted projects. This 
first year we have applied our subscrip- 
tions to student aid in the form of loans 
or direct gifts. The total amount received 
to date is $780. Some of you wrote me 
saying that you could not afford to give 
very much; but even your small gift was 
very much appreciated, and it no doubt 
represented considerable sacrifice on your 
part, and surely just as much devotion as 
some of the larger gifts. In fact one of 
the surprising and disappointing revela- 
tions in tabulating the receipts of this 
project has been the apparent indiffer- 
ence of some of those alumni who re- 
ceived the largest concessions during their 
years as students in the college. If the 
college is to grow, there must be more 
than sentimentality in those well-known 
words: "Full well we know the debt we 
owe to dear old L. V. C." The least the 
former beneficiaries of the generosity of 
the college can do is to make it possible 
for some student who is poor and worthy 
to continue in college by augmenting his 
insufficient funds with your own personal 
contribution. No one should ever com- 
pare Lebanon Valley College unfavor- 
ably with other colleges without com- 
paring his efforts with the efforts of the 
alumni of those institutions that seem to 
be superior to our own institution in some 
respects. It is hoped that our graduates 
and friends will be just as generous as 
the alumni of other colleges are said to 
be, and that they will rise to meet the 
challenge of the depression by helping 
the college that helped them. 

The last evidence that I desire to pre- 
sent is the fact that more of our alumni 
are attending college events of general 
and special interest to them. May Day, 
society anniversaries, athletic events, 
commencement, Alumni Day, and the an- 
nual Home-Coming Day are drawing the 
old grads as well as the more recent ones 
back to the campus in larger numbers. 



This is helping to keep the old spi r j t 7^ 
and when our alumni meet the n ' Ve ' 
faculty and the student body their ^ 
siasm grows, and with increasing nt ^u- 
ciation of the progress that is bein„ ^ Pr ' 



,n 8 "ad 

be: 

refer to Lebanon Valley as their a 



they become prouder than ever bef 



Mater. I hope that you will be 



*ith 



for our coming commencement activir 
Mrs. Lynch and I are preparing (• 8 " 
ceive you in our home on the after ? 



win 9 th. 



give 



of Alumni Day, June 8, folio 
class-day exercises. Come and 
the pleasure of shaking your hand 
chatting about old friends, old p ] a " 
and all the old good times. 

Clyde A. Lynch 



Commencement Week 

The Sixty-sixth Annual Commencement 
Program promises to be one of the m 0s , 
attractive ever planned by the Annvill e 
institution. Starting Thursday, J Une ^ 
with the President's Reception to the Se 
nior Class, a well-rounded schedule [ 
events will take up practically every mi n 
ute of the time until the completion f 
the Sixty-sixth Commencement exercises 
which will be held Monday, June 10, at 
ten o'clock, E.S.T., in the college church 
of the United Brethren in Christ. 

The program in detail is as follows: 
Thursday, June 6—6:00 p.m.— President's 

Reception to the Senior Class. 
Friday, June 7—11:00 a.m.— Meeting f 
the Board of Trustees. 
8:00 p.m.— Commencement Recital by 
Students of the Conservatory of Music. 
Saturday, June 8— Alumni Day. 

10:00 a.m.— Alumni Association Meet- 
ing. 

12:30 p.m. — Alumni Luncheon. 
2:00 p.m.— Class Day Exercises. 
3:00 p.m.— President's Reception to 
Alumni. 

3:30 p.m.— Tennis Match, L. V. vs. 
Alumni. 

6:00 p.m.— Annual Alumni Banquet. 

Sunday, June 9—10:30 a.m.— Baccalau- 
reate Sermon, Dr. R. R. Butterwick, 
A. B., A. M., D. D., B. D., Professor 
of Philosophy and Religion. 

Monday, June 10—10:00 a.m.— Sixty- 
sixth Commencement Address by Dr. 
Cornelius Weygandt, A. B., Ph. D.. 
Litt. D., LL. D., Professor of English 
Literature, University of Pennsylvania. 



SAINT JOHNSBURY ACADEMY 

Saint Johnsbury, Vermont 

An Old New England Academy in an Old New England Town. Thorough 
preparation for college. Commercial courses. Dormitories for boys and girls. 
Tuition $550 covers all expenses. Scholarship aid for worthy boys and girls. 
WRITE PRINCIPAL STANLEY R. OLDHAM. L. V. C. OS 



last 
round up 

Now — before the college year 
ends, make a list of your friends' 
home telephone numbers. By 
telephone you can always 
keep in touch. It's easy to 
arrange week-end reunions. 

• Call 100 miles for 60 rents by 
Day Rate; for 50 cents by 
Evening Rate; for 35 cents by 
Night Rate. (Stat ion to Station 
calls — 3-minute connections.) 



The Bell Telephone Company of Pennsylvania 



No. ao 



LA VIE COLLEGIENNE, THURSDAY, MAY 16, 1935 



PAGE THREE 



id 



c ug q U ehanna, Ursinus 
gow To Valley Team 



01U< 



and White Lead League 
fj a lf Game Ahead of 
Bucknell 



fwo victories last week, one over Sus- 



ue hann 



a and the other other Ursinus, 



ran 
5 tre ; 
them 



t he Lebanon Valley nine's winning 
Y to f° ur straight games, three of 
being registered in league encoun- 



ters 



to gi ve 



the Blue and White diamond 



its first place in the Eastern Pennsyl- 
■ a Collegiate League, one-half game 
(ea d of the Bucknell Bisons, who have 
two and, like the Valleyites, have 
, to taste defeat. 

Susquehanna succumbed before the 
masterful hurling of John Witter, being 
hut out with only three hits while the 
Blue and White stickmen, led by Char- 
lie Rust and "Butch" Barthold, were tal- 
lying 



six counters on seven hits to land 
a 6.0 decision. 

Some timely hitting off Roy Johnson 
an d his Ursinus successors to the mound, 
Beyer and Trumbare, gave the Valley- 
j tcs a 5-3 decision over the Bears last 
Friday after the Collegeville baseballers 
had nicked the offerings of Paul Billett 
for three runs in the early innings. 

Johnson clouted a home run in the sec- 
ond inning to tally the first alien counter, 
and two more runs were chalked up for 
the Bears on three hits in the fifth ses- 
sion. In the home half of the fifth, the 
Valleyites finally solved the offerings of 
)ohnson and drove him off the hill with 
four hits that counted three runs. The 
winning tally was scored off Beyer in the 
seventh inning after the Ursinus hurler 
had pulled himself out of a hole in the 
sixth. Patrizio's hit between first and sec- 
ond scored Rust with the fourth tally to 
put the Valleyites ahead. "Charlie" had 
gotten to first on a base on balls, and 
moved to second on Smith's perfect sacri- 
fice bunt, dashing all the way home on 
Patrizio's wallop. Another run was 
scored before the side was retired; an 
error by the catcher on Witters third 
strike permitting Patrizo to cross the 
plate with an extra counter. 

Billett retired the Bears in regular order 
in the eighth and ninth to assure a Valley 
victory. The L. V. C. twirler allowed 
ei ght hits but was steady in the pinches, 
fanning nine of the opponents. Witter 
' f d the batters with three singles in four 
taps to the plate. Arndt got two blows, 
*e one a double in the midst of the fifth 
inning rally. Mentzer accounted for the 
J on gest Valley hit of the day, a poke to 
^. also in the fifth session, on which 
( e Blue and White catcher got three 
base s. The Lebanon Valley nine played 
^oHess ball behind Billett, while the Ur-- 

mus aggregation was guilty of two mis- 
plays. 

e schedule for this week includes 
S an *s with Drexel at Philadelphia and 
me r q r hanna on the home field, the for- 

nonl 3 league game and the latter 
^ a Que. Box scores of the Susque- 

n "a and Ursinus games will be found 

Sewl *re in these sheets. 



C0 NSERVATORY GETS 

NEW MOLLER ORGAN 

Continued from Page One) 
in Hich 

to gre the to nes blend and build up in- 
Th &at brill iance and majesty. 

stPa tflht °' 9an wil1 be almost entirel y 

H Urn Use that is - ^ere will be but a mini- 
tion s J* of unif ication and duplexed ac- 
9cner.i ° f which tend to detract in the 



neral 
,et ach t 



^semble. The console will be 



b c divid ec j Ut ^ organ chambers will not 
Hain g ro ' a " divisions are to be in one 
Stand Poi° UP t0 assure the best from the 
s Ml, *H ° f ense mble and tuning. The 
>° Sed ' tfi ° ancl choir organs will be en- 

e thr ee e 9reat and pedal ""enclosed. 
Sle me e encl °sed chambers will rupply 
\ a Su ^ s of dynamic expression, leav- 

C '° Sed t Clent number °f r « n ks unen- 
ins ure the desired freedom of 



tonal speech in the ensemble. 

Through the voicing of Mr. Wn.'clegg, 
much of the opaque 8-foot Diapason tone 
will be eliminated as will also rlie reeds 
on the great. As designed, the great will 
have a flue-colored chorus while the reeds 
are largely reserved for the swell and 
solo organs, making the divisions truly 
contrasting in color and dynamics. The 
purpose of the diapason mixtures, of 
which there will be one three-rank on 
each of the swell, solo, and great, and a 
two-rank on the pedal, will be to do away 
largely with the muddiness of general ef- 
fect, replacing it with this better ensem- 
ble which provides opportunity for clar- 
ity and brilliance in playing and lound- 
ing out of tone. There will be a string 
chorus on the choir. 

The console will have in all fo ir man- 
uals and pedals and will be equipped with 
the most recently developed mechanical 
devices. These include 88 draw stop 
knobs: 33 couplers; 50 combination pis- 
tons; ten additional duplicate toe-stands 
for operating full organ combinations; the 
usual shoe cresendos effecting choir, 
swell, solo, and register; sfzorzando pedal 
and piston; general cancel piston; all- 
shutters-to-swell-shoe coupler; 4 rever- 
sibles coupling pedal to great, swell, 
choir, and solo; electric clock; combina- 
tion lock; silver contacts; Deagan chimes 
and harp. The last-named is a personal 
gift of Mr. M. P. Moller, the builder. 
Grille casing will be used entirely. 

When the new organ is installed the 
Lebanon Valley College Conservatory of 
Music will be ranked among 'he best 
equipped music schools in the country. 
The organ itself will compare favorably 
in appearance, mechanical qualities, and 
clarity and delicacy of tone with any of 
its size in the United States. 



SUMMARIES OF L. V. C. GAMES WITH SUSQUEHANNA AND URSINUS 



Susquehanna 



Spongier, 2b 
Martinec, c . 
Eisenhower, 1 
Anderson, If 



Lebanon Valley 

r. h. o. a. 

Rust, ss 3 3 11 

Patrizio, If .... 10 10 

Bartolet, lb .... 6 

Boran, 2b 

Capka, 2b .... 114 5 

Barthold, cf .... 12 2 

Witter, p 1 

Mentzer, c .... 10 

Billett, rf 

Sheesley, rf .. 1 

Arndt, 3b 3 2 

Totals 6 7 27 9 

Lebanon Valley 2 

Susquehanna 



Error — Rust. Two base hit— Rust. Three base hit 
—Barthold. Home run— Barthold. Struck out^by 
Witter 10, Yaros 2, Badger 6. Base on balls— off 
Witter 4, Badger 3. Hit by pitcher— Mentzer, Billett. 



Badger, p .. 
Yaros, p ... 
Maguire, rf 

Totals ... 



r. 


n. 


o. 


a. 





o 


o 


2 





1 


3 


5 


. 





10 


1 


3 





11 











1 








1 


1 


2 











3 





1 




















. 





1 








3 


27 


13 


3 


1- 


6 







0- 








Lebanon Valley 

r. h. o. a. 
1 3 1 
1 


3 



Rust, ss 1 

Smith, If 

Patrizio, lb . 
Barthold, cf . 
Bartolet, lb . 
Witter, rf ... 
Mentzer, c . 
Billett, p 



Arndt, 3b 1 




1 

1 8 
3 1 

1 10 


2 T 



Ursinus 

r. h. o. a. 

Fisher, c 15 1 

Sacks, If 1 1 

Calvert, lb .... 8 

Gensler, 2b .... 2 2 

McLa'hlin, 28 

Johnson, p-lf ..1 2 

Wildonger, cf 1 

Cubberly, ss 1 1 
Murray, rf .... 110 

Beyer, p ' 1 

Trumbare, p .. 1 

Tworzdlo, 3b.. 12 1 







Totals 5 9 27 



Totals 3 8 24 12 

0- 



Ursinus 1 002000 0—3 

L. V. C 00003020 x- 5 

Errors— Fisher, Gensler. Two base hits— Sacks, 
Arndt. Three base hits— Mentzer. Home run— John- 
son. Struck out— by Billett 9, Johnson 2, Beyer 1, 
Trumbare 3. Base on balls— off Billett 2, Beyer 2, 
Trumare 1. Hit by pitcher— Smith. Wild pitch—' 
Trumbare. 



Tennis Team Takes 

Two From Invaders 



EASTERN PENNA.. 
COLLEGE BASEBALL 



W. L. Pet. 

L. V. C 3 1.000 

Bucknell 2 1.000 

Ursinus 1 1 .500 

Albright 1 1 .500 

Gettysburg 1 .000 

Juniata 2 .000 

Drexel 2 .000 

May 15— L. V. vs. Drexel at Philadel- 
phia. 

May 17— Juniata vs. Ursinus at Col- 
legeville. 

May 18— Bucknell vs. Gettysburg at 
Gettysburg. 

May 18 — Juniata vs. Drexel at Phila- 
delphia. 



A pair of tennis matches last week 
resulted in wins for the Blue and White 
netmen over racquet-wielders from Juni- 
ata and Franklin and Marshall. 

The Juniata match on Wednesday was 
a cinch for the Valleyites, who won all 
of the seven matches and were forced to 
three sets in only two of them. Don- 
moyer had a particularly easy time with 
his opponent, running through twelve 
straight games in snappy fashion. 

The F. and M. encounter was an en- 
tirely different story. Donmoyer and Ax 
won their singles engagements, but Nye, 
Walborn, and Shroyer were defeated, 
leaving L. V. C. on the short end of a 
3-2 count before the doubles were con- 
tested. The No. 2 doubles match was 
played first, Walborn and Ax smashing 
through to victory over Schleager and 
Humphries to deadlock the affair at 3-all. 
Donmoyer and Nye landed the first set 
of their match with Hughes and Snyder 
at 6-3, and pulled the second set out of 
the fire at 8-6 after trailing 5-4 in games. 
The dual victory in the two-man compe- 
tition gave the Valleyites the match by 
the slim margin of 4-3. 

The racquetmen now sport a record of 
three wins against one loss in four match- 
es played out of the eight scheduled to 
date, four having been erased by rain. 



This week's listings include four match- 
es on foreign courts: Bucknell, Moravian, 
St. Joseph's, and Ursinus. Summaries: 

Lebanon Valley 7; Juniata 0. 
Singles: Donmoyer, L. V. C, defeated 
Hollinger, Juniata, 6-0, 6-0. 

Nye, L. V. C, defeated Batcheler, Ju- 
niata, 6-4, 6-8, 7-5. | 

Walborn, L. V. C, defeated Burkhold- 
er, Juniata, 7-5, 7-5. 

Ax, L. V. C, defeated Davis, Juniata, 
4-6, 6-1, 6-0. 

Doubles: Donmoyer and Nye defeated 
Davis and Todd, 6-2, 6-2. 

Walborn and Ax defeated Byer and 
Batcheler, 6-1, 6-2. 

Lebanon Valley 4; F. and M. 3. 

Singles: Donmoyer, L. V. C, defeated 
Myers, F. and M., 6-2, 6-1. 

Snyder, F. and M., defeated Nye, L. 
V. C, 6-1, 6-4. 

Hughes, F. and M., defeated Walborn, 
L. V. C, 6-0, 6-1. 

Ax, L. V. C, defeated Schleager, F. 
and M., 6-2, 6-3. 

Humphries, F. and M., defeated Shroy- 
er, L. V. C, 7-5, 6-0. 

Doubles: Donmoyer and Nye defeated 
Hughes and Snyder, 6-3, 8-6. 

Walborn and Ax defeated Schleager 
and Humphries, 8-6, 6-3. 



READERS' CLUB MEETS 

FOR FINAL SESSION 



[Continued from Page One) 



Dagh." The club followed him with in- 
terest through the entire story of the 
book. The book is based on an episode 
of the Armenian oppression by the Turks, 
an event which is actually supposed to 
have occurred. During this oppression, a 
remarkable Armenian leader led a group 
of his people to the mountain of Musa 
Dagh so that they might live there away 
from the Turks. Here they built fortifi- 
cations, set up a government, and began 
a world of their own. "Forty Days of 
Musa Dagh" relates all the experiences 
of this band of people, until after forty 
days they are rescued by a French steam- 
er. 

Present day thought in Germany on 
theology was the last topic considered 
at the meeting. Bruce Metzger led the 
discussion by an able review of the pub- 
lished sermons of the great German the- 
ologian, Karl Barth. Professor Barth 
speaks with an almost desperate earnest- 
ness of the religious hope which, as he 
says, can come in its fullness only when 
every earthly hope has been stripped 
away. Mr. Metzger stressed the fact that 
the book is intensely German and gives 
one a look into present day theological 
thought in Germany. 



A SIX-INCHrfRAN5IT THEODOLITE 
WILL BE QUITE HELPFUL IN OUR 
SURVEY, AND WE MU5T HAVE A 
TABLE 




i 



PAGE FOUR 



LA VIE COLLEGIENNE, THURSDAY, MAY 16, 1935 




M m m m m m ! 
BREAKFAST 
Toasted Raisin Bread 
and 
Coffee 



THE PENNWAY 



STUDENT THEME 

THE TRAGEUY OF SOCIAL 
AMBITION 

How vain we humans are! Who among 
us has not envied another's possessions: 
the man his employer's salary perhaps, 
the woman the social conquests of even 
her intimate friends? All our efforts to 
restrain these inward gnawings become 
impotent since their source is one of the 
scurviest inheritances of man. They are 
irresistible, irrestrainable. 

There is the family, unable any longer 
to compete with society's "Four Hun- 
dred" because of pecuniary reverses^a 
pitiful spectacle, indeed— which yet dis- 
plays a brave front while sinking deeper 
and deeper into a quagmire of unpaid 
debts and unrelenting creditors. It is not 
a bottomless pit, however, like Poe's 
Moskoestrom, into which the wreck 
sinks, but one with a finite end. It is an 
end of piteous humiliation with the stink 
of society's prodding mockery echoing 
and reechoing through the ears and the 
heart. In such a case there is no obstacle 
to thwart nature's cruelty. The name 
sinks from the community into oblivion 
to rise, if ever again, only in new sur- 
roundings and with no significance to the 
new acquaintances, with its reputation 
still to be developed. 

In contrast to the ancestral rich are 
the newly rich and the "social climbers." 
It is these latter classes who, the first by 
emulation of the actions of those weal- 
thier than they, and the second by false 
ambition, lower the social standard of a 
group. Their inevitable and well-merited 
end leads to the same deep dregs of des- 
pair as that of the family heretofore pic- 
tured. These parasites through their ob- 
sequiousness destroy any semblance of 
self-respect they hitherto may have had 
and often trample a formerly spotless 
name to the dust. While at their peak 
they lower the standard of existing so- 
ciety by obvious vulgarities. They in- 
variably decline to a lower position than 
their original one, further dropping the 
social standard of a group. It was thus 
that Rome fell. It is an impending threat 
to all nations. 

The evil results of social ambition are 
admirably portrayed in Oliver Gold- 
smith's "The Vicar of Wakefield." He 
advises one to "draw upon content for 
the deficiencies of fortune" since "there is 
no character so contemptible as a man 
that is a fortune-hunter." Let us all abide 
by this axiom. 



A MESSAGE FROM 

ALUMNI PRESIDENT 



(Continued from Page One) 



in another section of the La Vie. The 
time scheduled for the complete program 
will be Eastern Standard Time. 

The Alumni Association has about 
completed another year's work; a year 
that was prosperous in so far as it saw 
the establishment of an Alumni Giving 
Fund, and renewed and increased activity 
among the district organizations of the 
Alumni. We are not, however, satisfied 
and are not going to let down on our ef- 
forts until a much higher percentage of 
the 1500 or more graduates of Lebanon 
Valley are thinking and doing construc- 
tive thoughts and deeds for her welfare. 
The revised constitution of the associa- 
tion, which is ready to be presented for 
your approval at the regular business 
meeting, will provide new freedom for the 
association, and will enable us to develop 
new and fertile territory. We wish it 



BAILEY RECITAL 



Ruth Bailey, our accomplished and 
polished pianist, will play on Thurs- 
day evening, May 23, her last solo re- 
cital at Leabnon Valley and the last 
recital of the year. 

Miss Bailey will graduate with the 
class of 1935 and that means that this 
is the last opportunity of many L. V. 
music lovers to hear this talented fel- 
low student perform. 



were possible to have every member of 
the Alumni in attendance at our annual 
meeting to witness and aid in the consid- 
eration and adoption of a new constitu- 
tion, which we hope will be the means 
of endowing us with a new spirit and 
new life. 

Have you given any thought to the fu- 
ture of Lebanon Valley College as far as 
our athletic program is concerned? You 
probably have noticed and read of what 
the other colleges in our own class are 
doing. Do you realize that Lebanon Val- 
ley College is competing with these 
schools for students? If we wish to keep 
step we cannot fail to recognize the pro- 
gressive programs the other schools have 
adopted. We can sit back and await the 
time we will be forced to take action, 
or we can get on the job immediately and 
be among the leaders. "Which way will 
we take?" is a question that has to be an- 
swered by each one of us as individual 
members of the Alumni. Our Physical 
Education Department needs quarters to 
enable a well-rounded physical education 
program to be included in the curriculum. 
Our boys and girls, who are representing 
us in the competitive sports, are in des- 
perate need for a field house which will 
enable us to accommodate our own teams, 
as well as visiting teams. With present 
accommodations, we are not qualified to 
ask for admittance to many of the Inter- 
collegiate Leagues that all of the Alumni 
are vitally interested in. The Alumni 
Giving Fund helps to provide a certain 
amount of relief for some of the issues at 
hand, and we are hoping that the new 
Lebanon Valley Booster Club that was 
organized this winter with Prof. Ells- 
worth Nitrauer, of Mount Joy, Pennsyl- 
vania, as president, Ruel Swank, Pal- 
myra, Pa., secretary, and Prof. C. G. 
Dotter, of Annville, Pennsylvania, as 
treasurer will also help us to answer ad- 
ditional problems. We hope that you as 
a graduate of L. V. C. and a member of 
the Alumni Association will give earnest 
thought to this problem; thought that will 
be consummated by your attendance, sug- 
gestions, and support on June 8. 

In closing, may I thank all of the mem- 
bers of the association for their loyal sup- 
port of this administration, and trust that 
it will continue throughout the new ad- 
ministration. 

D. K. Shroyer, President. 



STUDENT RECITAL 



Tuesday evening, May 21, the follow- 
ing artists will appear in the second last 
student recital of the year: Helen Butter- 
wick, violinist; Kathleen Pool, organist; 
Ethel Keller, organist; Dale Roth, tenor; 
Henry Steiner and William Black, cor- 
netists. 

These musicians have prepared a pro- 
gram that is well worth hearing. 



Smitty— I like your haircut. 
Rusty— Yeah, it's almost as bad as 
yours. 



Green Blotter May 

Join National Club 



FOOTBALL WITH P. M. C. 
NEXT HOMECOMING DAY 



Application to National Guild 
Club Announced At Last 
Meeting 



If its application for membership in the 
National Quill Club, a national organiza- 
tion of college writers, is accepted, the 
Green Blotter Club will be the first so- 
ciety on the campus to affiliate itself with 
an intercollegiate fraternity. The an- 
nouncement of the application for mem- 
bership in this fraternity was made on 
Thursday night, May 9, at the final meet- 
ing of the year held at the home of Dr. 
and Mrs. Struble. 

In appreciation for the help and en- 
couragement of its advisers the club pre- 
sented Dr. and Mrs. Struble with a set 
of table linens. Dr. and Mrs. Lynch, 
guests of the evening, took an active part 
in discussing the papers which were read. 
Dr. and Mrs. Stevenson, who also had 
been invited to attend the meeting, were 
unable to be present. 

Because of the absence of tht retiring 
head scope, Adam Bigler, who was re- 
cuperating from the extraction of a wis- 
dom tooth, George Hiltner took charge 
of the business session. Louis Straub was 
elected head scope and Maxine Early was 
re-elected keeper of the Word Horde for 
the coming year. 

Helen Netherwood, Maxine Early, and 
Paul Schach then read short short-stories. 
Sylva Harclerode read a short poem and 
a dramatic dialogue, both melancholy in 
tone. George Hiltner's paper, "The Re- 
ligion of Samuel Johnson," presented 
Johnson from an unusual angle. In a 
long essay, "Keats the Philosopher," 
David Yake defended the poetry and 
philosophy of Keats. Louis Straub con- 
cluded this part of the meeting with sev- 
eral humorous poems. Marietta Ossi 
served as critic. After the reading, Mrs, 
Struble served tasty refreshments. 



Continued from Page One) 



The schedule in detail is as follows: 
Sept. 28— Kutztown State Teachers Col- 
lege at Kutztown. 
Oct. 5— Penn State at State College. 
Oct. 12— Muhlenberg College at Allen- 
town. 

Oct. 19— Drexel Institute at Annville 

(2:30 p. m.). 
Oct. 26— Fordham University at New 

York, N. Y. 
Nov. 2 — Pennsylvania Military College 

at Annville (Homecoming game) 

(2 p. m.). 

Nov. 9— St. Joseph's College at Philadel- 
phia, Pa. 

Nov. 16— Albright College at Annville, 

Pa. (2:00 p. m.). 
Nov. 23— University of Delaware at 

Newark, Del. 



LIST OF CONTRIBUTORS 
TO ALUMNI GIVING FUND 



(Centinued frem Page One) 



1913. Mrs. Edith Lehman Bartlett, Boaz 

G. Light, Dr. G. A. Richie. 

1915, Mrs. Ruth Engle Bender, Mrs. 
Mary Wyand Coblentz, Mrs. Ethel Hou- 
ser Harnish, Mrs. Belle Orris Richie, Rev. 
David E. Young; 1916, Rev. Ira S. Ernst, 
Rev. Albert H. Kleffman, Dr. V. Earl 
Light, Rev. C. Guy Stambach, Esta V. 
Wareheim; 1917, Mrs. Esther Bachman 
Booth, Mrs. Hilda Colt Jackowick, Rev. 
Abram M. Long, Dr. Paul S. Wagner, 
Ernest D. Williams, Edwin H. Zeigler; 
1918, Mrs. Dorothy Lorenz Long, Dr. 
Clyde A. Lynch, W. N. Martin, Ray- 
mond G. Nissley, Rev. Paul O. Shettel, 
Mrs. Louisa Williams Yardley; 1919, 
Mrs. Norman M. Bouder; 1920, Mrs. 
Helena Maulfair Bouder. 

1921, Gladys M. Fencil; 1922, J. Rus- 
sel Bowman, Mrs. Ethel Hartz Frock, 
Mr. Carl W. Hiser, Russel O. Shadel, 
Dr. E. G. Vanden Bosche; 1923, S. Lu- 
cille Shenk, Harold T. Lutz (Ex. '23); 

1924, Mrs. Elizabeth Hopple Wood; 

1925, Elsie M. Clark, Jerome W. Frock, 
Lula Bedsworth (Ex. '25); David K. 
Shroyer, Esther Shenk; 1927, Samuel K 
Clark, Hilda Heller, Emerson Metoxen, 
Mrs. Gertrude H. Nissley, Mrs. Myra 
Shaeffer White; 1928, H. Darkes Al- 
bright. 

1929, S. Jane Fearnaw, Mrs. Frances 
Hammond, Edna E. Long; 1930, Grace 
E. Keener; 1932, Mary M. Buffington, 
Hilda D. Buckley, Ann Augusta Esben- 
shade, Elizabeth Flook, Gertrude Hoff- 
man; 1933, L. P. Clements; 1934, Mary 

H. Lehman, John D. Zeck. 

Pledges have also been received from 
William Wallace McCorel, '17, and Dor- 
othy M. Jackson, '34. 



Prof. Stokes: A crate of apples was 
destroyed by fire, does this destruction 
terminate the contract? 

Hershey: No! They qan be used as 
baked apples. 



JUNIOR PROMENADE 

ENDS DANCE SEASON 



(Continued from Page One) 



uel Grimm, Professor and Mrs. Clark 
Carmean. 

To Richard Rader, chairman, and the 
other members of the Prom Committee, 
we say "Thank you for a lovely eve- 
ning." 



BOOMERANG 



The trouble . with most folks isn't so 
much their ignorance as knowing so many 
things that aren't so. 



Heroine (in Kalo play) — "Is there no 
succor?" 

Kanoff — "Sure, I paid two bucks to 
see this show." 



Ruth — "I dreamt of you last night." 
Paul— "Did yah?" 

Ruth— "Yes; then I woke up, shut the 
window and put an extra blanket on the 
bed." 



Louie— "I just can't adjust my curricu- 
lum!" 

Boyd— "Oh, that's all right, it doesn't 
show." 



"Always Reliable' 




Clothes 



The Logical Place for L. V. C. 
Students to Buy 

BOOKS & SUPPLIES 
ESBENSHADE'S 

38 N. 8th St., Lebanon, Pa. 



Van Heusen Shirts 

'Cut Right ... Fit Right' 
New Assortment of Spring 
NECKWEAR 
John Hirsh Dep't Store 



TOILET ARTICLES 

PATENT MEDICINES 
CIGARS - CIGARETTE 

ANDREW'S 
CUT RATE STOF^t 

OPPOSITE COURT HOUSS 

8th & cumberland 8t8 

Lebanon, Pa. 
VISIT OUR FOUNTAIN 



Goodman Brothers 



SODA FOUNTAIN 

CENTRAL^ 
Shoe Repair Shop 

A Trial Will Convince You' 
FRANK DI NUNZIO, Prop! 



For Recreation, Try 

ROEMIG'S 

BILLIARDS and BOWLING 



FOR QUALITY 

Baked Products 

PATRONIZE 

FINK'S BAKERY 

MAIN STREET 



D. L. Say lor & Soni 
CONTRACTORS 

LUMBER and COAL 
Annville, Pennsvlvania 



KREAMER BROS. 



Leonard Elec. Refrigerator! 
Hoover Electric Sweeper* 
Easy Electric Washers 
Gas and Coal Stoves 
Rugs and Linoleums 



Furniture - - Undertaking 



Phone 14 4 ANNVILLE. P^; 



THE BEST PLACE TO BU^ 
BOOKS, STATIONERY ana 
COLLEGE SUPPLIES 

BOLLMAN'S 

628 CUMBERLAND STREf* 



CLOTHING OF QUALITY 

J. S. BASHORE 



UBAN0N9/5 ^IN^/ fc^ w KAMG7355 

PRINTIN5f|felNDINC CO 

W£B£ATT/f£ WOJUD ONWS/fO#D£RS 
MAKE US PROVE /T 

LEBANON 740 WALTON 520 WASHINGTON READING 



Support 

The 
Festival 




Good Luck 
And 
Goodbye 



LEBANON VALLEY COLLEGE 



VOL. XII 



ANNVILLE, PENNSYLVANIA, THURSDAY, MAY 23, 1935 



No. 5 



L. V. News Hounds 
Meet 'Chez Struble' 

REGAL REPAST REPORTED 

Mrs. Struble's Dinner Equals 
Dr. Struble's "Children of 
the Moon" 



WAGS WAGE WIT WAR 



Schnozzle* Hampers Yake As 
Baus Wins Season's Pre- 
mier Meet 



The sedate journalists of La Vie Col' 
legienne cast on their go-to-meeting trap- 
pings Monday, May 20, for a get-togeth- 
er at the Dr. Struble homestead, said get- 
together sparkling with such witty sallies 
as were wont to flit about the salon of 
Madame de Sevigne. The big-wigs start- 
ed the evening by the ancient and time- 
honored ceremony of refueling to the tune 
of luscious meat-loaf, fresh, juicy string 
beans, browned potatoes, fruit-salad 
smothered in lemon jello with rich, 
creamy dressing, ice cream (walnut, choc- 
olate and fruit), and fragrant, steaming 
coffee. (Is that Lupton, I hear, licking 
his chops?) 

Thus amply and regally nourished, ye 
olde staffe gathered around the hearth 
wherefrom flickered a fiery, fluttering, 
friendly flame. (Get it, frosh? Allitera- 
tion.) Whereupon quoth King Cole 
("Doc" Struble), "My pipe, my bowl 
and my fiddlers three!" But, alack and 
alas, there arose but one piano player 
(Grace Naugle— blonde, North Hall, Tel. 
No. — Annville 9182). Miss Naugle 

(Continued on Page 2, Column 3) 



Student Government 
Boards Are Elected 



Louise Gillan to Head W.S.G.A.; 
Boyd Sponaugle Heads 
Senate 



Two big elections of the school year 
took place last Thursday when the W. S. 
G. A. and the Men's Senate members who 
are to serve for the coming term were 
duly selected by the respective student 
electorates at the polls. 

The results of the W. S. G. A. election 
ar e as follows: Louise Gillan, president; 
Irma Keiffer, vice-president; Charlotte 
Stabley, treasurer; Romaine Stiles, secre- 
tary; Helen Summy, Marian Leisey, Mar- 
tha Faust, and Ella Mason, board mem- 
bers. 

The Men's Senate elected the follow- 
1R g officers for next year: Boyd Spon- 
au Qle, president; William Kirkpatrick, 
v ice-president; Duey linger, secretary- 
treasurer; senior members, Anthony Jag- 
^sak, Lester Krone, Vernon Hemperly, 

avid Yake; junior members, Louis 
St raub, Paul Billett, Theodore Loose, Ed- 
ward Bachman; sophomore members, 
[°hn Tindall, Ralph Billett, John Mar- 
barger. 



Officers Installed 

For Wig and Buckle 

At the general meeting of the Wig and 
Buckle Club on Thursday, May 16, the 
election of officers for the year 1935-36 
was held. Harold Philips, who distin- 
guished himself as a critic and make-up 
director, was elected president, Louise 
Shearer, heroine in "The Devil's Disci- 
ple," will be the new recording secretary. 
The new corresponding secretary is Mary 
Jane Shellenberger. Miller Schmuck will 
be the treasurer. Harold Philips, Louise 
Shearer and Miller Schmuck are letter 
members. 

The following persons will fill the va- 
cancies in the executive committee: Lou- 
ise Gillan, Martha Faust and Maxine 
Earley. 

The retiring officers are: Charles 
Hauck, president; Rose Dieter, recording 
secretary; Maxine Earley, corresponding 
secretary; Allan Steffy, treasurer. 



Band and Soloists 
Give Final Concert 



BALTIMORE LAST JOURNEY 



Many Alumni Present As Big 
City Audience Hears Fine 
Concert 



The band made its final concert trip 
by traveling over a hundred miles to 
Baltimore on Monday. The last car-load 
left Annville early in the auernoon and 
arrived in Baltimore at the Fourth II. B. 
Church, joining the rest of the band there 
for a wholesome and deliciously prepared 
dinner. After this, some of the more 
curious members went sight-seeing. 

The concert, which was held in an 
I. O. O. F. hall, began on schedule time 
and in fine style and continued in the 
same manner to the final chord of the 
closing number. Judging from the num- 
ber of people who stood while the Alma 

(Continued on Page 3, Column 4) 



PRESIDENT'S CALENDAR 



May 21— Addressed the District 
District Christian Endeavor Rally 
at Dallastown, Pa. 

May 22— Portertownship High School 
Commencement address. 

May 23— Bird-in-Hand Commence- 
ment address. 

May 24— Wernersville High School 
Commencement address. 

May 26— Will preach at the Bethle- 
hem U. B. Church in the morning. 
Will preach at the Middletown U. 
B. Church in the evening. 

May 27— New Holland High School 
Commencement address. 

May 28— Womelsdorf High School 
Commencement address. 

June 3— Shenandoah College Com- 
mencement address. 

June 4— Tower City High School 
Commencement address. 



L. V. Downs Drexel; 
Drops to Crusaders 

BILLETT SCORES WIN 



Susquehanna Takes Valleyites 
4 - 3 In Non - League 
Tilt 



The Blue and White nine took a firm 
hold on first place in the Eastern Penn- 
sylvania Collegiate Baseball League last 
Wednesday when they swamped Drexel 
by a score of 18 to 6 on the Dragons' 
home field. 

It was the fourth straight league vic- 
tory for the Valleyites, and with the 
other teams in the league all having lost 
at least one encounter, the triumph over 
Drexel places the Blue and White in an 
extremely advantageous position. Two 
league games remain to be played, one 
with Bucknell and the other with Gettys- 
burg. Both teams were looked upon as 
strong contenders by pre-season dope- 
sters, but the Bisons have lost two of four 
games played and the Bullets have lost 
one of two games played. However, both 
nines are expected to give the Valleyites 
a struggle, and victory in this league, 
which is particularly well-balanced this 
year, would be quite an achievement for 
the L. V. C. diamond aggregation. 

Paul Billett led the nineteen-hit attack 
on three Drexel pitchers, the Valley 
twirler accounting for four blows, includ- 
ing a double and a long wallop over the 
left field stands that went for a home run. 
The Valleyites rang up five extra-base 

(Continued on Page 4, Column 2) 



Big Music Festival 
To Be Held Friday 

BAND, ORCHESTRA TO PLAY 



No Admission Charge To Last 
Big Music Events of 
Year 



On Friday the college orchestra and 
band will combine to present the final 
musical event of the year, the annual 
spring festival. At four o'clock in the af- 
ternoon the orchestra under the d'rection 
il Professor D. Clark Carmenn will ren- 
der a program in Eng e hall. At seven- 
thirty the band, directed by Prof.vs.sd - Ed- 
ward P. Rutledge, w tl give a -cquest 
program on the canicus. 1 i.ere will be 
no admission charge for ether conceit. 

The orchestra will play the following 
numbers: the "PplovetsiAn Dances" from 
Mi.- opera "Prince Igo; ' by Bor > lin; The 
Clock and the Dresden - ic,i.res" bv Ko- 
tclby, with Sara Light as piano soloist; 
Fred Fox's "Lo! Hear the Gentle Lark," 
featuring Anthony Jagnesak, flutist, and 
Homer Barthold, clarinetist Th • final 
number will be the famous Schumann 
"Concerto in A minor" played Lv Ethel 
Keller and accompanied by the orchestra. 

(Continued on Page 3, Column 1) 



Scholarship Award 
Winners Announced 

90 STUDENTS COMPETE 



Three Full Tuition Schloarships 
And Six Other Awards 
Given 



At a special meeting of the scholarship 
committee May 22, Lebanon Valley Col- 
lege announced the winners of the Stu- 
dent Competitive Scholarship Examina- 
tions held on the campus Saturday, May 
4. The recipients of the nine tuition 
awards will receive scholarships valued 
at $4,650.00. Approximately ninety high 
school seniors from Pennsylvania, New 
Jersey, and Maryland competed for the 
awards. 

Helen Bartlett, 503 East 41st street, 
Baltimore, Md., and Howard Baier, 244 
Wiconisco avenue, Tower City, Pa., will 
receive a full tuition scholarship valued 
at $225.00 per year or $900.00 for four 
years in the college department, and Rob- 
ert Clippinger, 124 West Third street, 
Waynesboro, Pa., will receive a scholar- 
ship of the same value in the conserva- 
tory of music. 

Carl Dempsey, 1131 Hepburn street, 
Williamsport, Pa., and Florence Mich- 
linski, 1901 Perkiomen avenue, Reading, 
Pa., will receive a half tuition scholar- 
ship of $112.50 a year or $450.00 for 
four years in the college department, and 
Dorothy Getty, 126 Erie street, Johns- 
town, Pa., will be the recipient of the 
same award in the conservatory of music. 

Day student awards of $50.00 per year 
or $200.00 for four years will go to Rob- 
ert Long, 23 South Walnut street, Hum- 
melstown, and Dorothy Wentling, 506 
South Lincoln avenue, Palmyra, in the 
college department, and Robert Smith, 
669 South 27th street, Harrisburg, Pa., 
in the conservatory of music. 

All contestants for scholarship awards 
were given an examination in English 
and American history. Those competing 
for college department awards were giv- 
en a third examination in their choice of 
an elective subject selected from the fol- 
lowing : Biology, chemistry, French, Ger- 
man, Latin, mathematics, and physics. 
Students competing for awards in the 
conservatory of music were given a third 
examination in voice or their choice of 
a musical instrument. 



Junior Class Elects 

Next Year's Officers 



Officers for the following year were 
elected at a junior class meeting on May 
17. Mr. Cassel's resignation as class 
treasurer, due to the pressing demands 
of other duties, precipitated a general 
election of all officers with the following 
results: President, Victor Fridinger; vice- 
president, Boyd Sponaugle; secretary, 
Calvin Reber; treasurer, Vernon Hemper- 
ly. The new officials take up their offi- 
cial capacities immediately. 



PAGE TWO 



LA VIE COLLEGIENNE, THURSDAY, MAY 23, 1935 



3U Collegienne 

ESTABLISHED 1925 



A weekly publication by the Under- 
graduate Students of Lebanon 
Valley College 



EDITORIAL STAFF 

David Yake. '36 Editor-in-Chief 

Lester Krone. '36 Associate Editor 

Richard Baus, '37 .Manauinn Editor 



REPORTORIAL STAFF 

Louise Glllan. '36 
Marian Leisey. '36 
Maxine Earley, '37 
Grace -Naugle, '37 
Martha Baney. '38 
Jean McKeag, '38 
Paul Schach, '38 
Emma Mary Smyser, '38 

Calvin Spltler. '38 

SyMa Evelev. '36 

Robert Spohn, '36 

Helen Summy. '36 ~- 

Willlam Earnest, '37 

Eleanor Lynch. '37-... -.Faculty and Alumni 

Duey Unger. '37 Kalozetean 

June Gingrich. '36 Delphian 

Louis Straub, '37 Philokosmian 

Jane Shellenberger. '36 Clionian 



General Reporters 

„ Features 

Conservatory 

Athletics 



BUSINESS STAFF 

Albert Anderson, '36 Business Manager 

Robert Kell, '37 Assistant Business Manager 

Elwood Needy. '37 Circulation Manager 

David Byerly, "38 Asst. Circulation Manager 



Single Copies-. 
Subscription — 



5 cents 

„$1.00 per year 



Entered at the Annville, Pa., post 
office as second class matter, under the 
Act of March 3, 1879. 

Weekly publication except during vacations 
and examination periods. 



THURSDAY, MAY] 23, 1935 



ADIEU, SENIORS! 



With graduation this June, one of the 
largest and best senior classes ever to 
enroll at Lebanon Valley will leave us. 
This loss will be keenly felt because the 
present graduating class is a class of lead- 
ers. In our little school world here on 
the campus they have taken the lead in 
dramatics, in journalism, in music, in 
scholarship, in religious activities, in ath- 
letics, in social activities— in fact, in any 
field of student endeavor that you might 
care to mention. 

Especially, the class of 1935 can be 
commended for the interest it has taken 
as a whole in class activities. Unlike 
many classes this one has managed its 
financial matters efficiently, it has selected 
good leaders to guide its policies, it has 
knit itself into a unit through a spirit of 
good fellowship and mutual interest in 
the welfare of the other fellow. 

For four years Lebanon Valley has 
watched you closely, class of '35, and 
you can be sure that we, the undergradu- 
ates, shall not soon forget the example 
of what a class should be that you have 
set for us. 

The La Vie Collegienne wishes to ex- 
tend our heartiest and most sincere con- 
gratulations to you "grand old Seniors" 
and to say once more that we hope you 
may enjoy the brilliant success in the 
dark, dark world that you are entering 
which you have enjoyed in your all-too- 
short college days at Lebanon Valley 
College. 



The La Vie Collegienne on behalf of 
the entire school wishes to extend its 
deepest sympathy to the family of George 
Holtzman and to offer our sincere hope 
for a complete and speedy recovery to 
our fellow school-mate. 



Senior Class, 1935 

Bachelor of Arts: Adams, Annie Re- 
becca, Gainesboro, Virginia, dorm.; 
Blouch. Herbert Roy. 585 Guilford St., 
Lebanon, Pa., day; Butterwick, Ann 
Elizabeth, 218 Maple St., Annville, Pa., 
day; Carl, Elizabeth Anna, 25 W. 32nd 
St., Bayonne, N. J., dorm.; Cline, Alma 
Marie, Mt. Sidney, Va., dorm.; Cock- 
shott, Alice Helena, R. D. 2, Jamestown. 
N. Y., dorm.; Dieter, Rose Katherine, 130 
Gray St., Bogota. N. J., dorm.; Earnest, 
Helen Frances, 16 S. 8th St., Lebanon, 
Pa., day; Fetter, Charles Willard, 132 N. 
Charlotte St., Manheim, Pa., dorm.; Ford, 
Elizabeth Amelia, 2916 S. Broad St., 
Trenton, N. J., dorm.; Gerber, William 
Edward, 643 Arlington St., Tamaqua, 
Pa., dorm.; Grimm, Henry Harold, 234 
E. Main St., Annvillt, Pa., day; Heilman, 
oaran Estella, 349 N. 10th St., Lebanon, 
Pa., day; Hiltner, George Joseph, 2517 
Francis St., Baltimore, Md., dorm.; Rei- 
ser, Frances Witwer, New Holland, Pa., 
torm.; March, Mary Magdalene, 3787 
Derry St., Harrisburg, Pa., dorm.; Mc- 
Adam, Sarah Katharine, 824 Chestnut 
St., Lebanon, Pa., day; Mentzer, Warren 
Franklin, Valley View, Pa., dorm.; Metz- 
ger, Bruce Manning, 37 N. Union St., 
Middletown, Pa., dorm.; Palatini, Henry 
Gaspar, 28 Lanza Ave., Garfield, N. J., 
dorm.; Reinbold, Emma Jane, Lickdale, 
Pa., day; Ross, Lester Fairfax, 417 S. 
High St., Mechanicsburg, Pa., day; Sher- 
riff, Stanley George, 804 E. Main St., 
Annville, Pa., day; Snavely, Pauline Lil- 
lie, Ono, Pa., day; Steffy, Allan Weid- 
ner, Berne Rd., Wyomissing Hills, Pa., 
dorm.; Wagner, Catherine Lillian, Wil- 
liamsport, Md., dorm.; Weaver, Marga- 
ret Isabel, 1831 State St., Harrisburg, 
Pa., dorm. 

Bachelor of Science: Arndt, Casper 
Edward, 440 Maple St., Annville, Pa., 
day; Bailey, Ruth Wells, 1448 N. 11th 
St., Reading, Pa., day; Barthold, Stewart 
James, 327 Philadelphia Ave., Shillington, 
Pa., dorm.; Baugher, Galen Benjamin, 
305 Chocolate Ave., Hershey, Pa., dorm.; 
Beaver, Guy Allen, Aristes, Pa., dorm.; 
Boran, Frank Patrick, 518 Sunbury St., 
Minersville, Pa., dorm.; Cullather, Frank 
Thomas, 314 N. 2nd St., Minersville, Pa- 
dorm.; Deaven, Myrle Evelyn, Jonestown, 
Pa., day; Denton, James Philip, 767 
Conklin St., Farmingdale, N. Y., dorm.; 
Ditzler, Marshall Earnest, Lickdale, Pa., 
day; Etter, Robert William, 279 W. Main 
St., Hummelstown, Pa., day; Evans, Da- 
vid James, 703 E. Main St., Annville, Pa., 
day; Furlong, Charles Robert, 527 S. 2nd 
St., Lykens, Pa., dorm.; Hall, Ida Katha- 
rine, 528 Pershing Ave., Lancaster, Pa., 
dorm.; Hartman, Elbridge Bradbury, 948 
S. 18th St., Harrisburg, Pa., day; Hauck, 
Charles Lawrence, Jr., 217-21 Lamartine 
Ave., Bayside, N. Y., dorm.; Holtzman, 
Frances Louise, 3104 Jonestown Rd., 
Harrisburg, Pa., dorm.; Kanoff, Michael, 
1131 N. Cameron St., Harrisburg, Pa., 
dorm.; Keller, Ethel Irene, 240 W. Main 
St., Hummelstown, Pa., day; Lingle, Les- 
ter John, 458 W. Main St., Palmyra, Pa., 
day; Lloyd, Howard Albright, 115 E. 
Caracas Ave., Hershey, Pa., d^\: Long, 
Theodore Kohr, 120 Mifflin St., Lebanon, 
Pa., day; Magee, Clyde Hugh, New 
Bloomfield, Pa., day; Moser, Lyle Alfred, 
Muir, Pa., dorm.; Ossi, Marietta Eugenia, 
468 Lanza Ave., Garfield, N. J., dorm.; 
Ricker, Jacob Henry, 620 N. Pitt St., 
Carlisle, Pa., dorm.; Roth, Dale Heniy, 
Biglerville, Pa., dorm.; Russell, Gerald 
Bernard, 125 Highland Ave., Youngs- 
ville, Pa., dorm.; Rust, Charles Francis, 
103 McKingley Ave., Lansdowne, Pa., 
dorm.; Saunders, Ross Leslie, Annville, 
Pa., day; Scheirer, Robert Luigard, 260 
S. Tulpehocken St., Pine Grove, Pa., 
dorm.; Sheaffer, Kenneth Charles, New 



Bloomfield, Pa., dorm.; Sincavage, Albert 
John, 404 New Castle St., Minersville, 
Pa., dorm.; Smith, William Hunt, 2233 
S. Broad St., Trenton, N. J., dorm.; 
Spickler, Arthur Good, 69 College Ave., 
Elizabethtown, Pa., day; Underwood, 
Philip, 1813 W. Market St., Pottsville, 
Pa., dorm.; Walborn, Richard Lehman, 
R. D. 1, Millersburg, Pa., dorm.; Walter, 
Donald Earl, 35 John St., Hummelstown, 
Pa., dorm.; Whisler, Kenneth Samuel, 
306 Third St., Hanover, Pa., dorm.; Wit- 
ter, John Edmund, Newmanstown, Pa., 
day. 

(Summer) —Fake, Elvin Belden, 1040 
Lehman St., Lebanon, Pa., day; Schwartz, 
Harry Joseph, 251 N. State St., Lancas- 
ter, Pa., dorm.; Thompson, David Law- 
son, 126 E. Market St., Pottsville, Pa., 
dorm. 

Extension Department: 

Bachelor of Arts— McCreary, Samuel 
W., 151 S. Baltimore St., Dillsburg, Pa., 
day; Salen, Anna M., Tremont, Pa., day; 
Smith, Evelyn Mildred, 31 Evergreen 
St., Harrisburg, Pa., day. 

Bachelor of Science— Bair, Naomi P., 
2003 Swatara St., Harrisburg, Pa., day; 
Lady, Carrie May, 229 Cocoa Ave., 
Hershey. Pa., day. 



L. V. NEWS HOUNDS 

MEET 'CHEZ STRUBLE' 



(Continued from Page One) 



played with a more unique understanding, 
a more marvelous interpretation of tone, 
and a finer dexterity of technique than 
has even before been heard on this camp- 
us, or, for that matter in all of greater 
Annville. (La Vie old style). Gracie 
was the "nuts." (La Vie— new policy). 

Miss Helen Summy (they named her 
Ruth but she grew a Helen), then ac- 
companied Gracie with her voice in 
"Roses of Picardy"— or was it "Moon- 
light and Roses"? — were the roses in Pi- 



cardy or in the moonshine— er-r-r, beg 
pardon, Dr. Lynch, I mean moonlight- 
now, where was I?— when in doubt, use 
a period—. Now after Helen and Gracie 
entertained us press potentates Grandpa, 
Tell-It-To-The-Marines Straub boomed 
in his big bass voise a horrid tale of a 
blustering behemoth who recked not at 
swallowing marble cake and rocA: candy 
with gusto. I forget the exact story but, 
anyway, ya gotta admit, "Louie," the 
guy wot wrote that tripe ain't no George 
Washington. 

At this point Grand Skeezicks Yake, 
who was esconced in tht center of a lux- 
urious divan and flanked by two of the 
ladies' auxiliary, felt the urge to impart a 
certain story which he had heard recently 
(one minute ago from the left flank) con- 
cerning a "habituee." (For further par- 
ticulars see Yake). The ball, now hav- 
ing started to roll, the remainder of the 
conclave (with respects to "Lew" Hoy, 
Lebanon sport and school board mogul) 
was devoted to general amiable raillery 
salted with wise cracks or "bon-mots" 
(take your pick) by Chief Pull-The- 
Wires Baus, and a short business discus- 
sion during which it behooved the afore- 
said Louie to hie him to ye grand old 
Senate meeting to discuss affairs of the 
gravest importance (baloney). The gang 
busted up and betook its sundry parts to 
the four corners of the earth — West hall, 
North hall, South hall, and East main. 

And now, Mrs. Struble, "Doc" and 
Tonky, all kiddin' aside, we had one 
swell time, thanks heaps, and cheerio! 



Professor— This examination will be 
conducted on the honor system. Please 
take seats three apart and in alternate 
rows. 



Movie Actress— "I'll endorse your 
cigarettes for no less than $50,000." 

Cigarette Magnate— "I'll see you inhale 
first." 



SAINT JOHNSBURY ACADEMY 

Saint Johnsbury, Vermont 

An Old New England Academy in an Old New England Town. Thorough 
preparation for college. Commercial courses. Dormitories for boys and girls. 
Tuition $550 covers all expenses. Scholarship aid for worthy boys and girls. 
WRITE PRINCIPAL STANLEY R. OLDHAM. L. V. C. 08 





at your service 



Hail and farewell, Class of 
'35! We welcome you to 
a wider telephone public. 

Depend on the telephone. 
The same speed and cour- 
tesy, the same honest 
service you found in your 
calls to family and friends 
while at college await you 
— as graduates — in the 
world of business and 
social contacts. 



The Bell Telephone Company of Pennsylvania 





No. It 



LA VIE COLLEGIENNE, THURSDAY, MAY 23, 1935 



PAGE THREE 



L # V. Co-ed Athletes 
Get Letter Awards 

BANQUET AT HARRISBURG 

jyjiss Kenyon Presides As Hock- 
ey and Basketball Teams 
Are Honored 



The girls' varsity hockey and basket- 
ball squads were entertained at a banquet 
on Wednesday evening, May 22, at the 
pine Street tea room in Harrisburg. Miss 
Ida K. Hall acted as toastmistress. The 
special guests were: Mrs. M. Green, Mrs. 
Lynch, Professor Butterwick, and Pro- 
fessor Stokes. 

After a period of socializing, Miss Mil- 
dred Kenyon, head of the department of 
physical education for women, presented 
athletics letter awards to the following 
girls: 

Hockey— Emma Reinbold, Ida K. Hall, 
Elizabeth Carl, Iva C. Weirick, Hazel 
March, Eleanor Lynch, Esther Koppen- 
haver, Anna Orth, Marjorie Smith, Er- 
nestine Jagnesak, Velma Gingrich, Lena 
Risser, Carolyn Kohler, Betty Kirkpat- 
rick. 

Basketball— Iva C. Weirick, Hazel 
March, Geraldine Harkins, Anna Orth, 
Marjorie Smith, Edna Binkley, Ernestine 
Jagnesak, Dorothy Kreamer. 



BIG MUSICAL FESTIVAL 

TO BE HELD FRIDAY 



(Continued from Page One) 



The band request program will include 
the modern "Headlines," "The Merry 
Widow," the marches "Grandioso" and 
"Desert Patrol," and the novelties. "Com- 
in' Round the Mountain" and "The Hoe 
Down." The students selected these num- 
bers during chapel last Friday. The solo- 
ists of the evening will be Emily Kindt, 
xylophonist, and Earl linger, cornetist. 
In case of rain, this concert will be given 
in Engle hall. 



L. V. C. TENNIS 



Lebanon Valley s racqueteers gave a 
good account of themselves during the 
last week of campaigning, splitting even 
in four matches on foreign courts and 
giving the strong Muhlenberg net team a 
good fight before going down in defeat 
by a 4-3 count in a match played on the 
home courts Monday. 

Homer Donmoyer, flashy No. 1 player, 
defeated his Muhlenberg opponent in 
three sets, 5-7, 9-7, and 6-2, but the other 
four Blue and White netmen lost in 
straight sets to put Valley out of the 
running before the doubles were played. 
The tandem combinations of Donmoyer- 
Nye and Walborn-Ax chalked up victor- 
ies for L. V. C. to bring the final count to 
4-3, favoring the Mules. 

The matches on foreign courts were 
played against Bucknell, Moravian, St. 
Joseph's, and Ursinus. Bucknell beat the 
Valleyites 5 to 2, with Ax in the singles 
and the team of Donmoyer and Shroyer 
in the doubles the only winners for Leb- 
anon Valley. 

Moravian went down before the Blue 
and White by the score of 8 to 1, the 
only Valley defeat being in a three-set 
struggle. St. Joseph's was overwhelmed 
7 to 0, but Ursinus triumphed over the 
Valleyites by the narrow 4-3 margin. At 
Collegeville the Blue and White regis- 
tered two wins in the five singles en- 
counters, and a double victory in the 
doubles would have meant defeat for Ur- 
sinus. However, Donmoyer and Shroyer, 
the singles winners, lost to the No. 1 Ur- 
sinus combination of Davidson and 
Heiges to give the Bears the match. 

To date the racqueteers sport a record 
of five wins in nine matches, with three 
left to play. Bonebrake Seminary, Al- 
bright, and the Alumni will offer the op- 
position in Lebanon Valley's final tennis 
Moravian, 6-2, 6-4; Ax, L. V. C, defeat- 
ed Helmich, Moravian, 6-1, 6-1; Shroyer, 
L. V. C, defeated Heske, Moravian, 6-4, 
6-4; Thompson, Moravian, defeated La- 
zin, L. V. C, 4-6, 6-3, 6-1; Donmoyer 
and Nye defeated Charles and Thomp- 
son, 6-3, 6-2; Ax and Walborn defeated 
Flaer and Schwarze, 6-4, 6-2; Shroyer 



and Lazin defeated Heske and Helmich, 
encounters. Summaries: 

Bucknell 5; Lebanon 2. 

Dunham, Bucknell, defeated Donmoyer, 
L. V. C, 6-3, 7-5; Nesbitt, Bucknell, de - 
feated Nye, L. V. C, 6-3, 6-3; Neese, 
Bucknell, defeated Walborn, L. V. C, 
6-2, 3-6, 6-2; Ax, L. V. C, defeated 
Green, Bucknell, 6-1, 6-3; Bowler, Buck- 
nell, defeated Shroyer, L. V. C, 4-6, 6-3, 
6-3; Donmoyer and Shroyer defeated 
Dunham and Nesbitt, 6-4, 3-6, 8-6; Neese 
and Green defeated Ax and Walborn, 

6- 2, 6-4. 

Lebanon Valley 8; Moravian 1. 

Donmoyer, L. V. C, defeated Flaer, 
Moravian, 6-2, 6-3; Nye, L. V. C, de- 
feated Schwarze, Moravian, 6-2, 6-3; 
Walborn, L. V. C, defeated Charles, 

7- 5, 6-4. 

Lebanon Valley 7; St. Joseph's 0. 

Donmoyer, L. V. C, defeated Young, 
St. Joe, 6-4, 6-3; Nye, L. V. C, defeated 
Mcllveheney, 10-8, 6-2; Walborn, L. V. 
G, defeated Foreman, St Joe, 6-3, 6-3; 
Ax, L. V. C, defeated Kalebach, St. Joe, 
6-3, 6-4; Shroyer, L. V. C, defeated 
Crowley, St. Joe, 6-2, 5-7, 6-3; Donmoy- 
er and Nye defeated Young and Mcllve- 
heney, 7-5, 3-6, 6-1; Ax and Walborn de- 
feated Foreman and Kalebach, 8-6, 7-5. 

Ursinus 4; Lebanon Valley 3. 

Donmoyer, L. V. C, defeated David- 
son, Ursinus, 6-2, 5-7, 6-2; Heiges, Ursi- 
nus, defeated Nye, L. V. C, 6-0, 6-1; 
Worcester, Ursinus, defeated Walborn, 
L. V. C, 6-4, 7-5; Fennimore, Ursinus, 
defeated Ax, L. V. C, 6-2, 6-2; Shroyer, 
L. V. G, defeated Gaumer, Ursinus, 2-6, 
6-3, 6-2; Davidson and Heiges defeated 
Donmoyer and Shroyer, 6-3, 6-1; Ax and 
Walborn defeated Worcester and Fenni- 
more, 6-2, 6-2. 

Muhlenberg 4; Lebanon Valley 3. 

Donmoyer, L. V. G, defeated Herzen- 
berg, Muhlenberg, 5-7, 9-7, 6-2; Fischer, 
Muhlenberg, defeated Nye, L. V. C, 8-6, 
6-4; Koch, Muhlenberg, defeated Wal- 
born, L. V. G, 6-2, 6-1; Young, Muhlen- 
berg, defeated Ax, L. V. C, 6-4, 10-8; 
Seegers, Muhlenberg, defeated Shroyer, 
L. V. G, 6-1, 6-4; Donmoyer and Nye 
defeated Herzenberg and Koch, 6-2, 6-4; 
Walborn and Ax defeated Fischer and 
Seegers, 7-5, 5-7, 6-4. 



Conserv Sponsors 

Dance At Lebanon 



The final dance of the season sponsored 
by the Conservatory will be held Friday, 
May 24, in the Colonial ballroom above 
the Colonial theatre in Lebanon. Exten- 
sive plans have been made for this affair 
which will last from 9:00 P. M. until 
12 o'clock midnight. 

Those present will be members of the 
L. V. C. band, Glee Club, symphony or- 
chestra, college orchestra, and the music 
education students, and their "dates." 
They will dance to the music of Earl 
Unger and his orchestra. 

The committee in charge of the dance 
consists of Robert Sausser, Katharine 
McAdam, Greta Heiland, and Dale 
Roth. 



BAND AND SOLOISTS 

GIVE FINAL CONCERT 



(Continued from Page One) 



Mater was being played, there were a 
good many alumni present to hear the 
concert. Among the more recently grad- 
uated were: "Mac" McFaul, "Ray" 
Johnson, "Herb" Hoover, and "Chief" 
Umberger, all of the class of '34. Robert 
Rawhouser was also present, representing 
the class of '32. 

The concert was well received by the 
audience, which was made up of about 
five hundred music-loving friends and 
alumni of Lebanon Valley. In every re- 
spect, with the possible exception of a few 
minor incidents (Homer Barthold and 
Earl Fauber can furnish information) the 
trip to Baltimore by the band was a suc- 
cess. The soloists were Emily Kindt and 
Stuart Goodman. They were accompa- 
nied by Ruth Bailey and Sara Light. 



John— "You look sweet enough to eat." 
Hazel— "Good, let's go to the Penn- 

way." 



Shed a tear for poor Oscar who still 
thinks the wheat belt is a hula- hula 
dancer's skirt. 



IF MONEY IS WORTH 5.29% - COULD YOU 
HOLD ON TO $10,000 FOR. 
FOUR YEARS AND WHAT 
L WOULD IT GET YO U? 




TOBACCOS 



PAGE FOUR 



LA VIE COLLEGIENNE, THURSDAY, MAY 23, 1935 




Campus Cuts 

By this time we have despaired of get- 
ting our "Quitties," although the editor 
assures us that this delay serves only to 
create more suspense and interest. That 
astute business man forgets, however, 
that there is an end to all human patience, 
and he is going past the limits. Let's re- 
volt! 



Better still, we might get those juniors 
who haven't paid their class dues. 



M m m m m m I 
BREAKFAST 
Toasted Raisin Bread 
and 
Coffee 



through it. A perfect finger nail brush, 
eh! 



Re-reading Campus Cuts, Carolyn 
Kohler cried, "That's one thing, no one 
knows anything about me." How about 
it, kids? Any suggestions? 

Anna Mary Herr must be the hench- 
man of Boyd Shaffer. Anyway, Louie 
has an enormous bump on her head and 
she says that Anna Mary hit her with a 
door. 



And so, adios 'till next year! 



initial sack and Barthold came through 
with a double to score Rust. Bartolet was 
the final out on strikes, leaving Boran and 
Barthold stranded. 

Witter opened the eighth with a single, 
taking third on Rust's fourth safe blow 
of the game, a single over second base. 
Both Valley runners were left on base 
when Patrizio was retired, Spitzner to 
Eisenhauer, to end the inning. 

Boran got a hit in the ninth after one 
was gone and advanced when Bartolet 
drew a base on balls following the sec- 
ond out, a strike-out by Barthold. Smith 
was sent in to bat for Witter, but fouled 
out to Eisenhauer to retire the side. 

Considering everything, Lebanon Val- 
ley had a decided edge on the Crusaders, 
but runs win ball games, and nothing 
else. At any rate, the Flying Dutchmen 
are still undefeated in league competition 
and sport a record of five victories in 
?ight starts for the season. 



' What's the matter with the cannibal 

chief?" 

"Well, he just finished eating the Y. 
M. C. A. president, and you know, you 
can't keep a good man down." 



"I just used your tooth powder. I hope 
you didn't mind." 

"But I haven't got any tooth powder." 

"Yes, you have. It was on the mantle." 

"Migawd! Those were my mother-in- 
law's ashes." 



Kirk — "You remind me of Nero." 
Bill-Why?" 

Kirk— "Here I am burning up and 
you're just fiddling around." 



THE BEST PLACE TO BUY 
BOOKS, STATIONERY and 
COLLEGE SUPPLIES 

BOLLMAN'S 

628 CUMBERLAND STREET 



KREAMER BROS. 



Leonard Elec. Refrigerators 
Hoover Electric Sweepers 
Easy Electric Washers 
Gas and Coal Stoves 
Rugs and Linoleums 



Furniture - - Undertaking 



Phone 144 ANNVIL.LE . PA. 

The Logical Place for L. V. C. 
Students to Buy 

BOOKS & SUPPLIES 
ESBENSHADE'S 

38 N. 8th St., Lebanon, Pa. 



TOILET ARTICLES 

PATENT MEDICINES 
CIGARS - CIGARETTES 

ANDREW'S 
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OPPOSITE COURT HOUSE 

8th & cumberland st8. 

Lebanon. Pa. 
VISIT OUR FOUNTAIN 



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Shoe Repair Shop 

A Trial Will Convince Y*m! 
FRANK DI NUNZIO, Prop, 




For Recreation, Try 



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Van Heusen Shirts 

"Cut Right . . . Fit Right" 

New Assortment of Spring 
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John Hirsh Dep't Store 



There is something else which continu- 
ally gets in our hair. A freshman couple 
is becoming more irritating every day, 
hanging around in the library, mooning 
at each other soulfully, writing ardent 
love notes to each other from the great 
distance of two inches. In spite of the 
saying "Everyone loves a lover," we 
would feel more like studying and less 
like committing a major crime if cultural 
education would be sought in the library 
henceforth. 



L. V. DOWNS DREXEL; 

DROPS TO CRUSADERS 



(Continued from Page One) 



Another gripe is the new style of hair- 
cuts now' sported by the male element. 
Our only description of them is a cross 
between a drowned rat and an escaped 
convict. We would advise you for ap- 
pearance's sake to wear a wig or a hat 
for the next few months. And they talk 
about women's fashions! 



We hear that the president of one of 
our clubs has been postponing calling a 
meeting for election of officers because 
he is afraid someone else will be elected. 
Such enthusiasm is commendable, Messer- 
smith! 



Things we have noticed lately— en- 
forced absences of juniors from class; 
signs of panic at the thought of next 
week; the sad demeanor of fond couples 
who are thinking about the long separa- 
tion in a few weeks; indications of glee 
on the part of professors and pupils be- 
cause of the long-awaited vacation; a 
rush to finish work that should have been 
finished months ago. 



blows among their 19 safe swats. Includ- 
ed in this guintet of clouts were doubles 
by Billett and Smith, triples by Barthold 
and Witter, and Billett's home run. 

The Drexelites threw in nine errors to 
help the Lebanon Valley cause, while the 
Blue and White committed only one de- 
fensive error behind Billett. The Leba- 
non Valley moundsman was not guite up 
to par as a hurler, but at that he permit- 
ted only nine hits and six runs. 

At the end of the first five innings the 
score was 3-all, with Raynes and Billett 
staging an evenly-matched mound battle. 
However, the Blue and White sluggers 
went to work in the sixth to score five 
runs, adding six more in the eighth, and 
registering a final guartet of tallies in the 
ninth. 



Did you know that Marietta is plan- 
ning to join a circus? She started her 
tight rope practice one Saturday after- 
noon—walked across a dam and back. 
Practice will make perfect— but wear a 
bathing suit next time, Marietta. 



Does anyone know if the Men's Senate 
meets at South hall? Louis Straub chased 
the La Vie staff from Strubles to school 
very early because he had to be at the 
Men's Senate. At 9:30 he was seen com- 
ing from South hall. 



Did Sylva Harclerode ever tell you of 
her tragic accident? While dressing for 
the Prom she received a very severe 
burn on "an extremity." She'll explain. 



Concerning tne advantage of the new 
male hair cut— Maxine suggested Ken 
soap his hair well. Then run his fingers 



Lebanon Valley's string of five con- 
secutive triumphs was broken by Susgue- 
hanna last Thursday on the college field 
when the Flying Dutchmen succumbed 
by a one-run margin, the final score be- 
ing 4 to 3. 

Witter hurled good ball for Lebanon 
Valley, permitting nine safe blows and 
walking one while fanning eight. Eight 
of the nine safeties were made in the first 
four innings, a four-hit attack netting 
three runs in the fourth session, the Cru- 
saders having previously counted one 
run in the opening frame. 

The Valleyites got twelve safeties off 
Yaros, three other Flying Dutchmen get- 
ting to first on bases on balls, but the 
winning punch was lacking when the de- 
ciding runs were on base. No less than 
eleven Valleyites were left stranded on 
the sacks in the last five innings. 

Hits by Arndt and Rust and a base on 
ball-, issued to Billett filled the bases in 
the fifth, but in the meantime Mentzer 
and Patrizio had been retired, and Bad- 
ger took Boran's fly to right field for the 
final out of the session. 

In the sixth, Barthold and Bartolet 
opened with a hit and a base on balls, 
but neither Witter, Mentzer. nor Arndt 
could produce the necessary safety. 

In the seventh Rust scored after his 
single, but two other runners were left 
stranded when Bartolet fanned. Patrizio 
followed Rust's single by hitting a high 
fly to Hanna in center field. Billett struck 
out, but Boran got a free ticket to the 



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